IT’S TOUGH BEING A KING AND WRITER – IGWE IWEKA

IT’S TOUGH BEING A KING AND WRITER – IGWE IWEKA

Igwe Iweka

For His Royal Highness, Igwe Chidubem Iweka III, writing novels and kingship are two different tasks that must be fulfilled, CHUX OHAI writes

Like Prof. Chukwuemeka Ike, who is the Eze of Ndikelionwu in Anambra State, Igwe Chidubem Iweka III of Obosi – in the same state – is fully involved in creative writing.

The monarch is not only enthusiastic about literary production, he has published some books and regularly attends the annual international convention of the Association of Nigerian Authors.

“I started writing when I was in Form Two in secondary school. This was in the early 1970s. I started by writing short stories,” he says, in an interview with our correspondent.

Encouraged by his teachers, he was able to sustain this passion for writing through the years. The encouragement gave him the necessary incentive to keep writing.

Apart from that, it seems that writing runs in Igwe Iweka’s family. The monarch’s grandfather was the first person to write the history of Obosi (his domain) and Igboland in 1923.

“My grandfather ordered a typewriter that printed the Igbo alphabet from England. He typed the manuscript of his book in both Igbo and English languages with this typewriter,” he adds.

The Igwe also recalls that his mother wrote poetry when he was still a youth, thus affirming that he inherited the gift of writing from both parents.

So far, he has published some novels, which some critics and reviewers have described as being generally suffused with magic and witchcraft – much like the earlier works of a writer like Dilibe Onyeama.

The author attributes this common thread that runs through most of his works, especially the two novels titled The Ancient Curse and So Bright a Darkness, to the influence of spiritual manifestations in the contemporary African society.

“Even those who profess to be Christians or Muslims are influenced by such spirituality. It is present among us and we live with it. Some of the phenomena that are deemed to be superstition may not be accepted as superstition by some of us because it is inborn. We were raised up with it and will be with us for a long time. That is why I find it fascinating.

“In the The Ancient Curse, which is my first published work, I discuss the proliferation of born-again Christian churches and the rampant spiritual fraud that it has bred in the country. Some of the people who profess to be Christians today are actually native doctors in disguise. They use this to bamboozle, defraud and confuse the masses. These are some of the things that bother me”, he says.

Unlike many writers who have had to draw inspiration from older and more established writers, Iweka says he never had any role models nor attempted to copy the style of any other writer.

To a large extent, he has managed to sustain a unique style and a narrative voice that is entirely distinct from the current stream of contemporary writing in the country out of pure concern for aesthetics rather than for commercial purposes.

“The reason is that when I set out to write I hardly think of the commercial aspect. I am usually driven by a need to deliver a message to my audience and I try to make it as interesting, suspenseful and colourful as possible,” he says.

Apart from magic, Igwe Iweka’s newest novel, So Bright a Darkness, is suffused with the themes of love, racism and culture, as well as others drawn from contemporary society. The narrative, which tells the story of a fictional Igbo community that is completely cut off from civilisation, also deals with the question of coming to terms with racism in the modern society.

Although he maintains that he has never been influenced by any foreign ideology as a writer, the Igwe is nonetheless concerned about the gradual loss of the basic components of the African culture and civilisation.

“In the process of embracing Western culture and giving up some undesirable African cultural practices, we threw away many of the good aspects of our culture. For example, in the olden days, there was not much crime because people were afraid of incurring the wrath of the deities. But, nowadays, people lie, cheat, steal and still they can get away with these because God is all-forgiving and merciful. It wasn’t like that in the olden days. This is something that I am very concerned about. It is also a major ideological influence in my writing,” he says.

Before he ascended the throne of Obosi Kingdom, the monarch was an active Nollywood practitioner. He acted in a few movies alongside some of the big names in the film industry. Aside acting, he wrote scripts for the screen and sometimes, directed and produced his own movies. But he had to give up acting because of his current status and the attendant responsibilities.

Unknown to many of his subjects, Igwe Iweka is also a musician who once worked with a major records company in the United States for a number of years.

“I am a singer, song writer and multi-instrumentalist. I play the keyboard, guitar, saxophone and percussions to boot,” he says.

He is what some people may call a bundle of talents, no doubt. But how does it feel to be a traditional ruler and writer?

