WHY TEACHING IS STILL THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD

1. The potential to transform lives – ask any teacher who has helped a student in any number of ways, from academic to welfare and emotional learning, and they will tell you that life is not only good, but amazing.

2. It gives you the chance to be continuously creative – of course there are increasing levels of accountability in teaching, but teachers are allowed to be creative in every lesson. Even in observations, in fact most of all in observations, lessons are encouraged to be creative and interesting to engage the students. Teachers have so many opportunities to try new ideas, and indulge in iterative process to ensure the optimum learning environment is created.

3. It offers you a chance to continuously get better – teachers are not only encouraged to seek continuous professional development, but can ask for observation on a regular basis, to provide opportunities to grow and learn from masters or more experienced practitioners. In so few professions is there such support, and considering that as a minimum, contracts are for a year, teachers have so much time to demonstrate improvement. A growth mindset is part of the foundation of teaching.

4. It is a grounding, humbling profession – the amount of work teachers do compared to remuneration is shockingly disproportionate, in 2 senses: firstly, in terms of how many paid vs non paid hours of work they receive, and secondly, in relation to other similarly creative and important (and not so important) vocations in our society. But that is not why teachers teach. So few teachers go into the vocation for the salary – it’s a calling before anything else.

5. There is always satisfaction somewhere – teaching is a calling, and no one enters it without his or her inner voice telling him or her that. Of course there are always some imposters, but the massive majority have their hearts in the right place. How cool is that for the students?

Having said that, teaching can be and is incredibly demanding, and often we can lose sight of that calling, bogged down in aspects of the profession that don’t seem to be connected to it. But on closer inspection, most of the extra demands are actually central to the job itself: explaining to parents where you are coming from; being observed; collaborating with others; marking.

Take this last aspect, crucial to understanding whether students are learning what you believe you are teaching. Yes, it is very time consuming, but perhaps one of the most important and fundamental weapons in a teacher’s arsenal; any good school will understand this and the other cited demands, and create an environment where they become part of directed time.

It is when these aspects are not acknowledged in directed time that the conditions for burnout are rife.

6. It’s a chance to truly to lead the world in the 21st century – introducing students to new technologies and ways of presenting, curating, and collaborating with others with what they know is truly exciting and truly invigorating. Modern teachers are actually pioneering pedagogy, and can and will be able to hold their heads up high in the future when we look back and see how learning in this day and age took a radical but enormously beneficial turn for the better.

Engaging students in greater collaboration, and instilling initiative in curation and the promotion of information leads to truly independent learning, and setting up such learning environments is an opportunity that all teachers now have before them. There are few more gratifying feelings that being needed.

7. The children.

By Paul Moss

Source: Why Teaching Is The Best Job In The World

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STUDENT POPULATION IN NIGERIAN OPEN UNIVERSITY HITS 254,000!

The registered active student population of the National Open University of Nigeria, NOUN, has hit 254,000, its vice- chancellor, Abdalla Adamu, disclosed.

Mr. Adamu told the Economic Confidential magazine in Abuja that the number is distributed across the 77 study centres scattered all over the country touching all the states, local government areas and the six geopolitical zones.

“I can confidently confirm to you that the total registered active student population is now 254,000 scattered across the 77 study centres in the country”, Mr. Adamu said.

The NOUN boss also said that having the 77 study centres means that some states have more than one or two study centres depending on demand, adding that Abuja has about 8 centres.

He further stated that “some organisations come to us and ask for study centres and we call them specialised centres, notably Police, Immigration and the Nigerian Prison Service, while some states have community study centres.

He, however, noted that at the inception of the Open University, there were misgivings and mistrust about the institution, as many people did not look at it as credible and worthy. He said the pressure of students getting admission to conventional universities was increasing by the day as almost one million students want to gain admission into universities yearly through Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board, JAMB.

He emphasised that the influx has become so enormous that the state study centres can no more cope with the population, which gave rise to requests for community study centres by some states and these requests were mostly from the southern parts of the country.

Meanwhile, the university authority has sacked the two companies manning the Information Technology (IT) infrastructure and replaced them with an in-house team of IT experts, thereby saving the institution about 80 per cent revenue that had earlier been lost to NOUN.

“Well as for how much I have saved for doing away with consultants, I would not tell you that because that is our secret. When I took over, I saw that the entire Information Technology infrastructure were outsourced to two companies. One was called Cyberspace and the other called Emerging Platforms.”

“They were the ones running the entire system. As an ICT person myself because I spent about 15 years teaching System Analysis at Masters Degree level in Bayero University, Kano. Now how can I have a department of Computer Science, and the Dean of that department was the immediate Vice-President of Nigerian Computer Society, a professor of Robotics and other talents in ICT in these university, and yet still outsource all these to another agency, I said no it cannot happen!

“So the first thing I did was to look at the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between us and the two organisations. Of course they paid us the usual courtesy call so that they can remain relevant. We sat down and looked at the MOU and found out that in one of them the MOU stipulates 70 per cent profit and the other 85 percent of the revenue as profit because they provide all the skills, technology including examinations portal. I said this is not acceptable”.

“So we assembled a team and asked ourselves whether we can do this. So they said they can. Then I said go and design it and we decided to shut out the two companies and all kinds of legal battles started, stating that they have signed the contract for five years and cannot be terminated”.

“I told them that within the MOU we can give each other one month notice to terminate such contracts and so I have the powers to do so. You can imagine when the students pay this money, one company gets 70 percent of such payments and the other gets 85 percent! I said that has stopped, and any money coming to us would now be ours henceforth”.

He stressed that the revenue flow was able to provide needs of the study centres and train them at conferences to increase their efficiency, adding that the money is also used in paying for those writing course materials for the university.

We are contented because we do not request government to provide such monies, the professor said.

He said because of funds “being generated through the payment of tuition by students, the institution is now able to push out quality materials for students and also planning to shoot this into tablets, so that we have what we call “I-NOUN”.

“So this I-NOUN will be a complete package of courses. So we cut out these outsources and created our own services and it is working. The key to sustainability in any Open Distance Learning (ODL) is independence.

Source: Student population in Nigerian Open University hits 254,000 – Premium Times Nigeria

NACA DISMISSES HIV CURE CLAIM BY MICHAEL OKPARA UNIVERSITY PROF

The National Agency for the Control of AIDS, NACA, has dismissed an HIV cure claim by Professor Maduike Ezeibe, a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State.

In a statement entitled “Re: Nigerian scientist conquers HIV/AIDS”, Director General of the Agency, Dr. Sani Aliyu, said there was no basis for a claim to the cure of AIDS as described in the study presented by Ezeibe.

Media reports had quoted Ezeibe as saying that the drug, produced with “Aluminium Magnesium Silicate” was tested on 10 persons living with HIV. It was also reported that a clinical outcome of an ability to “reach all cells” and making HIV “a conquered organism”.

Aliyu said: “The claim for a HIV/AIDS cure is not new. It is also not new to find a scientist using ambiguous scientific methods and practices to buttress this claim, and to find obscure journals increasingly prepared to publish these claims.”

Examining the facts, The NACA DG who said the study quoted by Ezeibe did not follow standard ethical protocols for clinical trials, also noted that there was no evidence from the publication that the authors obtained ethical clearance from an appropriate body in Nigeria to conduct this study, and only ambiguous evidence that informed consent was sought from the evidently vulnerable patients.

“We are concerned that the publicity given to these claims will stop patients with HIV from taking life-saving antiretrovirals and give them false hope of a cure. It will be a great disservice to this vulnerable group of patients for the media to disseminate these claims in the absence of sound scientific evidence. “There are long established, tried and tested routes for the discovery, development and validation of modern medicines before they can be registered and used for treatment in humans and animals.

He urged all academics to follow legal and scientifically acceptable methods in conducting their research and to avoid making premature claims that are capable of derailing the huge progress made in the last two decades on the war against HIV/AIDS.

Aliyu also urged media houses in Nigeria to seek comments from the leadership of the relevant government parastatals and professional bodies when it receives new research findings related to our areas of responsibility.

“We call on all patients living with HIV that are currently taking their medications to continue to do so and to see their doctors if they have any concern. The NACA helpline (6222) is available on working days from 8am-8pm for members of the public seeking more information on HIV disease,” he affirmed.

Source: NACA dismisses HIV cure claim by Michael Okpara University Prof. – Vanguard News

THINGS STUDENTS LOVE TO HEAR TEACHERS SAY

THINGS STUDENTS LOVE TO HEAR TEACHERS SAY

5 Things Students Love to Hear Teachers Say

1. “You’ve shown great improvement”
2. “I’m proud of you”
3. “You were one of my best students”-
4. “You have the ability and the potential”
5. “You can do it!”

Nancy Barile

3 Things Students Desire to Hear From Teachers

“Every child needs at least one adult who is irrationally crazy about him or her.” – Urie Bronfenbrenner

1.”I believe in you.You are going to be successful someday”
2.“You have a purpose.I see it and feel it!”
3.”Question Me.Ask me how I am. Ask me what I need. Ask me my thoughts and feelings.”

Dr. Lori Desautels
Assistant Professor in the School of Education Marian University

ARITHMETIC-BASED GENERAL PAPER QUESTIONS FOR STUDENTS,TEACHERS AND SCHOOLS

CONVERSION DATA NOT AVAILABLE AT BACK OF ANY EXERCISE BOOK!

