“THE BLINKARDS” BY KOBINA SEKYI: THEMES AND CRITIQUES THROUGH BLOG COMMENTS FOR WAEC/NECO EXAMS (65)

 "THE BLINKARDS" BY KOBINA SEKYI: THEMES AND CRITIQUES THROUGH BLOG COMMENTS FOR WAEC/NECO EXAMS (65)

The Blinkards

THEMES OF THE BLINKARDS

The major themes are:

1.Denigration of African culture(whereas local values are as good, if not better, than any foreign set of values)

2.Culture conflict.

3.Dangers inherent in Europeanization

CRITIQUES OF THEMES THROUGH BLOG COMMENTS

BLOG COMMENTS ARE FROM….

These comments constitute a rich mine of thoughts students can extract for comment/discussion  WAEC/NECO questions.Each comment has name of commenter and comment date.Good luck.

    gamelmag28 October 2010 11:11

    The Blinkards and the Anglo-Fante is certainly an awesome book that throws more light on the attachment of the African to all things English. I think we have the same situation in our day, with the shift tilting toward all things American. By all means learn from others but the base must come from within. Everyone must read this book written long ago for enlightenment!
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman28 October 2010 11:23

    Yes… I agree with you. Now there is the Americanisation of the African. Everyone must read. An interesting comedy of the African hybrid
    Reply
    Geosi28 October 2010 13:14

    This is a well digested review.Thankfully… a friend lend me hers just yesterday. I’m hoping to read some time later but don’t know exactly when… Great review!
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman28 October 2010 14:06

    that’s great. If you could read Fanti (I read Akuapem but I tried) you would find it even more interesting. The translation isn’t the best.
    Reply
    Amy28 October 2010 19:33

    Sounds like a really great book. And especially pertinent now with the US trying to push their dominant culture all over the world. People say it is good to have books written about countries even by outsiders, but if those books are written by outsiders then it is no good thing at all. Culture needs to be maintained, and I’m glad to hear that people there are starting to more and more.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman29 October 2010 11:35

    @Amy I can’t agree with you more. A friend of mine (Henry Ajumeze – a Poet) – in a discussion about globalisation – said that globalisation is about what you take to the table and not what you only take from it. And I couldn’t say more. However, most African countries and other European countries are now seriously clamouring for American culture. First it was the Europeanisation and now it is Americanisation. The problem is whereas the problem in Europe may not be that pronounced, in Africa it is. For instance, in Ghana people prefer to learn English than their local language. Some individuals would happily tell you that I speak no local language and that to some represent intelligence. It is only through government intervention that the wearing of dresses made from cloth has become fashionable when the National Friday Wear was launched to promote the textile industries. And it is the Christianisation of the country that is to blame. People now regard anything about the culture as obsolete, archaic and reserved for the bushmen. Not for the intelligentsia. I cry when I see them.
    Reply
    Amy29 October 2010 11:38

    I would say that I can’t even imagine… but it is, one could argue, worse here. The Native Americans are on reserves, rarely seen, expected to act a certain way (we romanticize them in film), and many don’t learn their local languages or culture.

    In African countries the combination of Islam and Christianity have certainly done much to push traditional religions away and make them seem like less than they are. It’s sad to think that people wouldn’t want to learn their local languages. I don’t know how we can make globalization be more about respecting who we all are and diversity and be less about making everyone the same.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman29 October 2010 11:55

    Can you imagine a world where everybody is the same and no one differs? Where the book you read is only about yourself and no one else because like kittens we are all the same: colour, language, culture, religion, belief etc? It would be a boring world.

    In movies if you want to portray evil, portray it through the African way of life and religion. It seems that has become the mantra for these producers.

    I guess the problem is everywhere. People trying to be another and not respecting themselves. There is beauty in diversity. As for the Islamisation and Christianisation, the least said the better.
    Reply
    Marie29 October 2010 15:55

    Sounds like a fascinating take on a very culturally relevant subject. His personal story is quite something as well. Cultural imperialism is in many ways a more insidious thing than the economic kind.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman29 October 2010 16:02

    Yes! People always try to speak against economic imperialism but few talk about cultural imposition. Yet, what do we see… countries decide what other countries to do. Sometimes they are linked through aid.
    Reply
    Amy30 October 2010 12:55

    You are right – there is beauty in diversity and I hope that we all realize that before globalization has changed too much.
    Reply
    Anonymous9 November 2010 07:44

    The Blinkards is a good book. clearly satirizes fantis during the colonial era. i think the main theme of the play is learning to appreciate your culture and sticking to it no matter what.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman9 November 2010 07:58

    @Anonymous: I concur…
    Reply
    RAMZY10 December 2010 18:50

    i believe now it is clear that what the white brought to us time ago was barbarian now as we can understand the motive behind their doings.xzybit kings college kumasi
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman10 December 2010 20:53

    @Ramzy… sure. it is left for us to decide what we want.
    Reply
    jackie27 December 2010 23:03

    I think we ghanaians like the british fashion and that not good. We have to cheerish the afican value.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman4 January 2011 08:01

    @Jackie… is it only Ghanaians? I believe it is an African ‘thing’. We need to cherish what we have else we would be lost in all these globalisation thing.
    Reply
    Maxwell Odoi-Yeboah20 February 2011 14:15

    Great review you have here. Blinkards is certainly a classic, in my view. I think it should be taught in every educational instituition in Ghana and Africa because its has a lot to teach this generation.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman20 February 2011 22:15