“They are two different things that don’t mix. Being the king of a community that is quite populous and, to an extent, metropolitan gives me less time to write. I try to make out time to write,” Igwe Iweka says.

Copyright PUNCH.

NYSC MEMBER DONATES LIBRARY TO SCHOOL… SEE INSIDE HOW HE RAISED THE MONEY!

NYSC MEMBER DONATES LIBRARY TO SCHOOL... SEE INSIDE HOW HE RAISED THE MONEY!

…Library Books…an illustration

A member of the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC), Augustine Ereyimwen, has built and donated a well-equipped library to Government Secondary School, Kosubosu in Baruten Local Government Area of Kwara State.

The library, which, according to the corps member gulped N900,000, was inaugurated by the Head of Department of Education in the local government area, Mallam Idris Abdullahi.

Speaking at the event, Mallam Abdullahi applauded the gesture of the NYSC member and urged other corps members to emulate the initiator of the project.

“This, no doubt, is service to humanity. I’m very sure that the teachers and students of this school would benefit from the project.

“I hereby charge other NYSC members to emulate Ereyimwen in their Community Development Service (CDS). I believe he will reap the fruits of what he has done later in life”, he said.

The Head of Education Department, however, urged the school to make judicious use of the edifice.

In his address, the principal of the school, Abdulmumeen Musa, described the project as unique in the annals of the school, noting that the importance of the project to the school community could not be overemphasised.

“Apart from being a veritable source of learning for students, it also promotes reading culture in them.

“Library also inspires research work and other fact-finding endeavours,” he said.

Speaking on the sideline of the inauguration, Ereyimwen said that he was propelled by the need to improve the students’ performance and broaden their scope of research.

He said he found out that students of the school faced the challenge of lack of library, which, he noted, was responsible for their poor academic performance.

“I decided to create this avenue for the students to read and research because the library would offer them opportunity to borrow books”, the Edo-born NYSC member said.

On the challenges encountered in the course of executing the project, the 2014 Batch ‘A’ corps member asserted that sourcing for fund was not easy in the border community.

He contented that people derived pleasure donating money and materials to female corps members thatn their male counterparts.

He, however, commended the officers of the Nigeria Police, the Nigerian Immigration Service, the Nigeria Customs Service and members of the National Union of Road Transport Workers in the area, as well as the staff and students of the school for their generous donation to the success of the project.

Present at the inauguration were the chairman of the Parents/Teachers Association of the school, Principals of Calvary Grace Group of Schools, Amdanam Modern College, among other dignitaries.

MORE…

NYSC member equips, donates library to school

Kosubosu (Kwara), Feb 13, 2015 (NAN) An NYSC member serving in Kwara, Mr Augustine Ereyimwen, on Friday handed over a library to Government Secondary School, Kosubosu in Baruten Local Government Area of the state.

The library, which cost the corps member N900, 000, to equip, was inaugurated by the Head of Department of Education in the local government, Malam Idris Abdullahi.

At the inauguration ceremony, Abdullahi lauded the gesture of the youth and urged other corps members to emulate him.

“This, no doubt, is a service to humanity. I am very sure that both the teachers and students of this school would benefit from this project.

“I hereby charge other NYSC members to emulate Ereyimwen in their Community Development Service. I believe he would reap the reward of what he has done later in life,” Abdullahi said.

He urged the school to make judicious use of the project.

In his address, the Principal of the school, Mr Abdulmumeen Musa, described the project as unique, saying: “Apart from being a veritable source of learning among the students, it also promotes reading culture in them.’’

In an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN), Ereyimwen said that he was propelled by the need to improve the students’ performances and broaden their knowledge to embark on the venture.

He said he found out that the students of the school faced the challenge of the lack of a library, which accounted for their poor academic performances.

“I decided to create this avenue for the students to read and research because the library would offer them opportunity to borrow books,” the Edo-born NYSC member said.

On the challenges he encountered while executing the project, Ereyimwen said that he did not find it easy raising the money.

He, however, thanked personnel of Nigeria Police Force, Nigerian Immigration Service, and Nigeria Customs Service as well as members of the National Union of Road Transport Workers in the area for their assistance.

He also commended staff and students of the school for donating toward the successful execution of the project.

The ceremony was witnessed by friends of the school. (NAN)

“WHY I HATED MATHEMATICS AT SCHOOL” MORE EX-STUDENTS RECALL…ARE NIGERIAN TUTORS AWARE?