Length

Standard measure

1 mile = 1760 yards = 5280 feet
1 yard = 3 feet = 36 inches
1 rod = 5.5 yards = 16.5 feet
1 hand = 4 inches
1 span = 9 inches
1 light year = 5 878 500 000 000 miles

1 kilometres = 1000 metres
1 metre = 1000 millimetres
1 metre = 10 decimetres
1 decimetre = 10 centimetres
1 centimetre = 10 millimetres
1 light year = 9 465 000 000 000 000 metres

Surveyor’s measure

1 mile = 8 furlongs = 80 chains
1 furlong = 10 chains = 220 yards
1 chain = 4 rods = 22 yards = 100 links
1 link = 7.92 inches

Nautical measure

1 league = 3 nautical miles
1 nautical mile = 1.1508 statute miles
1 degree (@ equator) = 60 nautical miles
120 fathoms = 1 cable
1 fathom = 2 yards = 6 feet

Conversion factors

1 mile = 1.6093 kilometres : 1 kilometre = 0.62139 miles
1 yard = 0.9144 metres : 1 metre = 1.0936 yards
1 foot = 0.3048 metres : 1 metre = 3.2808 feet
1 inch = 25.4 millimetres : 1 millimetre = 0.03937 inches

Area

1 square mile = 640 acres
1 acre = 10 square chains
1 square chain = 16 square rods
1 square rod = 30.25 square yards
1 square yard = 9 square feet
1 square foot = 144 square inches
1 circular inch = 0.7854 square inches

1 square kilometre=100 hectares
1 hectare = 100 ares
1 are = 100 square metres
1 square metre = 100 square decimetres
1 square decimetre = 100 square centimetres
1 square centimetre = 100 square millimetres

Conversion factors

1 square mile = 2.5899 square kilometres : 1 square kilometre = 0.3861 square miles
1 acre = 0.4047 hectares : 1 hectare = 2.471 acres
1 square yard = 0.836 square metres : 1 square metre = 1.196 square yards
1 square foot = 0.0929 square metres : 1 square metre = 10.764 square feet
1 square inch = 645.2 square millimetres : 1 square millimetre = 0.00155 square inches

Volume

Standard measure

1 cubic yard = 27 cubic feet
1 cubic foot = 1728 cubic inches
1 cord (wood) = 4 x 4 x 8 foot
1 perch (masonry) = 16.5 x 1.5 x 1 foot

Shipping measure

1 register ton = 100 cubic feet
40 cubic feet = 32.143 US bushels
40 cubic feet = 31.16 imperial bushels

Dry measure

1 US bushel = 1 winchester struck bushel
1 US bushel = 1.2445 cubic feet
1 US bushel = 4 pecks = 32 quarts
1 peck = 8 quarts = 16 pints
1 heaped bushel = 1.25 struck bushels
1 UK bushel = 8 imperial gallons

Liquid measure

1 US gallon = 4 quarts = 8 pints
1 quart = 2 pints = 8 gills
1 UK gallon = 1.2009 US gallons

Old liquid measure

1 tun = 2 pipes = 3 puncheons
1 pipe = 1 butt = 2 hogsheads = 4 barrels
1 puncheon = 2 tierces = 84 gallons
1 tierce = 42 gallons
1 barrel = 31.5 gallons

Apothecaries fluid measure

1 US fluid ounce = 8 drachms
1 fluid drachm = 60 mimims
1 US fluid ounce = 1.805 cubic inches
1 UK fluid ounce = 1.732 cubic inches

Cubic measure
1 cubic metre = 1000 cubic decimetres
1 cubic metre = 1000000 cubic millimetres
1 cubic decimetre = 1000 cubic centimetres
1 cubic centimetre = 1000 cubic millimetres

Dry and liquid measure

1 hectolitre = 100 litres
1 litre = 10 decilitres
1 decilitre = 10 centiletres
1 centilitres = 10 millilitres
1 litre = 1 cubic decimetre
1000 litres = 1 cubic metre

Conversion factors

1 cubic yard = 0.7646 cubic metres : 1 cubic metre = 1.308 cubic yards
1 cubic foot = 0.02832 cubic metres : 1 cubic metre = 35.315 cubic feet
1 cubic inch = 16387.064 cubic millimetres : 1 cubic millimetre = 0.00006102 cubic inches
1 cubic foot = 28.137 litres : 1 litre = 0.0353 cubic feet
1 US gallon = 3.785 litres : 1 litre = 0.2642 US gallons
1 UK gallon = 4.5454 litres : 1 litre = 0.22 UK gallons

Velocity / Acceleration

1 mile/hour = 1.4666 feet/sec
1 foot/minute = 0.2 inches/second
1 knot = 1 nautical mile/hour
1 cycle/second = 1 hertz
1 metre/sec = 3.6 kilometres/hour
1 revolution/minute = 0.104 radians/second

(Acceleration) gravity = 9.81 metres/second²

Conversion factors

1 mile/hour = 1.609 kilometres/hour : 1 kilometres/hour = 0.62139 miles/hour
1 foot/second = 0.3048 metres/second : 1 metre/second = 3.2808 feet/second
1 knot = 1.852 kilometres/hour : 1 kilometre/hour = 0.5399 knots

Weight / Mass

Avoirdupois measure

1 gross ton = 1 long ton = 2240 pounds
1 net ton = 1 short ton = 2000 pounds
1 pound = 16 ounces = 7000 grains
1 ounce = 16 drachms = 437.5 grains

1 long ton = 20 hundredweight
1 hundredweight = 4 quarters = 112 pounds
1 quarter = 2 stone = 28 pounds
1 quintal = 100 pounds

Troy weight (measure of gold and silver)

1 pound = 12 ounces = 5760 grains
1 ounce = 20 pennyweights = 480 grains
1 pennyweight = 24 grains
1 carat (diamond) = 3.086 grains

Apothecaries weight

1 pound = 12 ounces = 5760 grains
1 ounce = 8 drachms = 480 grains
1 drachm = 3 scruples = 60 grains
1 scruple = 20 grains

Standard measure
1 tonne = 1 metric ton
1 tonne = 1000 kilograms
1 kilograms = 1000 grams

1 centigram = 10 milligrams
1 decigram = 10 centigrams
10 decigrams = 1 gram
10 grams = 1 dekagram
10 dekagrams = 1 hectogram
10 hectograms = 1 kilogram

Conversion factors

1 long ton = 1.016 tonnes : 1 tonne = 0.9842 tons (long)
1 short ton = 0.9071 tonnes : 1 tonne = 1.1024 tons (short)
1 pound = 0.4536 kilograms : 1 kilogram = 2.2046 pounds (avoirdupois)
1 grain = 0.0648 grams : 1 gram = 15.432 grains

1 grain (avoidupois) = 1 grain (troy) = 1 grain (apothecaries)

Pressure / Force

1 atmosphere = 14696 psi (pound/inch²)
1 psi = 144 pounds/square foot
1 psi = 2.042 inches Hg (mecury) @ 62° F
1 psi = 27.7 inches H2O (water) @ 62° F
megapascal = 1000 kilopascals
1 kilopascal = 1000 pascals
1 bar = 1 megapascal
1 Newton = 1 kilogram x 9.81

Conversion factors
1 atmosphere = 101.325 kilopacsals : 1 kilopascal = 0.00986 atmospheres
1 psi = 6.894 kilopascals : 1 kilopascal = 0.1382 psi

1 kilogram/square millimetre = 1422.32 psi : 1 psi = 0.7031 grams/square millimetre
1 kilogram-metre = 7.233 foot-pounds : 1 foot-pound = 0.1382 kilogram-metres

1 UK tonf = 9.964 kilonewtons : 1 kilonewton = 0.1004 UK ton (force)
1 US tonf = 8.896 kilonewtons : 1 kilonewton = 0.1124 US ton (force)
1 pound(force) = 4.4482 Newtons : 1 Newton = 0.2248 pounds(force)

Time

1 solar year = average interval between 2 successive returns of the sun to the first point of Aries.
1 sireal year = average period of revolution of the Earth with respect to the fixed stars.
1 anomalistic year = average interval between successive perihelions
1 solar year (1 astronomical year) = 365.242 mean solar days
1 sireal year = 365.256 mean solar days
1 anomalistic year = 365.259 mean solar days
1 calendar year = 365.25 mean solar days
1 solar day = interval between 2 successive returns of the sun to the meridian
1 mean solar day = average length of solar day over 1 year
1 second = time equal to the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition of the ground state of the Caesium-133 atom.

1 lustrum = 5 years

Old English standard

1 moment = 1.5 minutes

Work / Energy / Power

1 horsepower/hour = 2545 British thermal units
1 British thermal unit = 778 foot-pounds
1 kilowatt/hours = 3600 kilojoules
1 kilowatt = 1 kilojoule/sec

Conversion factors

1 horsepower/hour = 0.746 kilowatt/hours : 1 kilowatt/hour = 1.34 horsepower/hours
1 horsepower = 746 watts : 1 watt = 0.00134 horsepower
1 British thermal unit = 0.252 calories (kilogram calorie)

Temperature

Boiling point of water = 212° Fahrenheit
Freezing point of water = 32° Fahrenheit
Boiling point of water = 100° Celsius
Freezing point of water = 0° Celsius
1 Celsius degree = 1 Kelvin degree
0 Kelvin = absolute zero

Conversion factors

Fahrenheit to Celsius = (5/9)x(tF-32)
Fahrenheit to Kelvin = (5/9)x(tF + 459.67)
Celsius to Fahrenheit = (9/5 x tC)+32
Celsius to Kelvin = tC + 273.15

India On Rent !

HOW A FORMER “MATH-HATER” BECAME A TOP RANKING MATH TUTOR

It may come as a surprise that I hated math while in school. If I teach it today, then something must have happened. Here is my tale of conquering math anxiety…

From day one, kids in school get drummed into them that teachers know it all. Students don’t dare challenge the teacher and if they are falling behind it’s implied that the fault lies within the student. (My story is on no way intended to bash the teaching profession. There are many, many excellent teachers out there.) But, teachers today are dealing with new challenges such as larger class sizes, condensed curriculum, etc., so less time is spent on assessing the individual’s progress and understanding. This fact, combined with the tendency for kids to avoid questioning teachers on unclear concepts, leads to low self-confidence in the classroom and poor performance.

That was me: afraid to question. And, consequently, my grades suffered.

My teachers (in an expensive private school) taught to the top and ignored the bottom half of the class. Guess where I was? I always sat at the back of class, out of trouble and out of sight. Many, many times, I wanted to ask a question because I was confused. But, my heart would thunder and my stomach would turn at the thought of being ridiculed. Ridicule is a very powerful blunt instrument. So, questions didn’t get asked and there were no answers. According to a series of studies from the American Educational Research Association, only 25% of students asked for help once more, after failing to get an answer to a question on the first attempt.

Math anxiety is very common and can be transferred to students from other classmates or even subconciously passed down from parents. Math anxiety manifests in the classroom because students run the risk of appearing vulnerable in front of their peers – something that we spend our entire adolescence trying to avoid. Class participation for a math class often requires students to rely on memorization, and one person’s ability to recall information differs greatly from person to person- especially when mixed with the pressure to respond quickly and confidently in front of an audience. Another challenge for students is having the confidence to potentially answer a question incorrectly – appear foolish – or inquire further about a concept that is still unclear.