    It is a Classic. If it isn’t then I do not know what a classic is. In fact the Anglo-Fante short story was published in the 1918. I agree it must be taught in all schools at all levels including non-formal education. If possible to all politicians too.
    Reply
    Maame Yaa12 March 2011 22:53

    ‘The Blinkards’ is a very good book and classic. i am really glad it’s now a book for the senior high school students.I believe that students and other people that read it would learn a lot from it,because we Ghanaians have got a beautiful and interesting tradition.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman14 March 2011 07:44

    @Maame Yaa thanks for this piece of news. I didn’t know it is now a reading text in our schools and that’s where it must begin. the change.
    Reply
    Anonymous29 July 2011 21:45

    Great review.As Ghanaians we look at ourselves in the mirror and we don’t like the fact that we were born Ghanaians. We then start copying the western way of life which is sad. Growing up, i must confess i nearly ended up westernized but i found my roots and i love it. It is good to be Ghanaian. We must go back to our roots before we end up like “Archibald”.
    Reply
    Nana Fredua-Agyeman6 August 2011 15:46

    thanks Archibald.
    Reply
    Anonymous30 November 2011 15:21

    i really like the book after reading all my literature drama books i saw that the blinkards was the best.the book brings out how best our culture is and how we should respect and love our culture.<>
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman24 January 2012 12:29

        totally agree with you.
        Reply
    wendolen203 February 2012 21:55

    for the sake of we students why wont you give us roles,characters and their personality as in a literary work. we students are finding these things very difficult.
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman3 February 2012 22:10

        Hi Wendolen20 I’m not a literature student. What I do here is for fun and to let others know these books exist, are interesting and worth investigating/reading. A detailed analyses of character roles and characters are the responsibilities of literature students like yourself.
        Reply
    Anonymous3 April 2012 15:02

    thanks for your work,but do you have the full video of the play?
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman4 April 2012 13:06

        I don’t have it. Sorry.
        Reply
    Donizzy-Jahzrael12 May 2012 14:16

    This book is realy the boom! It reveals all the “faketies ” of African die-hard persion for the English way of life. I do ask my self this question, WHY IS IT THAT, THE WHITES NEVER TRY TO COPY OUR OWN CULTURE ,BUT WE AFRICANS TENDS TO FALL IN LOVE WITH THIERS?
    Its soon melancholic!
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman17 May 2012 13:18

        This is a question difficult to answer. Perhaps there are those who on the low scale being learnt but largely, we are the borrowers.
        Reply
    nora nortey16 May 2012 21:11

    its really sad that our forefathers really copied blindly.the story is completely satirical
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman17 May 2012 13:19

        Are you sure we aren’t ourselves currently copying them left right and centre? Look at us.
        Reply
    gifty christian26 September 2012 06:55

    thanks for all ur ideas, bt for me, i think ghanaians ave abandon their culture, n they adopt other people culture. that is shameful to africans. why…
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman2 November 2012 12:53

        Blindly copying everything.
        Reply
    pretta27 October 2012 21:24

    i can read it over and over again.we are only blind imitators and not ready to use especially,made in ghana products. but i just like’u are unladylike’
    Reply
    pretta27 October 2012 21:31

    we are just blind imitators at least we can copy the good side.ican read it over and over again without getting tired.
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman2 November 2012 12:53

        I agree with you
        Reply
    Anonymous13 November 2012 11:39

    pls give me the vivid account on hw mr okadu woe miss tsiba
    Reply
    Replies
        Nana Fredua-Agyeman13 November 2012 12:00

        I’m not a literature tutor. I read for fun and I don’t think you expect me to have the story in my head in that detail.
        aisluv23 November 2012 18:07

        I think the Ghanaian has lost his sense of identity. though this book was written in the early 19th century, issues raised still prevail in the 21st century Ghana. My friends always seem surprise when i mention konkonte as my favorite food. they cant understand why a uni graduate will list konkonte as a favorite. Apparently what they expected is pizza or pasta or fried rice.. It’s a real pity.KUDOS I LOVE YOUR REVIEW. Maybe you should read BLACK SKIN, WHITE MASK by FRANTZ FANON and you will enjoy it
        Reply
    Anonymous23 January 2013 11:14

    Conflict of culture. The Africans has been tought to unlearn their own culture and embrace the western one. What we are made to belive is that, ours is babaric, savage, ancient and backward. The need a change of orientation, we need to put ourself on the right track because, in the next 20 years, our cuture will be only in the history texbooks.
    Reply
    Anonymous28 January 2013 14:12

    Tis a pity that when the West so much held us in captivity of the mind, our fathers were not at all rising to the challenges. It is now that we are waking up to see that we as Africans have culture, language, government that are unique to us as Africans and we do not want the West to take us for animals. The question is, in one way or the other, we are still enslaved by the West since our economy is determined and dictated by their wants and wishes. Let us stop consuming foreign things and learn to make and appreciate what is ours. The Blinkards is a PIECE!
    Reply
    Anonymous17 July 2013 21:04

    as Africans we should not copy Foreign mannerisms but rather stick and beleave
    in our culture
    Reply
    eric17 July 2013 21:14

    As Africans we do not have to copy foreign mannerisms but rather stick and beleave in our culture
    Reply

12 comments on ““THE BLINKARDS” BY KOBINA SEKYI: THEMES AND CRITIQUES THROUGH BLOG COMMENTS FOR WAEC/NECO EXAMS (65)

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  10. What great and inspiring replies.I now feel that the average African is realising who he is (an African)…I believe that it’s high we learnt to love and embrace our own culture and stop being copy-cats.

    Like

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