CONTINUATION FROM LAST POST

11.It is the Nigerian style of delivery that makes people fail math. You don’t force children to cram, when u do it leads to them despising the subject.I excelled in math by primary school, because we had practical applications.My mother allowed me to count money in the market, make sense of the change etc. By the time the further math teacher came around with cane in hand, half of us were just copying each other and making C grades in math.I got to university in America, and i ended up in remedial math the 2nd lowest level of math. To cut a long story short, i was taught by good people who demonstrated the applicability of math in our every day lives. I now have a BS in Applied math & stats, and i am doing a MS in applied math. If u ask me a basic theory,i probably cannot tell u verbatim, but i will express it how i understand.That’s as a result of a difference in teaching styles.

12.It’s all about laying the right foundation. When you understand the basics, the rest will just flow naturally.More effort must be put in at the early ages.

13.The teacher is entering through the front door i’m jumping out from the back window.But every time somehow i will pass exams without cheating at least a (D).This means if i had endured the cane and the magics i would have been a guru.Just realized it.

14.I won’t say my maths teachers were bad In fact they were pretty good. I kinda have a low attention span and just never got the hang of it, though i was in a science class. I also felt that most of what i was learning was irrelevant to life in general. After school, i was scared that I’ll never pass an aptitude test to get a job cos if ny hatred for maths!

15.Maths deals with deep thinking and reasoning if you cant do the two, maths is not for you. some maths teacher are also the cause of this hatred or failure in maths.Nature is also a factor to consider because if your daddy and mummy are dullard,grin the offspring are not expected to be genius.Look before you marry.dont marry a dully grin because of beauty and expect to bear a genius.

16.People hate it cause of:1.Bad teachers 2.Wrong notion that maths is hard 3.Laziness. My take on maths is that if can conquer it, you can do anything else in academics.

17.When they cannot understand/speak English well,How do they understand a more complex thing like mathematics?

18.Just need to add though, that the parents being dullards doesn’t automatically mean the kids will also be dullards.If the parents take steps to make sure the kid inculcates learning Maths at an early age, and stays hard at his books,his or her aptitude may improve.For example,Ben Carson’s mother didn’t know how to read but she still made sure her kids worked at their studies.

19.Math anxiety starts when teachers start to beat up students because they fail to solve a problem. Also, math is a form of building block, u miss a step, you aint gonna get the next. The earlier a student realizes this, the better it becomes for the student.

20.True talk, most maths teacher are always hot-tempered and wicked.

21.I think it has a lot to do with the teaching philosophy of mathematics in our educational systems. Being a Ghanaian, I believe the same problems are faced here in Ghana as in Nigeria. It is a very practical subject that must be made to bear a lot on everyday phenomena but the tuition doesn’t show that. Most maths instructors teach maths in a way that makes it look too abstract for students. No application is allowed to be made to scientific everyday phenomena but rather just numbers and symbols. Maths is about application. You make a child visualize maths by making it possible for her to associate it with what she already knows around her. The opposite is, making it too abstract and much of an academic exercise is the norm with instructors around here. Simply put, the style of teaching maths here doesn’t make it exciting. It is boring.

 

EXTRACTED FROM NAIRALAND

“WHY I HATED MATHEMATICS AT SCHOOL” EX-STUDENTS RECALL…ARE NIGERIAN TUTORS AWARE? (1)

1.I hated math because i used to be scared of my teachers and the methods they  used while growing up.

2.I think lots of students hate maths because most teachers don’t do a good job in relating the usefulness of maths to everyday life. Besides the basics of addition, subtraction,multiplication, and division many students don’t know why they are learning maths.

3.My life was a lot easier when maths was about numbers only.Later it started marrying alphabets E.G 2 + y x b. Very ridiculous to find y when x isn’t given.Where is y? I don’t know.All i know is y has a long tail and two branches!grin grin grin grin grin.

4.Because most Nigerian maths teachers try as much as possible to make it seem as intractable as possible.

5.I guess its kinda abstract for students.Few give up before they put in plenty effort. A-times some concepts are hard to grab until you get the right teacher.It only gets worse by the day.