So in my case, pretty much ALL the basic concepts of math were never fully learned, all a vague blur, and I had nowhere to go but down. Math is like a ladder with a bunch of rungs. If the lower rungs are missing, then it’s impossible to climb the ladder. The years rolled on and math became more and more difficult – more and more confusing – and when kids are confused they will do anything to relieve the discomfort. Truth be told – we all do that. As a result, kids will turn away, turn off, make excuses, engage in diversions, blame others, hate math, lie to themselves (and their parents) and sink! They give up hope for the future and resolve that they will never be a “math person.”

I was lucky. My best buddy’s dad was a man I admired greatly. Even at my lowest, he picked me up by the scruff of my neck and gave me a life lesson. All it takes is one person to change your outlook and restore confidence. Specifically, he taught me about belief systems. I believed I was stupid. As a self-fulfilling prophecy it worked beautifully. Everything was hard, nothing was easy, and what the teachers had told me over the years came to be true. I was dumb and the results proved it.

Now, if I teach math today, then something must have happened. Yes, it did. Mr. Brown taught me about my bent beliefs and he persuaded me that the best way to understand math was to try to explain it to other people. My immediate reaction was, “You must be insane! How can I do that?!” But, Mr. Brown insisted and even got me a job as a math teacher! Not just any job, but at a prestigious technical college named after John Napier, the guy who invented logarithms! Scared or not, Mr. Brown pushed me forward and I studied, and I studied, and I studied. Not to pass an exam, but to pass my future students unscathed. After spending the afternoons on intense individual study, I would go to school at night and teach math. Monday through Friday – every night. And, as I was teaching – I found I was really teaching myself.

I finished at my University with 1st Class Honors, and making 100’s became routine – something I would have never thought possible. Once I abandoned my fear of asking questions and focused on learning concepts rather than relying on memorization, no exam question could rattle my cage and there was no more exam anxiety. I became comfortable confronting the things I was unclear on, and admitting openly when I needed help. One-on-one learning is a life-time opportunity – once students find comfort and are at ease in being open and honest about their shortcomings, they open the door to REAL learning.

After one year of this intense study and clarification in my mind, I discovered that, without my perceived pressure of a classroom full of peers waiting to judge my performance, all the basic concepts were actually very straightforward and made perfect sense.

Don’t we ALL like stuff when we – are – good – at – it? I came to really enjoy math – because I – was – good – at – it.

Genius? Me!? No way!! I just did what had to be done. Period.

No more doubts, no more fear, and no more exam anxiety.

Lessons:

  • The faster you admit that you “don’t get it” the sooner you WILL.
  • It’s ok to ask for help from others. ASK QUESTIONS!
  • We can ALL be “Math People.”
  • Study time is a must. NO excuses.
  • Believe you can – and you can! Telling yourself you NEVER will is setting yourself up for failure.

R. Bruce Neill has been a tutor on WyzAnt since February 2011, and provides online lessons. SEND AN EMAIL to R. Bruce today to inquire about availability. Since joining the site, he has taught over 900 hours and received 450 star ratings. His reviews are overwhelmingly positive and one students goes as far as to call him a “math genius!” He tutors in Math, Pre-Algebra, Algebra I and II, Geometry, Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Microsoft products, Mac, Physics, SAT, ACT, Language Arts, Career Development and resumes – even Portuguese!

OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET FOR STUDIES

Educational Resources

 You can find a lot of fine educational materials available on the internet, however It sometimes takes a while to locate it. These links will lead you to important topics covered in many subjects and training resources which we might be very beneficial to you.

 Open educational resources (OER) are freely accessible, openly licensed documents and media that are useful for teaching, learning, and assessing as well as for research purposes. It is the leading trend in distance education/open and distance learning domain as a consequence of the openness movement.

There is no universal usage of open file formats in OER.The development and promotion of open educational resources is often motivated by a desire to provide an alternate or enhanced educational paradigm.

  1. Algebra Explorations, Pre-K through Grade 7
  2. Basic Algebra
  3. Basic Algebra Concepts
  4. Algebra 1
  5. Algebra I Teacher’s Edition
  6. Algebra 2
  7. Basic Geometry
  8. Basic Geometry, Teacher’s Edition
  9. Basic Geometry Concepts
  10. Geometry
  11. Geometry, Teacher’s Edition
  12. CK-12 Trigonometry Concepts
  13. Trigonometry
  14. Trigonometry, Teacher’s Edition
  15. Basic Probability and Statistics – A Short Course
  16. Basic Probability and Statistics – A Full Course
  17. CK-12 Basic Probability and Statistics Concepts – A Full Course
  18. CK-12 Advanced Probability and Statistics Concepts
  19. Probability and Statistics (Advanced Placement)
  20. Advanced Probability and Statistics Teacher’s Edition
  21. Calculus
  22. Calculus, Teacher’s Edition
  23. Basic Physics
  24. CK-12 People’s Physics Concepts
  25. Physics – From Stargazers to Starships
  26. 21st Century Physics
  27. Chemistry
  28. Chemistry, Teacher’s Edition
  29. Chemistry – Labs & Demos
  30. Biology
  31. Biology Workbook
  32. Biology, Teacher’s Edition
  33. Life Science for Middle School
  34. Earth Science Concepts
  35. Earth Science for Middle Schools
  36. Earth Science for High Schools
  37. Engineering – An Introduction for High School
  38. Adventure Stories
  39. Africa
  40. Anthropology
  41. Archaeology
  42. Best Books Ever Bookshelf
  43. Biographies
  44. Children’s Book Series
  45. Children’s Fiction
  46. Children’s Literature
  47. Classical Era Collection
  48. Detective Fiction
  49. Fantasy Collection
  50. Folklore
  51. Gothic Fiction
  52. Harvard Classics Collection
  53. History For Children
  54. Horror Fiction
  55. Mystery Fiction
  56. Native America
  57. One Act Plays
  58. Philosophy
  59. Poetry
  60. School Stories
  61. Science Fiction
  62. Short Stories
  63. Libros en Español
  64. Westerns

 

Encyclopedia – Wikipedia Selection

  1. Art
  2. Business Studies
  3. Citizenship
  4. Countries
  5. Everyday life
  6. Design and Technology
  7. Geography
  8. History
  9. IT
  10. Language and Literature
  11. Mathematics
  12. Music
  13. People
  14. Portals
  15. Religion
  16. Science

 

U.S.National Library of Medicine

  1. Medical Encyclopedia (S.National Library of Medicine)

 

Hesperian Health Guides: (Hesperian)

  1. Where There Is No Doctor. A village health care handbook.
  2. Where There Is No Dentist
  3. Where Women Have No Doctor
  4. Disabled Village Children
  5. Women with Disabilities – A Health Handbook
  6. A Book for Midwives: Care for pregnancy and birth
  7. Helping Children Who Are Deaf
  8. Helping Children Who Are Blind
  9. Cholera Prevention Fact Sheet
  10. Sanitation and Cleanliness for a Healthy Environment
  11. Water for Life – Community water security
  12. A Community Guide to Environmental Health
  13. Helping Health Workers Learn

 

OLPC Educational Packages

  1. Storybooks
  2. Web Design
  3. Wikibooks
  4. Wikislice General
  5. Wikislice Animals

100.WikiHow

101.Biology

102.Wikislice Chemistry

103.Wikislice Physics

104.Nature Photographs

105.World Culture

106.Music Samples

107.How to Build Musical Instruments

108.y-Bee-See – An interactive ABC picturebook

109.A compact multilingual translation dictionary

110.Primary Mathematics in English

111.Primary Science in English

112.Secondary Science in English

113.School Management in English

114.HIV/AIDS Electronic Library – resource for teachers

Mathematics / Typing / Music lessons

115.MathExpression Math Video Lessons, Tips and Practice, from Wei  Chong

116.Typing Practice

117.Music Theory Lessons, from musictheory.net

A CHECKLIST FOR TEACHING SCIENCE SUBJECTS EFFECTIVELY IN NIGERIAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

MASON COLLEGE SCIENCE TEACHER SUBMITS SEMINAR REPORT ON “EFFECTIVE METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE” A LECTURE GIVEN BY MR.ATOKARA DANIEL (A GUEST SPEAKER FROM GHANA)

INTRODUCTION

He defined effective method as the art of teaching science such that students will be able to get the content of the teaching, and the teaching will in turn reflect on students’ behavior.He defined science as a way of explaining the universe in which we live in. He also stated that science is a body of knowledge and a process of acquiring knowledge.

The fundamental knowledge in scientific principles by “Marvin Druger” were given as;
(1)Science might be taught in an integrative manner.
(2)Changes in the science teacher preparation. That is the teacher should adopt different teaching formats, this will serve as a challenge to the students.
(3)Focus on students’ motivation.
(4)An active student involvement in the learning. In this case the teacher is expected to carry the students along as he teaches.

He then highlighted the various methodologies of teaching science effectively coupled with relevant check lists. He explained that the importance of the checklist is to guide the teacher on his presentations.

METHOLOGY OF TEACHING SCIENCE EFFECTIVELY:

a.The Use Of Chalkboard:

-This is to illustrate, outline or underscore ideas in written or graphic forms.In using the chalkboard facts that cannot be picked by students during the teacher’s explanation might be seen more clearly by students

-Relevant checklist applicable to the Chalkboard were given as follows…The teacher must;

-Say what he/she has to say before writing them on the board.
-Use keywords or concepts.
-Be aware of the organization of ideas on the board.
-Erase the board before writing a new concept, idea or diagram.
-Write legibly and large enough to be easily read.

b.Demonstration

-He said this can be used to teach concepts or skills directly or to prepare students for laboratory work, he further explained that this will also provide the students opportunity to see a phenomenon or event that they otherwise would not have observed.
-The following checklists were also given on demonstration.He said that the teacher must;

-Be sure that the students can see and hear clearly.
-Do the demonstration on his own before trying it in front of students.
-Take all necessary precautionary/safety measures,for example making sure all windows are opened.
-Plan his demonstration so that it clearly shows the intended concepts or skills.

c.Field Trip

-The speaker described a field trip as a unique learning experience that cannot be accomplished in classrooms.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Take the trip first before going with the students.
-Prepare the students for the trip by determining their objectives and general expectations.
-Make proper transportation arrangements.
-Confirm prior arrangements for admission.
-Obtain permission slips from parents or guardians
-Arrange for additional adult colleagues of opposite gender to come along.

d.Laboratory

-He said that the laboratory gives the students unique experiences on the actual use of equipment and materials as they resolve problems and develop knowledge,skills and values related to effective science teaching and learning.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Select a laboratory that best illustrates his objectives.
-Make necessary changes in the physical arrangement of the laboratory.
-Be sure that materials needed for the practicals are available and functional.
-Give clear, succinct directions including safety precautions,how to handle equipments, where to obtain materials, assignment of groups and also expectations of conduct and reporting.

e.Laboratory Report

-He stated that this will formalize the students’ laboratory experience and make connections between prior and present knowledge.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Involve students in report writing.
-Outline expectation in terms of length, format and thoroughness.
-Review the students report.

f.Film Shows/Classroom Computer & 1CT Devices (Devices)

-He said these will present information in an interesting and efficient manner.

