REST IN PEACE MAYA ANGELOU (4 APRIL 1928 – 28 MAY 2014)…A BIOGRAPHY

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Dr. Maya Angelou was a poet, writer, playwright, social activist, and teacher. She grew up in rural Arkansas in the heart of the Jim Crow South, and much of her writing reflects her experiences as an African American woman in the United States.

(Born Marguerite Ann Johnson on April 4, 1928) was an  author and poet who has been called “America’s most visible black female autobiographer” by scholar Joanne M. Braxton. She is best known for her series of six autobiographical volumes, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first and most highly acclaimed, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her first seventeen years. It brought her international recognition, and was nominated for a National Book Award. She has been awarded over 30 honorary degrees and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for her 1971 volume of poetry, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water ‘fore I Diiie.

Angelou was a member of the Harlem Writers Guild in the late 1950s, was active in the Civil Rights movement, and served as Northern Coordinator of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Since 1991, she has taught at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem,
North Carolina where she holds the first lifetime Reynolds Professorship of American Studies. Since the 1990s she has made around eighty appearances a year on the lecture circuit. In 1993, Angelou recited her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s inauguration, the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at John F. Kennedy’s inauguration in 1961. In 1995, she was recognized for having the longest-running record (two years) on The New York Times Paperback Nonfiction Bestseller List.

With the publication of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou was heralded as a new kind of memoirist, one of the first African American women who was able to publicly discuss her personal life. She is highly respected as a spokesperson for Black people and women. Angelou’s work is often characterized as autobiographical fiction. She has, however, made a deliberate attempt to challenge the common structure of the autobiography by critiquing, changing, and expanding the genre.

Her books, centered on themes such as identity, family, and racism, are often used as set texts in schools and universities internationally. Some of her more controversial work has been challenged or banned in US schools and libraries.

Wikipedia

Books/Works of Maya ANGELOU
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Maya Angelou

The Heart of a Woman
Maya Angelou

Letter to My Daughter
Maya Angelou

Amazing Peace: A Christmas Poem
Maya Angelou

Mother
Maya Angelou

Making Magic in the World
Maya Angelou

Quartet of Poems
Alice Walker, Grace Nichols, Lorna Goodison

Phenomenal woman
Maya Angelou

Wouldn’t Take Nothing For My Journey Now
Maya Angelou

Quartet of Stories
Alice Walker, Lorna Goodison, Olive Senior

Penguin Readers Level 6
Maya Angelou

Black Pearls
Maya Angelou

Just give me a cool drink of water ‘fore I diiie
Maya Angelou

Poems
Maya Angelou

Still I rise
Maya Angelou

Yo Se Por Que Canta el Pajaro Enjaulado
Maya Angelou

Conversations with Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou

Lessons in Living
Maya Angelou

Mary Ellen Mark
Maya Angelou

Mother
Amy Tan, Mary Higgins Clark, Maya Angelou

Oh Pray My Wings Are Gonna Fit Me Well
Maya Angelou

Ich weiß, warum der gefangene Vogel singt
Maya Angelou

Even the Stars Look Lonesome
Maya Angelou

Elder grace
Maya Angelou

Complete Collected Poems
Maya Angelou

On the pulse of morning
Maya Angelou

Hallelujah! The Welcome Table
Maya Angelou

Kofi and His Magic
Maya Angelou

Encontraos En Mi Nombre
Maya Angelou

A brave and startling truth
Maya Angelou

Renʹee Marie of France
Maya Angelou

Celebrations
Maya Angelou

Shaker, why don’t you sing?
Maya Angelou

My painted house, my friendly chicken, and me
Maya Angelou

Cedric Of Jamaica
Maya Angelou

Kofi & His Magic
Maya Angelou

Mikale of Hawaii
Maya Angelou

Angelina of Italy
Maya Angelou

Mrs. Flowers
Maya Angelou

I Shall Not Be Moved
Maya Angelou

Life doesn’t frighten me
Maya Angelou

Van Gogh’s Ear
Carolyn Cassady, Margaret Atwood, Leonard Cohen

And Still I Rise
Maya Angelou

Izak of Lapland
Maya Angelou

Now Sheba sings the song
Maya Angelou

Stranger Than Fiction
Dave Barry, Maya Angelou, Norman Mailer

All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes
Maya Angelou

A Song Flung Up To Heaven
Maya Angelou

Gather Together in My Name
Maya Angelou

Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas
Maya Angelou

The Collected Autobiographies of Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou

And Still I Rise
Maya Angelou

Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas
Maya Angelou

Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water ‘fore I Diiie
Maya Angelou

A Song Flung Up to Heaven
Maya Angelou

All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes
Maya Angelou

Poems of Maya Angelou

1. A Brave and Startling Truth 1/23/2012
2. A Conceit 1/3/2003
3. A Plagued Journey 1/23/2012
4. Alone 1/3/2003
5. Awaking in New York 1/23/2012
6. California Prodigal 1/23/2012
7. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings 1/3/2003
8. Insomniac 1/3/2003
9. Kin 1/23/2012
10. Men 1/3/2003
11. Million Man March Poem 1/3/2003
12. Momma Welfare Roll 1/3/2003
13. On the Pulse of Morning 1/23/2012
14. Passing Time 1/3/2003
15. Phenomenal Woman 1/3/2003
16. Refusal 1/3/2003
17. Remembrance 1/3/2003
18. Still I Rise 1/3/2003
19. The Detached 6/18/2005
20. The Lesson 1/3/2003
21. The Mothering Blackness 1/23/2012
22. The Rock Cries Out to Us Today 1/3/2003
23. They Went Home 6/18/2005
24. Touched by an Angel 1/3/2003
25. We Had Him 1/13/2014
26. Weekend Glory 1/3/2003
27. When You Come 1/3/2003
28. Woman Work 1/3/2003

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