6.I think the right foundation has to be laid early on from nursery and primary school for maths to be an enjoyable subject.I remember being lined up at the back of the classroom with other pupils in primary school,and made to recite the times table with our teacher (cane in hand) hovering around menacingly. I hated those sessions and my mind always seemed to go AWOL when it came to my turn to recite.Me always getting the hard ones like 7 or 9 times-table didn’t help matters either.Also, there needs to be more emphasis on smaller groups of pupils (like 5 per teacher) or study groups, for better interaction. Large classrooms help those finding maths difficult to easily ‘disappear’, and they may feel embarrassed to ask questions if they’re not moving at the same pace as most of their colleagues.

7.I liked geometry, some simple equations, and don’t recall what else aside from that. Maths need much practice.Quadratic equation in sec school was the subject feared by many,and which we all got goosebumps over. Even before the class people spoke of it in whispers as if na one dreaded masquerade.

8.Reasons are as follows

a) Good maths teachers are HARD TO find today! The teachers do understand what they’re doing, however, transferring the knowledge is more complicated than it looks?
b) Students are becoming lazier. Maths is not a lazy subject. A quitter is not a mathematician!
c) Maths itself is a frustrating subject–even for the experts.
d) There’s something very ANNOYINGLY peculiar about MATHS: When solving an equation (for example), you’ll know whether you’re doing the right thing or the wrong thing. Plus, one slight mistake and you’re done! grin
e) Mathematical concepts are very parallel. So therefore, when one does not grasp a concept, odds are it gonna mess most everything else up (Like a Domino effect).

9.People hate mathematics because:

a. Some teachers are not qualified to teach mathematics
b. It looks/ is abstract
c. The teaching aid/ method is poor
d. The fear of mathematics has been there from Nursery(Tender age)
e. Some students just don’t want to know it at all.

10.Maths used to make me sleep in my Junior and early Senior classes.And also used to pray that the teacher got out of the class fast.Wonder how they did not know…

EXTRACTED FROM NAIRALAND

TO BE CONTINUED NEXT POST

DEAR MATHEMATICS, I HATE YOU LIKE I LOVE YOU…

If there’s one thing that we all agree we have done in our school life, its this: Hating Mathematics.

And no, even the nerd of the class, the Albert Einstein who solved all problems within milliseconds cannot deny, that at one or the other point he/she too loathed maths.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that no matter how sharp your brain is, or how fast it works, you do get that moment when you go all blank, the identities just refuse to blink in the celluloid of your mind. And this moment comes only in the subject of mathematics. Astonishing as it may seem, we have despised different subjects over the years, history and physics being the top contenders for the second place, but Mathematics has been so consistent, just like its teachers who themselves forget all properties and identities and formulae, unless the question has landed from NCERT (WASCE) which they have been teaching from, since 20 years.

Then we have the embellishment of “Tuitions”. Look at a 5 year-old. Then look at a 17 year-old. Then look at them while they are solving maths problems. It just becomes next to impossible to find out who is in more tension! The Tuitions are a trend, a child might fail in all other subjects, but he will attend the tuitions for maths since class 1, come what may. And if a child scores less in Maths, despite scoring highest in all others, he will be stereotyped a “Rattu-tota” (cramming parrot).

We have harrowing encounters with the questions which ask us to prove the properties which some insane nerd with some overtly-energetic cells in his brain, centuries back scribbled somewhere somehow and forgot to erase it!

Now that we know,”Although the overall size and asymmetrical shape of Einstein’s brain were normal, the prefrontal, somatosensory, primary motor, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices were extraordinary.” We feel the pressure much less.

And guess what? People who included Maths in curriculum knew the pain that it will inflict on those trying to manouever their way through the labyrinth of the questions. How else can one explain The questions of maths being termed, “PROBLEMS” Even before you try them!

There are certain terms used in maths, which evoke confusion, vexation and frustration.

1)Real numbers- What do you mean? All other Numbers are “unreal”? Then why are we learning about them at all? Did I hear something about the practical usage deployment of Maths?

2) Differentiation: The worst part of trigonometry, lovingly called calculus! They ask you to differentiate without taking the pain to add the other part from which to differentiate. Enter Greek symbols. Alpha, gamma, beta. Sometimes I wish we would be learning about Greek gods as well!As if that were not enough, there’s double derivative to double up our workload. Are you still fretting over having to find the derivative again? I have a gift for you…. differentiate it again to find the third derivative, you moron.