-Checklist: The teacher must;

-Preview the Devices before showing/using them to/in the class
-Decide where the Devices can best fit in the instructional sequence
-Outline some introductory remarks.
-Ensure that the students concentrate on knowing how devices work and in knowning why they are relevant.
-At times pause Devices and have brief discussions where necessary, but not to be done too repeatedly.
-Conduct a discussion after the Devices come to an end.
-Entertain questions from students and make connections between content in Devices and the students’ previous knowledge and relevance for future topics.

g.Lecture

-This is used to present a large body of information.

-Checklist: In doing the teachers is expected to;

-Be sure that the lecture is organized, use an outline and make it available before or during the lecture.
-Supplement lectures with slides and/or charts to illustrate concepts and ideas.
-Monitor students’ attention and relate previous knowledge with the present one to widen students understanding.
-Talk clearly and in a manner that clarifies key points and facilitate note taking.

h.Questioning:

-This stimulates thinking more effectively by a 2-way communcation between the teacher and students

-Checklist: The teacher must;

-Use variety of questions to test if the students have actually gained from the teaching.
-Outline expectation in terms of length, format and thoroughness.
-Provide time for the students to think about answers or questions
-Use questions that require thinking at different levels for instance recall, comprehension, application, analysis and evaluation.

Good luck.

THE MEMORABLE MOMENTS OF A LIFE COACH NO 4

“Whoever you are, there is some younger person who thinks you are perfect.
There is some work that will never be done if you don’t do it.
There is someone who would miss you if you were gone.
There is a place that you alone can fill.”…Jacob M. Braude

I got visited a few months ago by one of my old students. It was a visit made almost after 21 yrs because he passed out of PASS TUTORIAL COLLEGE in 1995. Since then he attended Yaba Tech, Unilag and did his Masters in England. Today he runs his own oil and gas company based around the Ikeja-Berger axis.

So what was special about the visit? He said since he came back from England he had intended to look for me to say thank you for the way his life was changed at the Tutorial School. He said before he came to the school his father had lost hope on him because of his careless attitude towards education.

He said they were living at Olodi – Apapa and that it was a friend of his father who told him about PASS in Festac. He said despite that his old man was not interested but that it was his mother who brought him to PASS and that he remembered me from the first day he was registered.

He said that even when he changed the father still suspected him of pretense till the day of his graduation from Unilag. He said it was at the end of the ceremony after the father saw his name on the list of graduating students that he stretched out his hands to shake him and told him that he should read further.

He said when he got to England was when he saw the practical demonstration of similar methods used by teachers for them as was done in PASS. He said Unilag lecturers acted like demi-gods but he experienced life coaching again in England the way PASS TUTORIAL COLLEGE did it for them in those days.

So he decided that one day he would leave his workers behind in the office and tell them he was going to look for one Mr. Odumosu in Festac Town. He did not get the address in full but he knew it was somewhere on 5th Avenue so he decided to check me up by going into each close on the avenue asking residents if they knew my close! He was lucky someone in the second close he entered told him my exact address and he came directly.

When we met I could not really recognize him. You can imagine the changes after 21 yrs that would have come upon a boy who was 16 or 17 years old. He was well-dressed, with nicely cut hair and trimmed beard. Nice car too. He told me the methods used for them at PASS were completely different from what was used for them throughout his six years in his secondary school.

And me? I marveled at the strength of the bond a teacher can create with students if he is truly interested in their lives. Many tutors do not seem to know the existence or power of this bond. It was the same bond that made me call my secondary school Mason College almost 27 yrs after I met Revered Donald Mason at Christ’s School Ado-Ekiti. It is the same bond that makes me still posting articles till tomorrow about Reverend Ogunlade (Otura) who took over from Rev Mason after his retirement.

I thanked him for his decision to seek me out and the sacrifice to leave his work and workers behind just to pay me a visit. I also thanked God for what PASS did in his life. As usual my remark was that nothing could have been achieved by me or the school if God had not put the ability in him to “come to himself”through his DNA.

I also told him as I wish to remind any teacher reading this today that we teachers are specially anointed gardeners in God’s garden. No pastor or reverend or shepherd can keep students in the same place from 8 am to 3 pm daily,Monday to Friday. It is only a school and its group of teachers who can.

As a teacher you would have completely missed the road if you think your only concern is to teach subjects allocated to you through the school’s time table. In most schools there are many interfaces for interaction with students outside boxes called classrooms. No matter how short a time you spend with students in any school make sure they can remember your work in their lives 21 years later. My visitor spent only 9 months in PASS from October 94 to June 95 but he came looking for the “Director” in 2016!

This is another experience of mine as as a life coach. Please look closely at yourselves now and what you think you can do for those children who are with you today before it’s too late.All the so-called small children with me in those days have grown up to be papas and mamas too.Those small eyes in your classrooms today,sometimes excited and sometimes afraid, will remember u someday and will decide whether u are worth remembering at all not to talk about leaving their work behind to plod through Lagos traffic just to greet you.

But in the case i just narrated was it greetings with an ordinary handshake?…Lets leave that one out for now….hahaha!

This is my 4th story of the series meant to encourage teachers.The other 3 are on my FB wall.Please have a nice day and thanks for reading

10 FUNNY INTER-HOUSE SPORT COMPETITIONS TO ADD COLOR TO YOUR EVENT

Inter house sports competition is one of the outside classroom activities that is found in schools curriculum; both at the primary and secondary levels. In spite of the fact that inter house sport tournaments focuses on showcasing students athletic talents (among other things); it can also be a very funny and laughter inducing event.

Here are few of the funny or comical races that you can find in an inter-house sport tournament which normally make spectators laugh their ribs out.

1) Staff Race: This is a race which involves all the staff of an institution coming to the track to run. The funny part of this race is that both slim and fat both fit and unfit are involved.

2) Old Boys/Girls Race: This is a race which involves all the alumni of a particular school coming to the track to run. The funny part of this race is that it is similar to the Staff Race.

3) Threading The Needle: This is also another event at an inter-house sport that can turn out to be very funny; it has to do with contestants passing some certain amount of thread through needles.

4) Wheeling The Tyre: Okay, seriously, this always turns out to be very funny, most especially when contestants tyres run into each other’s tracks causing obstructions. Abandoned vehicle tyre or that of motorcycle are used in such race; very funny though.

5) Catching The Train: It is still very hard to conclude which is the funniest between Catching The Train and The Skipping Race.

6) The Skipping Race: It involves each contestant with skipping rope in hand, skipping towards the finished line.

7) The three Legged Race: In this kind of race, two contestants belonging to the same team have one person’s right leg tied to the other person’s left leg, other teams to participate in the three legged race must do the same that the contestants can run with three legs.

8) The Lime and Spoon Race: In this funny race, each contestant will run to the finished line with a lime placed in a spoon.

9) The Sack Race: Contestants stand in a sack and once they hear the shot of the starting gun, they begin to run while in the sack and funny part of it is that the lack room in the sack to pace the leg makes many contestants fall many times before the end of the race.

10) The Candle Race: Here, the contestants walk rather than run. They hold a lit candle in hand and guard it from the breeze while they walk carefully to the finished line because a blown off candle disqualifies a contestant from the race.

Posted by Naija Samuel on Nairaland

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10 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT EDUCATION IN NIGERIA

1.That government is doing something about revival of a reading culture

2.That just having libraries in schools will improve educational standards without a deliberate program of use.

3.That the internet has created a phobia for reading by students.Big lie they now read more through their phones even if what they read is Facebook and Twitter.

4.That importation of foreign educational systems by Nigerian governments is bad

5.That there is a real class of “stakeholders” in Education in Nigeria

6.That teachers were good because they were better trained.

7That educational standards of today’s graduates is nothing to write home about.

8.That educating children is an investment for parents’ rainy days

9.That students were more serious in the past than today.

10.Many feel the goals/objectives of teaching are still the same as those of many years ago.

PLEASE ASK US FOR MORE NOTES ON ANY OF THESE IF YOU WISH.THANK YOU.

REFERENCE WEBSITES/RESOURCES ON AUTISM FOR PARENTS AND TEACHERS

http://beyondautismawareness.wordpress.com/2013/04/04/the-12-myths-of-autism/

http://www.everydayhealth.com/autism/six-common-myths.aspx

http://velociriot.org/2013/04/05/autism-speaks-doesnt-speak-for-autism/

http://minasaksham.wordpress.com/2013/04/03/autism-is-not-a-disease/

http://mypicturedmoments.com/2013/04/01/what-does-the-autism-spectrum-look-like/

http://autismandoughtisms.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/101-on-autism-diversity-for-autism-awareness-day/

GREAT AUTISM BLOGS ( supplied autism and oughtism)

30 Days of Autism
Adasperdown Town
Adventures in Extreme Parenthood
Asperger’s Diary
Autism and Empathy
Autism Army Mom
Autism from a Father’s Point of View
Autism Jabberwocky
Autism News Beat
Autism Research Australasia
Autism Science Foundation
Autism’s Gadfly
autismjungle
Countering…
Cracking the enigma
Facing Autism in New Brunswick
Friendship Circle – Special Needs Blog
Harpocrates Speaks
Homestyle Mama (with a side of autism)
Interverbal (inactive blog)
Job Sink (inactive blog)
Journeys with Autism (inactive blog)
Just a Lil Blog
Kazbrooksblog
Kitaiska Sandwich
Left Brain/Right Brain
Life is a Spectrum
Matter Tomorrow
Matty Angel
MOM-Not Otherwise Specified
My Whac-A-Mole Life
On the Spectrum
onthebeans
Out of the Fog
Questioning Answers
Raising Asperger’s Kids
Science 2.0 : ASD
seventhvoice
SFARI
Snagglebox
Solodialogue
Speaking on the Spectrum
Special Education Law Blog
stark. raving. mad. mommy.
thAutcast.com
The Autism Crisis
The Fragile X Files
The Simple Life (inactive blog)
The Tumultuous Truth
The Voyage
Yeah. Good Times

IKEJA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL GETS NEW LIBRARY


The importance of a well-equipped school library to quality education was recently underscored when a Lagos-based organisation donated new library to Ikeja Senior High School, Ikeja. Olaseni Durojaiye writes

The school library is not integral to learning; it is the heart of the school as it aides both teaching and learning which explains why it is pivotal to developing the 21st Century learners as it provides a model for inquiry learning and building knowledge and confidence in seeking and processing information. Interestingly, there is a growing body of proofs showing the impact of the school library on students’ academic development and achievement.

