MIDNIGHT MUSINGS ABOUT TWO NIGERIAN EDUCATIONAL MOCKINGBIRDS: EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES AND MASSIVE FAILURES (2)

CONTINUED FROM THE LAST POST

b)“HONEY WE SHRUNK THE KIDS” ANGLE

An adaptation from  a funny classic movie title may read “HONEY WE SHRUNK THE KIDS”  and is probably applicable to the state of our children today. The question to ask ourselves is whether we can expect good fruits from our present labors. Have we invested deeply and genuinely enough in our children generally to prevent or reduce EM? Should we expect a harvest as opposed to famine asymptotically displayed by the NECO result referred to? Yes our students are schooling but how much of education is really going on within the walls of our schools? Are we developing robotics or thinking human beings? Are we using schooling instead of education to demean the future of our own country? Is what is coming out of them not a result of what is going into them? Is our case not a situation of what you get is what you put in? Are the NECO results a reflection of the children’s true effort or a mirror of our materialistic society? Honey, have we really seen the worst yet?

c)REGULAR STUDENTS / STAFF / INVIGILATORS/PARENTS/TECHNOLOGY

Here we have to refer to Dr. Wilda again as we did under paragraph 6. She discovered that some of the causes of EM among regular students include the following (the list given is illustrative rather than exhaustive).

-some students in both public and private schools are not proud of the schools they attend and feel less confident about the way they are prepared for the examinations. Over the years they refuse to develop a bond of love for the schools and their methods.To them, cheating is impersonal and almost automatic. And the detachment from their schools seems to make EM less evil or painful.

-for others the pressure to do well is too intense. From the expectations of their families to difficulties arising from competition based on extremely high population of students involved and resultant high grades required to go ahead for higher studies.

-some students believe that some teachers are lazy and not fair to them. They therefore see cheating as fair play.

-some see it as traditional in their schools (even calling it “Agege Bread”). They join EM without bathing any eyelid!

-some have personal problems with certain subjects and get very desperate to pass them.

-in some cases cheating is a team effort and students have an operational understanding to cooperate among themselves. Above all they get less friendlier with those seen as “black sheep”

-for some students cheating start very early from primary school when parents did their home work for them. By the time they get to secondary school they have already acquired the mind-set for cheating.

-in some cases Parents and Teachers encourage them to cheat by offering and taking cash bribes.

-and for some students who have no love at home they come to the school not for learning but to feel loved. It is a chicken and egg riddle. Their schools emphasize family values including honesty during examinations. But where are the families?

-then of course modern technology has brought up things such as cell phones and the internet for cheating.

-we have also seen where staff members helped students to alter their reports cards before such got delivered to parents.

-for some regular students in both public and private schools EM makes them look like psychopaths during examinations. Some even look half-mad in the exam hall in desperation to cheat and hide the fact. We have heard of students who wrote ready answers to objective questions on EPL T-shirts worn under their regular shirts or on their naked thighs! Such students grow up believing that it’s hard to get ahead without cutting corners here and there.

TO BE CONTINUED NEXT POST

One comment on “MIDNIGHT MUSINGS ABOUT TWO NIGERIAN EDUCATIONAL MOCKINGBIRDS: EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES AND MASSIVE FAILURES (2)

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