3) Inverse trigonometry: Why the hell did you make us learn those abhorrent trigonometric identities in the first place, when all you needed was to force us to reverse our learning. And attempt the questions the other way round?

4) Complex Numbers: The numbers are complicated. Period.

Nonetheless, we have also experienced those moments when we used to sit down enthusiastically for practising maths, and with R.D Sharma in hand, (although I fail to figure out how a person can be held in hand, never mind , go with the flow), we felt ecstatic with every question that we solved. Those were the singular moments of pure pleasure in Maths.

But, alas! The agonising moments we faced when scratching our heads for finding the right property or identity, far outnumber the moments of delight we spent in the company of R.D Sharma.

So, as long as the invisible relevance of integrating and differentiating exponential and real numbers exists, so would our detestation for maths.

GOOD LUCK maths for you have to bear the brunt of being cursed by many generations to come.

(I know everyone has a lot more to fret about regarding maths….if you have suggestions for points I must add, then leave comments below….:-))

http://confessionsandreflectionsofastudent.blogspot.in/2013/07/dear-mathematics-i-hate-you-like-i-love.html

FORCADOS HIGH…JAMB REVISION NOTES (CHARACTERIZATION) …PART 2

FORCADOS HIGH…JAMB REVISION NOTES (CHARACTERIZATION) ...PART 2

…short play by Mason College Festac students…

2015 JAMB EXAMINATION REVISION NOTES AND QUESTIONS ON THE LAST DAYS AT FORCADOS HIGH SCHOOL

PLOT/SUMMARY,CHARACTERIZATION,SETTINGS,POINT OF VIEW,THEMES AND TRIVIA BY O.O.ODUMOSU EX-PROPRIETOR,MASON COLLEGE FESTAC TOWN (O8O33010872)

PART TWO…CHARACTERIZATION

EFUA

Efua, tall and slender with large eyes and long eyelashes. She was further described as a delicate and mysterious beauty. She was desired by the boys in her school. They wanted her as a girlfriend. When that looked impossible they wanted to dance with her but she eventually agreed to dance with Deji because he looked most harmless.

The implication of all these is that in most schools there are subterranean levels of relationships usually instigated, accepted or rejected by and amongst students which are mostly not known to school management.

Perhaps it was the intension of the author to portray this and at the same time show why many innocent and beautiful girls find it difficult to pay attention to their studies.

Efua having gone through a girls-only school up to SS3 class had imbibed some lady-like charms and could display good manners when she chose .During discussions with school management she turned part of it on like a tap when she thought necessary.

However, it is not clear whether she was being factual or ironic. One may also want to deduce that perhaps the author was implying that issues of etiquette, poise, and other public mannerisms are usually considered more seriously at schools that are girls-only.

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EFUA CONTD.

Nene saw her as an intelligent student because she belonged to the science class. But we later got to know Efua the poet , letter-writer and singer. In her former school she was the Editor of the school’s Magazine .She also showed signs of being an excellent public-debater and her school cert result confirmed that Nene’s initial disposition towards her was right.

Can we therefore deduce that the background of a student does not determine academic ability or performance in school? No, we may not. In fact it is doubtful if the author intended to say so. Generally speaking Efua’s case may be regarded as an exception to the rule in an opposite direction.The rule being that a student’s background or state of home affairs can affect performance in school negatively.

One also need distinguish between ability to sing, write poems and essays and academic ability in subjects like Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. The former may be a result of innate talent like the ability of Ansa to draw and paint while the latter determines a student’s overall results in WAEC exams. Fortunately Efua only happened by chance to have been a combo of both.

She was also bold and not prepared to suffer fools gladly. Whether student or staff they were all the same to her. She had the intellect and presence of mind to present her points clearly without holding much back. During the brouhaha about her so-called affairs with Miss Novi she held her ground without fearing suspension. Also when she felt Jimi needed to be defended she did so with all her might and was instrumental towards unraveling of the case and dropping of charges by the school and police. This might be a virtue the author wants students to uphold. It also seems like a recurring theme by the author that schools ought to listen to their students and not shut them down carelessly.

Efua had excellent personal hygiene standards. She was also well organized and methodical. Her looks and her bedroom showed these. But her state of mind still kept certain dark secrets we will remind ourselves of later.

The import of this is that we can’t really judge a book by its cover. Each student or individual we meet along the way may not be exactly what they look like and we need to be more circumspect especially in dealing with students and children.