Besides benefits to students, a well-equipped library is a fundamental resource centre that also provides support for the teaching staff. Scholars hold the view that a school library reflects and encourages collaborative learning and sharing of ideas just as research shows that the reading scores for students in schools that focus on improving their library programmes are, on average of eight to 21 per cent, higher than similar schools with no such programmes.

As important as school libraries are to learning and teaching, the state of libraries in public school leaves much to be desired. While some schools lack well-equipped libraries, others simply do not have. Many schools boast of reading room in the name of library as many of the libraries are too small and often congested making them not conducive for learning.

This was the case with the school library at Ikeja Senior High School, Ikeja, Lagos before the intervention by X3M Ideas, a Lagos-based advertising agency which decided to donate a well-equipped library to the school as part of its yearly corporate social responsibility (CSR) programme.

THISDAY gathered that, before the new library was renovated, equipped and handed over to the school management for the use of the school community, the school shared a single room library with Ikeja Junior High School. It was further gathered that the former library was too small to adequately serve the two schools and lacked enough text book resources to cater for the study needs of the students from the two schools that it was meant for.

That has however become history with the donation of the new library by X3M Ideas.
The new library comes with comfortable, four student apiece workstation-like study desks. Each unit has spacious leg room and wide enough table-top that affords convenient reading. Besides, the demarcation at the top of the table forecloses distraction, interferences from other users on the unit and, affords personal space and some measure of privacy.

A tour of the library revealed well stocked book shelves and well arranged seating arrangement. The books and text books on display cut across different subjects from arts, commercial and science subjects. The books bore subjects like agriculture, biology, chemistry, additional mathematics, commercial studies, home economics, integrated science, literature and physics among others.

The Librarian’s table is strategically positioned directly opposite the entrance to the library. A desktop computer monitor and keyboards seat on the table while the Central Processing Unit sits below the table top. From the vantage position, the librarian is able to monitor goings on inside the hall.

A staff of the Ad agency who craved anonymity told THISDAY that “We always put our CSR project in the budget every year, and then we begin to save towards it from the beginning of the year. It’s a tough choice especially at this moment of technical recession and when other agencies are cutting cost and downsizing; but our CEO believes that it’s a choice that must be made. Whenever he talks about the projects he’ll ask us which is the better choice; should people consider how hard it is to spend the money on such laudable project or how harder the future of those children will be without quality education.”

While performing the official tape cutting to declare the library open for use, Tutor-General and Permanent Secretary, District Six, Lagos State Ministry of Education, Mrs. Amidat Anifowoshe, commended the donor company and praised its courage to commit to the project at a time the nation’s economy was experiencing a downturn and businesses are cutting costs as against incurring more cost.

But it was the narratives of the school’s Principal, Mrs. Ibidun Olawuyi that best captured the mood of the school community. Her narration recalled how the library came to be:

“Since I was posted to this school as the Principal, having a befitting library has been a burden in my heart. The school shares the existing so called library with junior school and this had made it difficult for an effective use of the library by both the students and staff of the school. Today, I thank God; that burden has been lifted and we now have a well furnished library for the school, all courtesy of X3M Ideas Company,” she stated.

Continuing, Mrs. Olawuyi recalled how the project came about thus: “It all started in June upon my resumption from a casual leave when the Vice Principal Academics came to brief me that a young man named Nnamdi Okeke came to the school and asked what the school lacked with a view to assisting. According to her, she told him of the needs for computers and a school library. I immediately took the offer of a school library.

“Nnamdi came back as promised and we got talking. Like a dream come true here we are today, inaugurating the library. I want to express my heartfelt gratitude to God Almighty, who sees and grants hearts desires as He has by this granted one of my desires for the school. I also want to express my profound appreciation to the management and owners of X3M Ideas for promising and fulfilling the promises so promptly that it seem like a dream. The whole project took about two months to complete and I am aware it costs millions of naira,” the Principal recounted.

Speaking with THISDAY shortly after a tour of the newly inaugurated library, Chief Executive Officer of X3M Ideas, Steve Baba-Eko, explained that the project was borne out of the conviction that providing the students with quality education is the best way of guiding them to become good citizens and leaders in future.

“We are doing this because providing quality education for the children is the best way to groom quality future leaders. Education saved people like me. Why I am able to be where I am today or do what we’re doing today is because I am educated.

“Today, anybody can get educated. However; it’s not just about education but the quality of the education. That was why we decided that in our own little way we will meet the government of Lagos State or any other state halfway in the provision of quality education for our youth, especially those in secondary schools because if we fail to do so the quality of leaders that we will have in future may not be what we will be proud of,” he explained.

Speaking further, he stressed “Last year we went to the boys’ reformatory home, we looked at their sanitary system, you cannot reform anybody in those conditions, so we provided them with a brand new toilets system, new bathrooms complete with lighting systems. We are not just talking to children from well off home or school, we are also talking to children from indigent homes and who are in conflict with the society. So we shall continue to find new ways of engaging with them from different backgrounds,“ he concluded.

Some of the students who braved the ongoing end of session holiday to grace the inauguration could not hide their elation. The joy they exuded can be likened to that of a traveler in the desert – travel weary, tired and thirsty – then came upon an oasis.

One of the students, Elizabeth Ayodele, captured the mood of her colleagues in her vote of thanks. “On behalf of the students of Ikeja Senior High School, I say a big thank you our donor, X3M Ideas for the new school library. The well-equipped library will be of immense benefits to the student population. It will enhance our reading culture and have great impact on the academic performance of the students. I promise that we are going to make effective use of the library. Once again, thank you X3M Ideas, and may God Almighty in His infinite mercies continue to bless the company,” she said.

The teachers were not left out in the gale of excitement in the schools. One of them told THISDAY that “Students and their teachers need library resources and the expertise of a librarian to succeed. School libraries help teachers teach the children better because we are able to go in there to research; sometimes too we ask the students to go in there and read up some topic then return to the class room to engage in interactive session.

A school library functions like a resource centre that supports school programmes as well as the teaching and learning process. School libraries serve students by providing materials to meet their various needs and encouraging independent reading and the use of libraries,” she stressed, adding that “That’s why we are so delighted. We’re indeed grateful to XTM Ideas for this donation; it will certainly impact our work and the performances of the students going forward,” she stated.

Source: Ikeja Senior High School Gets New Library | THISDAYLIVE

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THE NEW SCHOOL CURRICULUM…BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE GUARDIAN

It is clear from the frightening noise over the newly publicised revised basic education curriculum review that the exercise is too important to be handled in a slipshod manner by a federal government agency without adequate consultation with all the stakeholders, especially parents and the federating states of Nigeria. The exercise being spearheaded by the Federal Ministry of Education in Abuja through its agency, Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC) should be discontinued forthwith because the rationalisations by the Council so far have been more than puerile and the exercise will not serve any public good.

There is no doubt that curriculum review is a necessity but the review needed in this country now is one that should go beyond what is currently being proposed. In other words, the character and content of the current exercise will not lead to development of human capital Nigeria urgently needs for sustainable development.

In the new system developed by the Nigerian Education Research and Development Council (NERDC), which has been touted by its promoters as “intended to be in tandem with international models,” Christian Religious Studies (CRS) and Islamic Religious Studies (IRS), which were hitherto taught separately, are now merged under Religious and National Values (RNV). That integration also embodies subjects such as Civic Education, Social Studies and Security Education. Although government has been curiously taciturn about further details, since the revelation of the integrated Religious and National Values (RNV) complications, adherents of the two major religions in the country and some outraged parents have been expressing negative sentiments. Even public commentators have made calls on government to cancel the new curriculum review. While most skeptics are still wondering why the government would take the people by surprise without due consultation and consideration for fundamental issues such as teacher training for new subjects and throwing in the mix such things as “security education”, the NERDC Executive Secretary, Prof. Ismail Junaid, has sought to allay the fears.

According to the NERDC boss, each of the two religious subjects has been designed to be handled by separate teachers. Curiously, he has blamed what he called “ignorant and greedy publishers” of the text books for the prevailing fuss over the new policy. He said, “in all, we have not changed the contents; the contents are intact…I wouldn’t like to use the word merged, because when you use the word, merging, it would look like you are taking them (religious subjects) as one… As far as the listing is concerned, they (CRS and IRS) are standing as distinct courses, but merged under one subject listing.” He also explained that, “in each of these, we made provisions for periods
to be set aside for teaching CRS, we have periods set aside for IRS, and we have periods set aside for teaching Social Studies. When we developed the curriculum, we also developed the teachers’ guide; and each of these teachers’ guide is separate…”

Expectedly, the present administration has been accused of some hidden agenda in this controversial policy. But the NERDC boss has refuted that, saying that the curriculum was actually reviewed under the immediate past government. He also added that there were consultations with stakeholders and experts before the policy was adopted. But if this was the case, why did the Primate of the Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion) Nicholas Okoh complain that, ‘religion is a very sensitive issue, there is no need to mix Islam with Christianity?” And Secretary-General of the Catholic Bishops Conference too has spoken in a similar vein saying, “we have all sorts of divides, political divides, tribal divides but the religious one is not helping us…”

Despite the claim of consultations, Muslim leaders too are protesting the mixed grill as National Chief Imam, Al-habibiyyah Mosque, Abuja, Ustaaz Fuad Adeyemi said the new education curriculum on religion is a strange policy “that would remove the citizens’ identity as Nigerians.” He then urged government to drop the idea immediately and allow the subjects to remain the way they were.

Meanwhile, the issue is not just about which administration introduced the new curriculum and when. It is about the fact that the people who should benefit from a policy have rejected it outright and this renders any claim of consultation useless at the moment. Times have changed and this is the very first time the policy has been made public. There is no record that parents and other stakeholders were aware of the introduction of the policy since 2012 and 2014 as claimed. Indeed, if the policy framework is that old, why are parents and stakeholders comprising the two major religions diametrically opposed to its introduction? Where and when did the Jonathan government publicly launch the new education policy with such grave implications for national security and development?