In her former school she was active in a student’s club known as Angels of Mercy Club and when she eventually met Miss Novi at her new school she felt she was in heaven because of the latter’s love for social work relating to women issues and children’s rights. She joined Miss Novi in campaigns relating to motherless babies and Teens against HIV. Perhaps her personal experiences at home accounted for deep love for these issues but she took them to heart and Miss Novi told her she had the “face of an angel”. This was perhaps the ultimate in terms of any woman or man appreciating and complementing her without wanting to befriend her. This led her to infatuation for Miss Novi and her subsequent diary entries of “love”. Though her expressed feelings eventually led to her suspension her clearance later looks justified. The incident also shows how important it is to appreciate and complement students or children when they do well.

But unfortunately for Efua her upbringing and experiences also turned her cold and icy. Within her were what could be described as dark secrets mainly developed at home and perhaps from former school..In fact she too said “there is so much evil in this world” which seem to be a tell-all of what she had been through. By the time she got to Forcados High, her social skills were at the lowest ebb leading to her caricature as “snooty” or “the witch”.
TO BE CONTINUED NEXT POST
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FORCADOS HIGH…JAMB REVISION NOTES (CHARACTERIZATION)

FORCADOS HIGH...JAMB REVISION NOTES (CHARACTERIZATION)

…Book Cover…

2015 JAMB EXAMINATION REVISION NOTES AND QUESTIONS ON THE LAST DAYS AT FORCADOS HIGH SCHOOL
PLOT/SUMMARY,CHARACTERIZATION,SETTINGS,POINT OF VIEW,THEMES AND TRIVIA BY O.O.ODUMOSU EX-PROPRIETOR,MASON COLLEGE FESTAC TOWN (O8O33010872)

PART TWO…CHARACTERIZATION

INTRODUCTION
Characters in a novel are agents employed by the author to develop his story. This he does through their actions, comments, thoughts and feelings.

A short novel such as Forcados High may be used by the author to develop a theme (or themes), arouse emotions or appeal to humor. The author’s intention might be to teach, inform, warn, condemn, persuade, criticize, ridicule, inspire, convince or delight his readers.

Characters are usually built up around a subject matter or a group of themes and can be classified as MAJOR or MINOR depending on the roles or significance of the roles apportioned to them.

Sometimes two characters in a novel are in conflict with each other. In other cases the two characters may parallel each other in several ways. Whether they are in conflict or harmony the two characters may reveal each others nature simply by being put into the same novel.

The best way to learn about one character may be to compare and contrast that character with another character in the same novel. This we intend to do for Forcados High.

A character may be FLAT meaning he or she is dominated by a single trait. Another character may be ROUND displaying many different traits some of which may appear as contradictory as we find in Nene. A character may also be STATIC meaning he or she does not change from the beginning of the novel to the end. Another character may be DYNAMIC meaning that he or she changes in some way in the novel.

What is really important are the personality traits which the author uses directly or indirectly to portray his subject-matter or themes.

MAJOR/MINOR CHARACTERS

Major characters are Efua, Jimi , Nene and Wole

Minor characters include:

PARENTS/FAMILY…Mr and Mrs Solade,Femi, Risikat, Mrs Coker, Mrs Moni Alli, Pastor and Mrs Ekpo,

FELLOW STUDENTS…Ansa, Caro (gum-chewing), Jolly, Seyi, Ada, Okoro (gorilla-like), Rhymers, Eze, Bayo, Joke, Tchen Igbo, students of St Catherine’s School.

SCHOOL MANAGEMENT/STAFF/OTHERS…Mr Mallum/Principal, Mrs Obange,Miss Novi,Coachie, Teacher Salami,Teacher Bade (Cane), Mama Silifat etc.

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THEY ARE MEANT AS SUPPORT FOR JAMB, WAEC/NECO (MAY/JUNE OR GCE OCT/NOV) EXAMS (NO RUNZ OR EXPO INCLUDED). THESE INCLUDE:
SUBJECT NOTES & TECHNIQUES/STUDY TECHNIQUES/EXAMINATION TECHNIQUES/SCHOOL MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
WHAT ARE OUR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION IN TERMS OF SUBJECTS?
USE OF ENGLISH (JAMB)/ENGLISH LANGUAGE (WAEC/NECO)/ENGLISH LITERATURE (JAMB/WAEC/NECO)/MATHEMATICS (JAMB/WAEC/NECO)

……………………………………………………………………………………………

SHORT NOTES ON MAJOR CHARACTERS’ ROLES AND SIGNIFICANCE

THE COKER FAMILY & EFUA

The family was made up mainly of Mrs Coker,Efua’s mother and her Aunt Mrs Moni Alli. Efua’s father was referred to but not heard from in the novel.