All told, the point government has sadly missed in this is that the curriculum Nigeria needs now should be one that is robust and comprehensive enough to trigger national development. Besides, such a review should be left to different states of the federation to handle since education is not on the exclusive legislative list. One of the most frequently discussed concerns in Nigeria today is mismanagement of the nation’s diversity by an over-centralised federal government. Which is why, everyday, there are strident calls on the government of President Buhari to consider the imperative of implementing the 2014 Constitutional Conference Report which has taken care of all these complications in the polity.

Even if any national review of curriculum were to be kick-started, such a review should reflect emphasis on revival of “History”, for instance, as a subject. The implications of scrapping “History” from primary and post-primary school curriculum have been devastating to national identity and memories.

And why should “Security Education” be introduced to Nigerian pupils when there are no teachers to handle such a sensitive subject? “History” as a subject is more important than such frivolity as the nation’s young ones have been made to abandon their rich heritage or culture as embedded in history! A nation loses direction when her children don’t study their past, even the history of vegetation in different regions, herbs that are relevant to natural medicine and all the requisite elements that have always defined Nigeria’s diversity and strength. “Civic Education” too should be expanded to reflect the current reality in the world. It should go beyond current affairs as it should reflect teaching of ethics, etiquette, civic responsibility of individuals and obedience to elders as enshrined in African values. Any new curriculum must be very Nigerian and should teach discipline.

Certainly, Nigeria needs a curriculum review that will recognise all the factors that once made the nation succeed; a curriculum review that will include subjects that enhance entrepreneurship; one that makes for functional education in a way that will involve the use of Nigerian cartoons, audio visuals or software that emphasise our Nigerian-ness. Nigeria needs a curriculum revolution that will trigger education for development.

But how can all of these be achieved without a clear-cut policy framework and a budget for teacher training programme? Nigeria must train the trainers first and the trainers must be part of the best from the nation’s higher schools as it is done in the civilised world. A revival of the old teacher training colleges is, of course, needed. The National Teachers Institute (NTI), Kaduna established in 1981 has proved inadequate for qualitative teacher training. Therefore, since government has started on a wrong premise, it should suspend the new controversial curriculum and restart a process that will lead to a new curriculum that will reflect Nigeria’s need, diversity, culture and, of course, lead to development.

http://guardian.ng/opinion/the-new-school-curriculum/

IKORODU SCHOOL GIRLS’ KIDNAP…QUESTION IS,CAN THE SCHOOL SURVIVE THEREAFTER?

How over 500 security agents rescued Lagos schoolgirls

A huge public outcry and the pressure on security agents may have been contributory factors to the rescue of three female students of Babington Macaulay Junior Seminary in Ikorodu, Lagos State.

The girls — Timilehin Olosa, Tofunmi Popoola and Deborah Akinayo — were kidnapped by gunmen on Monday on their school premises.

PUNCH Metro gathered that they were rescued by policemen and other security operatives at the Imota area of Ikorodu on Sunday.

It was gathered that the public outcry prompted the government to meet the needs of security agencies on the rescue operation, while the Inspector-General of Police, Solomon Arase, sent his special team to Lagos to take over the operation.

The security agents had combed every nook and cranny of the state, especially the Ikorodu area, making the abductors uncomfortable to stay in one place.

Our correspondent was told by one of the security agents involved in the rescue operation that it was discovered that the victims were initially taken to Adamo forest immediately after their abduction.

Adamo forest is across the river in Lugbusi community, where the school is situated in Ikorodu.

The source said, “We gathered that the kidnappers were 12 men, and they came in eight canoes. They used seven AK-47 rifles for the operation.

“One of the men, who we later identified as Lamiameni, brought the kidnapping job to the gang, while another member, known as Felix, alias Tradition, was the one communicating with the families for ransom negotiation.”

Another source said from the forest, the gang moved to a creek, located between Ikorodu and Epe, Lagos State, where they also held the girls.

Security agents were said to have had the first break on March 4, when a suspected kidnapper, Emmanuel Arigidi, aged 37, was sent by the gang from the creeks to buy foodstuffs.

He was said to have bought foodstuffs big enough for an army, which confirmed the suspicion that he was a member of the gang. He was subsequently arrested.

He said, “Arigidi broke down during interrogation and confessed to being a member of the gang that stole the schoolgirls. He gave us the direction to the place they were keeping the girls, and mentioned the names of other members. He even promised to lead the operatives to the location.”

It was gathered that after waiting for Arigidi for two days, the gang sensed that something was amiss and thereafter moved to an area around Igbo Okuta Bridge, Imota, Ikorodu.

It was gathered that possible hiding places had been discussed among the gang members during the planning of the kidnapping.

When security operatives therefore noticed that there were no activities in the creek, they suspected that the gang had fled the area. But Arigidi had no problem in revealing the place they could be.

Also, the relatives of suspected abductors mentioned by Arigidi were said to have been rounded up and made to plead with their people on the telephone to release the girls.

It was learnt that the fathers of two of the suspected kidnappers were allowed on Saturday to go after their sons to talk to them and other gang members to release the girls.

“At about 5am on Sunday, over 500 operatives, comprising the IG team, the Lagos State Police Command and other security agencies stormed Imota and rescued the schoolgirls at the Igbo Okuta Bridge area of Ikorodu,” a source said. Two other suspected kidnappers were arrested during the operation.
Parents rejoicing on the school’s premises
Parents rejoicing on the school’s premises

Another top police source told PUNCH Metro that the family had not paid any ransom before the girls were rescued, adding that creeks in Ikorodu were still being combed for other Arigidi’s gang members.

He said, “The boys (kidnappers) came through the shallow water behind the school with eight canoes and seven AK-47 rifles for the operation and escaped with the kidnapped girls with the same canoes. Arigidi mentioned Clement Abanara, aka Millions, earlier arrested by the IG team, as his boss.”

Another police source, however, said the kidnappers abandoned the girls and fled the scene.

He said, “The arrest of one of Arigidi’s gang members forced other members of the gang to abandon the girls at Imota. Efforts are in progress to arrest the fleeing kidnappers.”

There was disagreement among us

One of the kidnappers of the three abducted schoolgirls, Emmanuel Arigidi, said on Sunday that there was an altercation between him and other 11 members of the gang, which forced him to leave the gang.

Arigidi was paraded on Sunday at the Governor’s Office in Alausa, Ikeja, with two other accomplices — Akanji Sheu and James Henry.

It was gathered that the pupils were rescued by security agents in the Imota area of Lagos.

Arigidi said he opened up to the men of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad, who arrested him in the Majidun area of Ikorodu.

Arigidi, who spoke in pidgin English, explained that he was invited to participate in the abduction by Lamiameni and Felix, who are still at large.

He said, “Lamiameni was the one who brought the deal and we discussed how to carry out the operation at Majidun. We were 12 in number. We went to Maya Bridge to board a canoe and around 8pm, we entered the school and abducted three girls.

“There was a misunderstanding among us on how to keep the girls. I told them I did not like what we had done and we should release the girls because security had become tight and the police were on our trail. But my gang members threatened to kill me. I managed to board a boat and run away from our den. Three days after, SARS arrested me at Majidun and I explained everything to them.”

The two other accomplices, Sheu and Henry, were not allowed to speak with journalists. However, PUNCH Metro managed to speak with Henry before they were taken away in a police van.

Henry said he was a victim of circumstance. He said he helped customers to register their lines in Ikorodu, adding that a line, which he registered, using his photograph, was used by the kidnappers.

It was learnt that the kidnappers had used the line to negotiate ransom with the school and Henry was picked up after the police tracked the number.

He said, “I register SIM lines for customers in Ikorodu. I helped a customer to register his line but after he had left, I discovered that his photograph did not appear on his profile. In an attempt to submit his details, I used my photograph instead. That was how the police traced the line to me. Except the photograph, other details are not mine.”

Schoolgirls healthy, not molested

The Lagos State Commissioner of Police, Fatai Owoseni, said medical treatment carried out on the freed schoolgirls confirmed that they were hale and hearty, adding that the police adopted intelligence-based policing and technology to rescue them.

The CP also dismissed speculations that ransom was paid for the release of the pupils.

“We arrested three suspects. One is actively involved, while the two others are conspirators who, one way or the other, aided the kidnapping. With respect to the health of the girls, they are well, stable and immediate medical attention has been given to them by the police medical team. When we rescued them, one of the questions we asked them was whether they were molested in any way and they stated unequivocally that they were not molested in any way.

“When you talk about ransom in this case, you are glorifying them. We should not be talking about that again in this country. Talking about it means telling people that kidnapping is of value and people can make money from it. What was employed in rescuing the girls is more of application of intelligence-led policing, using the platform of technology and partnering members of the community.

“We mounted pressure on the kidnappers. What we did with other security agencies was that we went for the members of their (kidnappers’) families – the mother, the father and their children and with that pressure, they found that there was no way for them again to keep on to the girls. That was what led to the success of the rescue operation. The girls were rescued around Imota, Lagos.”

Parents celebrate release of schoolgirls

Our correspondent, who managed to gain entrance into the school around 11.30am on Sunday, saw parents celebrating the rescue of the girls, while a thanksgiving prayer session was immediately organised in a church on the school’s premises.

Amid shouts of praises and laughter, some parents were seen hugging one another while the school frontage was filled with cars of parents, who came to celebrate the news.

Security agents were also on the ground.

One of the parents was heard saying, “God, you are marvelous. You are great. We thank you for the protection of these children.”

The school security men subsequently told our correspondent to leave the premises, saying “the management does not want to see journalists for now.”

An official of the school, who did not want his name in print, said, “I have been praying day and night for the safe return of these girls. They were abducted on the last day of February. The following day, I could not say happy new month to people. As far as I am concerned, today (Sunday) marks a new month.”

Some students believed to have been taken away from the school by their parents because of the abduction, were brought back on Sunday.

But a school teacher, who also expressed his happiness over the rescue of the girls, said many of those coming back were students who went to sit for the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination.

“The school is back to life now. I can now go back to the classroom and teach. I am very excited. Academic activities must resume tomorrow (today),” he said.

We will fight all crime

The Lagos State Governor, Akinwunmi Ambode, on Sunday said his administration had the will and capacity to fight all forms of crime and criminality in the state.

He added that kidnappers would find no hiding place in the Lagos.

The governor, who addressed journalists on the safe rescue of the girls, said his administration would spare nothing to clamp down on all forms of crime in the state.

He said, “Let me warn that the state government will not tolerate kidnapping or any form of crime in Lagos.

“Our position is clear and unambiguous; Lagos State has the capacity and the will to go after every form of crime and criminality in order to safeguard lives and property.”

The governor added that he was relieved that the girls were rescued in the early hours of Sunday.

“The three girls have been safely re-united with their families and the government wishes to assure Lagosians that their security is top priority and it will not relent in ensuring that Lagos remains safe and secure,” he said.

Copyright PUNCH.

TEACHER BEHEADS PROPRIETOR’S GRANDDAUGHTER OVER UNPAID SALARIES

A teacher in a private school, Edet Umoren, in Esugbo, Itamerin near Ijebu-Ife, Ijebu East Local Government Area of Ogun State, on Thursday, allegedly beheaded a 10-year-old pupil, Precious Adedeji.

Adedeji, who was a pupil of Favour Nursery and Primary School, was the granddaughter of the proprietor, Pastor Joseph Olitoye.

It was gathered that Umoren allegedly killed the pupil because Olitoye owed him N8, 000 – the suspect’s salaries for January and February.

Umoren, also severed off the right hand of the 10-year-old girl after seizing and dragging her into a nearby bush, a day after her birthday.

The assailant, who was also said to be the treasurer of the school proprietor’s church, was alleged to have seized Adedeji when she and her friend, Patricia, were returning to the school from where they had gone to buy biscuit.

Patricia, it was learnt, escaped from the scene and ran back to the school premises to inform the proprietor of the attack by “Uncle Edet.”

The proprietor said he had pleaded with Umoren to exercise patience till the end of this week to enable him to pay the salaries owed him.

Olitoye disclosed that Umoren left two short notes at the scene of the crime, claiming that he killed the girl because of the failure of the proprietor to pay him his two months’ salaries of N8,000.

He said, “Edet resumed school this morning (Thursday) like every of our staff and we discovered that he left around 10am not knowing he went to plan this evil.”

The distraught Olitoye said he had planned to terminate the appointment of the teacher on Friday over alleged disobedience, which made him to issue him a query before he committed the crime.

He also alleged that the assailant, who until the incident, was the treasurer of his church, had allegedly stolen over N250,000 from the church’s fund.

Confirming the incident, the Police Public Relations Officer, Muyiwa Adejobi, said Umoren had been arrested.

Adejobi, a deputy superintendent of police, said detectives picked up the suspect at about 5am on Friday.

He said the Commissioner of Police, Abdulmajid Ali, had directed that the suspect should be transferred to the State Criminal Investigation Department for investigation.

Copyright PUNCH.

CORONER RULES AGAINST ATLANTIC HALL OVER DEATH OF MASTER TOLUWALOPE ABIODUN

CORONER RULES AGAINST ATLANTIC HALL OVER DEATH OF MASTER TOLUWALOPE ABIODUN

A Lagos coroner has attributed the 2014 death of an 11-year-old pupil of Atlantic Hall, a private school located in Epe area of Lagos, to the negligence of the school authorities.

According to the coroner of the Epe Magisterial District, Olumide-Fusika Adeola, died as a result of asphyxia caused by the aspiration of his stomach contents.

According to the court, on October 3, 2014, Toluwalope was reported to have been involved in a fall at the Junior Boy’s Hostel at Atlantic Hall at about 8pm on the day of the incident.

The coroner said evidence before the court showed that “He was alive at the time of the fall but shortly thereafter lost consciousness and died while being conveyed by the school medical staff in an ambulance from the school clinic to Reddington Hospital at Victoria Island, Lagos and that the deceased was confirmed dead on arrival by the emergency doctor at Reddington Hospital.”

In its verdict delivered on December 18, 2015, Adeola said that he did not personally see the body of the deceased since he had been buried before the inquest commenced and also that the victim’s father, a pathologist and two members of staff of Atlantic Hall had given testimony.

“I also did not deem it necessary to order an exhumation in view of the fact that a post-mortem had already been carried out on the remains of the subject before the burial,” he said.

The coroner ruled that Toluwalope died as a result of, “The failure of the authorities of Atlantic Hall to properly discharge their duty of care to their students as evidenced by the failure to properly monitor the activities of the students and as represented by the lack of training displayed by the first response team to the scene of the injury to the deceased is a contributory factor to the end result of the death of Toluwalope Abiodun.”

Saturday PUNCH learnt that the Lagos State Office of the Public Defender waded into the case of Toluwalope’s death after his family and the school became embroiled in a bitter battle over who is to blame for the boy’s death.

Copyright PUNCH.

WHY I PREFER TO EXPLORE SHORT STORIES – OSONDU

WHY I PREFER TO EXPLORE SHORT STORIES – OSONDU

Epaphras Chukwuenweniwe Osondu simply known as EC Osondu is a Nigerian writer, now resident in the United States of America. He is known for his short stories. His story Waiting won the 2009 Caine Prize for Africa writing. He had previously won the Allen and Nivelle Galso Prize for fiction. His story, A Letter From Home, made the top ten stories in the internet in 2006. His first short story collection is entitled Voice of America. Today he has a novel, This House is Not For Sale. A former fellow at the Syracuse University in Creative Writing, he is at the moment a Professor of Literature at Providence College, Rhode Island, U. S. A. He told Edozie Udeze in this interaction how short story writing has become a way of life for him and lots more.

How do you write?

How do I write? Oh, I write first by hand and then I type into my computer. That is the safest way for me. Sometimes too I write by hand and leave it there. Every morning I take a walk, a long walk early in the morning within my area of residence. And when I come back, both my body, my mind and my brain are so agile that I have one or two ideas to put down. This condition also propels me to want to write.

And also when I write, I use a pen and when I am done with it, I can make it into a bigger story. I hope that is what you mean by how do you write? When I finally feed it into the computer, it is assumed that the greater portion of it is accomplished; the story is made.

At what point did you decide to be a writer?

Em, I think for most people the progression is the same. First, you are a reader; you love reading and you expose yourself to so many books. And then, thereafter, you become a writer. You may become a reader at a very young age. I started reading children books very early before I progressed to adult books. Books like Treasure Island became for me an ideal fantasy for my young mind. When I read Treasure Island, it transported me into the deeper realm of the world. The way the children in the book reacted to situations and all that – those touched me immensely and began to open my mind to other options and possibilities.

It is like you can talk to your mother like an equal. I liked that a lot. And so that pulled me into the world of literature. And the more you read, the more you want to start writing. You cannot write what you do not know.

What genre of literature do you prefer?

You know, I love short stories a lot, they open my eyes to a lot of possibilities. I like reading short stories and knowing what happens in the end and how the writer manages the characters and the plots and the theme. Besides, I love to read poetry, to see how words are contrived in limited space to give meaning to the world.

Poetry has discipline in terms of the usage of language. But then, I love novels, I read novels a lot too. These are forms that transport you into the world of reality and make-believe. Oh, generally, I love books; oh yes, I love books. I love books a lot.

Who are your favourite authors in the world?

Oh, so many, too many. It depends on where I am. At different points in time, the circumstances of the place and who the author is draw me closer to him. There is a book by a Portuguese writer who once won the Nobel Prize for Literature; I love his books. His name is Sharo Nado. I also love Hemingway a lot, both the way he conceives his ideas and then the way he plots the stories to send a lot of messages into the heart of the reader.

I like Hemingway, he is in his own class just the way George Orwell is also a great writer who conceives ideas in forms different from others. Orwell takes me deeper into those realms of fantasies and dreams. If you go through his books, if you take your time to navigate into his world of fantasies, you’ll see how the world can be recreated in most of his works. Such authors move you; they propel your imaginations beyond the limit, beyond human comprehension.

If you met any of your favourite authors what would you ask him or her?

How much did you get from your last book? People think, and most often too, that writers only need to write but shouldn’t think of money. In fact, most times I discover that writers themselves do not seem to be concerned about money. This is not good enough. You need money; you need to gain from your efforts. Why wouldn’t a writer gain from his sweat? So, I will ask him this and let me see how he reacts to it or what he has to tell me.

How do you arrange your library?

My library is not well-arranged. No it is not. There are books pilling up everywhere in the house. From the floor to top. In fact, the ones on the floor are among the books I like to read everyday. These books are pretty around me and I can easily reach out to pick them to read. And then members of my family keep complaining that I want to turn every part of my house to a library. I go to the toilet, there is a book there. Even in my bedroom, there are books all over the place.

So, they always complain; like they’d always say to me, leave these books in your study; oh, leave them there. Keep your books in your study and stop littering this home with books. That’s the way it has always been in my home.

What was the last book you read?

The last book I read is a book called Amongst The Women written by an Irish author by name John Mcharry. It is shows how human society is and how it should be run. It is a book that is set in Island, about the man and his children. It shows both how the father was both benevolent and dictatorial in character and in his approach to issues.

What is the next book you intend to read?

Oh sure, it is a book of short stories called Home and Abroad. My next book too, the one I am working on now, is a collection of short stories. After my first novel, This House is Not For Sale, my intention is to write another collection of short stories which will be ready not too far from now.

http://thenationonlineng.net/why-i-prefer-to-explore-short-stories-osondu/

MOST EXPENSIVE SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN NIGERIA WITH MIND BLOWING FEES! (4)

CONTINUED FROM LAST POST

7. Whiteplains British School, Abuja – N3.6 million

Address: Beside Guardian House, Obafemi Awolowo Way, District, Jabi, Abuja
Website: whiteplainsschool.com

Whiteplains British School is an exclusively unique school that intends to provide an international, inclusive collaborative learning community that merges the academic rigour of the British National Curriculum with the inquiry based approach of teaching and learning as expounded by Edexcel and Cambridge accreditation. It costs about N3.6 million per annum to cater for the tuition and boarding of a child. On entering the school premises, one could certainly be able to guess what having a child there would mean.

6. Day Waterman College, Abeokuta – N3.7 million

Address: Abeokuta – Sagamu Expressway, Asu Village Road, Abeokuta – Ogun State
Website: dwc.org.ng

Just as I said earlier, the 3 popular cities in Nigeria are not absolutely in monopoly of these expensive schools. With the look of things, and the high quest for quality education, these kind of schools will soon be scattered all over the country. Day Waterman College is located along Abeokuta – Sagamu Expressway, Asu Village Road, Abeokuta – Ogun State, Nigeria. It is a modern co-educational boarding school designed to provide an exciting learning environment for secondary school children. The environment offers world-class facilities, a natural, peaceful and focused setting. One of the things that make the school not yet known to so many people is definitely the cost. You should never forget the fact that training a child in school does not mean providing the tuition only. There are so many other things that have to be taken care of for the general welfare of the child which may as well cost as good as the tuition. Well, it’ll take just a few millions to meet up with the demands of Day Waterman college.