The picture we had is that of a totally dysfunctional family especially after Efua’s father died and the mother re-married. This we got to know from the following reported incidents

-Mrs Coker was fixated on looking good and making profit from her business than giving any affection to her daughter.

-Efua’s step-brother was brutish to Efua until he travelled out of the country

-Efua’s step-father engaged Efua in sexual misdemeanors until she attacked him with a knife

-Efua reported the step-father to her mother but was given cold shoulders, and suggestion that may be she was the one tempting him! For this her mother kept calling her unprintable names.

-Following the knife attack Efua engineered her expulsion from her girls-only school St Catherine’s in Abuja by Mrs Obange.

-Thereafter she is moved to Lagos to stay with Mrs Alli. Her mother also got her admitted by Forcados High into SS3 which was unusual and not looked at kindly by staff members. Efua opined the monetary endowment by the mother was a bribe that got her in.

-But Efua found it difficult to have a normal relationship especially with the boys in her new school

-Unfortunately her loneliness and state of mind made her keep a diary which was discovered by Nene and mistakenly interpreted as evidence of a lesbian affair with Miss Novi

-After her suspension by the school her mother came with the offer of another indirect bribe. But her reaction to Efua was even worse. She showed no milk of human kindness to her daughter and started lambasting her with more unprintable names even while they were still in a taxi. Above all, when they got to Mrs Alli’s residence she showed no willingness to remonstrate with Efua. She disappeared as she arrived. All ‘touch and go’ as usual.

CONTINUED NEXT POST

REVISION QUESTIONS ARE FOR SALE AS ADVERTIZED NEXT POST

HAVE YOU READ OUR TECHNIQUES FOR PASSING JAMB WITH LESS WORK AND WITHOUT CHEATING?

HAVE YOU READ OUR TECHNIQUES OF PASSING JAMB WITH LESS WORK AND WITHOUT CHEATING?

CBT sample exam room

1.WHOM ARE THESE NOTES MEANT FOR?

They are for different categories of students including:

(a) those who are afraid.

(b) those who are confused.

(c) those who doubt their stages of preparation.

(d) those who have taken the examination once or many times.

(e)those who become sweaty as soon as the examination papers are distributed .

(f)those who feel they are short of time in the exam hall

(g)those lacking confidence in their teachers or in their preparatory schools.

(h)those terrorized year-in ,year-out by a particular subject or two.

(i) those taking JAMB exams for the first time.

(j)those who come across questions that they do not have the faintest idea about.

(k)those needing additional help from their friends or study groups.

(l)those determined to find a pathway or some light through jamb wilderness or darkness.

(m)those easily tempted to joined cheaters on the day of examination or those easily intimidated by what they see at examination centers.

(n) those usually tempted to follow cheating gangs before the date of exam.

(0)those who do not recognize that JAMB is a spiritual battle! Many of those whose results are not cancelled because of their centers need to know that it is the Lord’s battle.

READ MORE BELOW

1.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating1/

2.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating2/

3.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating3/

4.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/13/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating4/

5.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/13/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating5/

6.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/14/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating6/

7.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/10/14/passing-jamb-with-less-work-and-without-cheating7/

JUST FOR THE RECORDS…SOME SEE MY SON AS BLACK, EVEN THOUGH HE IS MIXED-RACE

 JUST FOR THE RECORDS...SOME SEE MY SON AS BLACK, EVEN THOUGH HE IS MIXED-RACEIt’s been over a week since Michael Brown was shot by the police. I haven’t been vocal on social media about the events, but my husband and I have talked about it everyday. In hushed tones and understood silences, we discussed it over our kids, hoping that they don’t understand all the nuances of our conversation. I’m not ready to explain the events to my eight and four year olds yet.
I pray I can shelter my children from racism a little bit longer, but I’m afraid that “little bit longer” is not very far away.