5. Lekki British International High School, Lagos – N4 million

Address: Victoria Arobieke Street, off Admiralty Way, Lekki Phase 1, Lagos.
Website: lekkibritishschool.org

Lekki British School is the original British School in Nigeria which was established in the year 2000. The school supplies the needs of each student. They provide everything that is of international standard as well as creating a conducive environment to encourage a balanced pursuit of study and recreation. Lekki British Senior boasts some of the finest educational facilities in West Africa. All classrooms and laboratories are fully air-conditioned. The hostels have excellent facilities including fully air-conditioned dormitories and a well equipped common room with cable television video and other recreational facilities. The tuition really equals with the facilities. They pay as much as $19,500 + N200,000 development fee. In naira, a student pays N4,000,300 per session including feeding, school uniforms, hostel, Sunday wears and textbooks.

4. American International School, Abuja – N4.3 Million

Address: Durumi, Abuja
Website: http://www.aisabuja.com

The American International School, located at Drumi area in the Federal capital Territory of Nigeria is an American-accredited international school that has been open since 1993. It is truly an international school with over 30 nationalities represented in the students’ population. The tuition fee per annum is $20,970.00. Other fees such as Application fee, Capital building fee, Annual development fee, etc, sum up to the grand total above. Only the very rich could afford education in this school, and that clearly explains why they currently have just about 500 students from Pre-School to Grade 12.

3. British International School, Lagos – N4.48 million

Address: Muri Okunola Street, Landbridge Avenue, Oniru Private Estate, Victoria Island, Lagos.
Website: bisnigeria.org

The British International School is a multinational co-educational English medium school established in September 2001. It boasts of excellent facilities which include a multi-purpose hall, music suites, theatre, computer suites, science suites, tutorial rooms, swimming pool and many more. Parents pay their children’s tuition fees in dollars but going by Nigerian currency, each student pays N4,480,000 annually. This also includes their feeding, uniforms, textbooks, etc. The subject policies contain the National Curriculum for England requirements with slight modifications to reflect the international setting. Support teachers are also available to help those pupils whose level of English is below average. This school is majorly patronized by foreigners, but of course there are still a good number of Nigerian students there.

2. Grange High School, Lagos – N4.5 million

Address: No. 6, Harold Shodipo Crescent, GRA Ikeja, Lagos
Website: http://www.grangeschool.com

The Grange Secondary School was established with the aim of providing qualitative British education in a happy, caring and supportive environment. It provides a learning environment where children feel valued and are treated with dignity. The school is one of only three in Nigeria to be accredited by the Uk’s Independent Association of Preparatory Schools. (IAPS). I need not tell long stories here because this is the 2nd most expensive secondary school in Nigeria. If you are interested in the school, I think the best thing to do is to go and see for your self how sophisticated education could be made to be.

1. American International School, Lagos – N5.5 Million

Address: Behind 1004 Federal Estate Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria.
Website: http://www.aislagos.org

The American International School of Lagos (AISL) is a private, coeducational school, which offers an American educational program for students of all nationalities in preschool through 12th grade. The curriculum at AISL is based on US national standards. AISL is fully accredited through the Council of International Schools and the Middle States Association. AISL is an International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) World School. I am glad to inform you that the fees here are paid only in the US Dollars. This is a breakdown of the core annual school fees of this world class school for the 2014/2015 Session:

-Application fee: $586
-Registration fee: $11,715
-Annual capital Levy: $2,662
-6th – 8th (Middle School): $24,101
-9th – 12th (High School): $27,638
-Special Assessment Fee: $9,010
-English Language Learners (ELL): $5,946
-Student Support: $5,946.

 

THE MOST EXPENSIVE SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN NIGERIA WITH MIND BLOWING FEES! (3)

CONTINUED FROM LAST POST

15. Dowen College, Lekki, Lagos – N2 million

Address: 18, Adebayo herty Road, Road 14 , Phase 1, Lekki, Lagos.
Website: http://www.dowencollege.org

This is an independent co-educational boarding and day school in the heart of Regency Town, Lekki, Lagos. It offers a broad and balanced education within a friendly, caring and happy environment. Dowen College is located in Lekki, Lagos and comprises boarding and day houses. In order to make learning worthwhile, the school provides a well equipped library, computer centre, internet connectivity, cultural facilities, football pitch, swimming pool and many more. The fees are about two million naira (N2,000,000) per annum for a boarding student and one million, two hundred and fifty-thousand naira (N1,250,000), for day students. The tuition fees include feeding, school uniform, house wear, and textbooks. I think this is nice, or what do you think?

14. Chrisland College, Ikeja – N2 million

Address: 3 Ladipo Oluwole Avenue, Lagos
Website: http://www.chrislandschools.com

Chrisland High School, Ikeja is a vibrant, modem and unique school concerned with the diversity of learners as people in their totality. It is located at Ladipo Oluwole Avenue, Ikeja, Lagos. Chrisland School is a vibrant modern and unique school.Their facilities include spacious fully air-conditioned classrooms, modern laboratories, music and drama studio, wireless internet access, stocked library, swimming pool, well laid out air-conditioned cafeteria, basketball court and many more. Fees are paid annually or per term but on or before the first day of school. These include registration, tuition deposit, accommodation and feeding. Student pay as high as N2,000,000. With all these, it is expected that learners in the future will be able to compete nationally and internationally with their peers in a very competitive world. May be I’m yet to get to your taste, but I think this will do…

13. Atlantic Hall, Epe, Lagos – N2.27 million

Address: Poka, Epe, Lagos, Nigeria
Website: http://www.atlantic-hall.net

Atlantic Hall is a private coeducational secondary school in Epe which holds about 600 students and located about 70 kilometres from Lagos in Nigeria. The school has chosen to maintain its present population of approximately 600 students from ages 10 to 17; with a staff student ratio of 1 : 10, this is to avail every child the opportunity to be known. At Atlantic Hall, the student is committed to academic excellence and a well-rounded education. The school has a well equipped medical centre, sporting facilities, well equipped laboratories, swimming pool, etc. Weekends in school is filled with a wide range of social activities including concerts, talent shows, dances and film shows. The school charges as much as two million, two hundred and seventy thousand naira (N2,270,000) for a student per annum. And mind you, this is only tuition, there are some other additional fees such as uniforms, books, etc.

12. Corona Secondary School, Agbara – N2.55 million

Address: Yenagoa Road, Agbara Estate, Agbara, Ogun State, Nigeria.
Website http://www.coronaschools.org

Corona Secondary School is a residential, co-educational school with the aim to create well-rounded students who are proudly Nigerian, able to express themselves and their culture in any environment either locally or internationally. The unique curriculum allows all students to study for local (NECO), regional (WAEC) and international (IGCSE) qualifications which equips them not just with the knowledge they will need in the future but also the skills that will allow them to be life-long learners. The focus of the Corona Schools’ Trust Council is the development of world-class schools. World class in all facets of operations – curriculum, teaching methodologies, staff quality, libraries, technology, buildings, resources, facilities, management and so on. The fee in this school is over N2 million!

11. Hillcrest School, Jos – N2.65 million

Address: 13 Old Bukuru Road. P.O.Box 652, Jos, Plateau, Nigeria.
Website: http://www.hillcrestschool.net

Lagos, Abuja and Port Harcourt seem to be taking the greater chunk of these expensive schools, but here we come with one of them located in the Northern part of the country, Jos. Hillcrest School is a private, co-educational day school situated in the city of Jos in Nigeria which is a K-12th grade International Christian School with an American curriculum. A significant number of her students come from Nigeria, but a good number come from other countries. The school is owned and operated by eight missions/church organizations. Annually almost all graduates are admitted into North American universities. That’s why it is no doubt patronized by only the elite and rich.

10. Loyola Jesuit, Abuja – N2.8 million

Address: Karu-Karshi Road, Gidan Mangoro, Abuja.
Website: http://www.loyolajesuit.org

Loyola Jesuit College opened with JS 1 in 1996. It is a full co-educational private boarding school, with teaching and supervision from members of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), and specially trained and dedicated lay teachers. The school is located in Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria, situated on a 28.5-hectare site in the village of Gidan Mangoro. The school provides an atmosphere conducive to focused learning. They charge as much as N2,800,000 per student. Loyola Jesuit College is one of the most sought-after secondary schools in Nigeria. The school is very selective when it comes to admitting new students, making it difficult for many people to school there. For LJC, I’ll say, it’s not only about the cost, but the much cherished quality education is also certain.

9. Meadow Hall, Lagos – N3 million

Address: Elegushi Beach Road, By the 4th Roundabout, Lagos-Epe Express Rd, Lekki.
Website: http://www.meadowhallschool.org

Mrs. Kehinde Nwani founded the Meadow Hall Educational Group in 2002. Meadow Hall Group seeks to provide through its subsidiaries opportunities for the children to develop in all areas thus being able to fully give expression to their unique talents and intelligence and reach their highest potential. Meadow hall School is focused on grooming life-long learners and building a learning organisation conversant with the use of 21st Century methodologies and strategies. But don’t lose focus on the saying that high quality comes with higher price- Meadow Hall fee is as “low” as N3 million.

8. Greensprings School, Lagos – N3.185 million

Address: No. 32, Olatunde Ayoola Avenue, Anthony, Lagos
Website: http://www.greenspringsschool.com

We are gradually getting down to the “bigger heads”! Greensprings School is a member of the International Schools Curriculum Project (ISCP), Association of International Schools in Africa (AISA) and Association for the Advancement of International Education (AAIE). In addition to being recognized locally with the necessary approval and accreditation to run as an educational establishment in Nigeria by the Lagos State Ministry of Education, Greensprings School is accredited by The Commission on International and Trans-Regional Accreditation (CITA), an agency involved in improving standards in schools across the world through the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools in the USA. The fees which is left at a considerable prize of N3 million plus annually for a boarding student and N1,925,200 annually for day student, include a registration which is once, tuition, textbooks, school and house uniforms, PTA levy, caution fee, etc.

TO BE CONTINUED