The families of Ferguson, Missouri are not so lucky. They cannot not shield their children because they are living the ugly truth about America: racism is alive and well in the United States. The parents of Ferguson cannot wait “a little bit longer” when an eight-year-old is hit by tear gas during a peaceful demonstration.

Shock.

Fear.

Helplessness.

Anger.

Hopelessness.

When I first learned about Michael Brown–the day after it occurred, those emotions ricocheted through my body like a pair of tennis shoes in a dryer, the thumps and thuds painful but necessary.

Shock because Ferguson, Missouri is the Midwest. Where my husband lived until he was 12 years old. Where he learned to speak “proper” English and not slang spoken by the black kids in his new home of Baton Rouge, LA. The South is where we’d experience the most racism. The South was the only home I knew until I graduated high school and moved to Syracuse, NY.

I’ve written before about how both of us chose not to live in the South, in Louisiana where we grew up and where our family still resides. While the natives of the DC metro area consider this area part of the South (Maryland and Virginia were slave states after all), it’s never felt like the South we grew up in. The international and transient nature of the DC metro area makes it feel more progressive than it really is.

During our quiet conversations about Ferguson, its people, President Obama, and race relations in the United States, we came to a realization that Ferguson could have easily been our small suburban town. We left Louisiana to seeming escape the conservative views and the open racism in the South, but we were only deluding ourselves.
We cannot run away from racism.

My family cannot run away from the blatant injustices that will occur because of their chocolate skin.

I confess to feeling safe because my kids’ biracial genes have given them lighter skin. I feel safer until Trayvon Martin was gunned down. Until Michael Brown is shot six times by a police officer even though he is unarmed. I feel safer until I remember how often my husband was pulled over during our three years in Syracuse. I feel safer until my husband reminded me of how a police officer followed his car for a mile before pulling him over for supposedly running a red light. In the very town we now live.

We’re not as safe from racism as I thought.

In some folks’ eyes, my son is black. He is African-American. He is a nigger. Even if he can check more than one box on the census.

It’s taken me longer than I’d like to write this post. I didn’t know what to say that has not already been said. Both on my blog I’m Not the Nanny and by others.

But I’m reminded by the biggest lesson I took from attending BlogHer ’14. I must tell my story and make my voice heard. Everyone has a voice. Together, I hope we are loud enough so that the people of Ferguson know that we are watching. We are here for them. We support them because they could easily be us. Ferguson could easily be My Hometown, USA.

This post originally appeared on I’m Not the Nanny. Photo by Light Brigading via Creative Commons.

-Thien-Kim

Thien-Kim wishes she got paid to nanny her own children. She blogs at I’m Not the Nanny and is the head book nerd at From Left to Write, a virtual book club community for bloggers.

http://www.blogher.com/ferguson-mo-could-easily-be-anytown-usa?from=pop

LITTLE WHITE LIE…HOW A BIRACIAL WOMAN GREW UP THINKING SHE WAS WHITE!

When Lacey Schwartz was accepted to Georgetown University, the school saw her photo and passed her name along to the black student association. The organization contacted her.

The only issue: Schwartz had grown up in a Jewish household in Woodstock New York, and had always — despite occasional questions about the source of her brown skin and curly hair — identified as white.=

She confronted her mother, who revealed that Schwartz’ biological father was actually a black man. The 18-year-old began a quest to reconcile her newly discovered identity with the way she was raised, all while navigating sensitivities around what had been a family secret.

Little White Lie, which was released in New York, LA, and San Francisco last year and is set to air on PBS in March is her documentary about that journey. Watch the trailer here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EqYtSqoigA&list=UUr9TEsXlmcmorp8XHCj7Wtg&index=4

In part, it highlights the subjective and malleable nature of racial identity. “If you looked too closely at it, it didn’t make any sense, so we found ways to see what we wanted to believe,” Schwartz says. “I wasn’t pretending I was something I wasn’t. I actually grew up believing I was white.” A childhood friend adds, ” I always looked at you like you looked black … but not that you were.”

Schwartz, who told Vox she now identifies as “black/biracial,” explaining, “I look at bi-racial as a category of being black,” said Little White Lie’s message is about more than just race. “I think the film’s broader lesson is about the power of telling the truth, having difficult conversations and then moving forward,” she said.

http://www.vox.com/xpress/2014/11/19/7242791/white-lie-film-black