WHY TEACHING IS STILL THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD

1. The potential to transform lives – ask any teacher who has helped a student in any number of ways, from academic to welfare and emotional learning, and they will tell you that life is not only good, but amazing.

2. It gives you the chance to be continuously creative – of course there are increasing levels of accountability in teaching, but teachers are allowed to be creative in every lesson. Even in observations, in fact most of all in observations, lessons are encouraged to be creative and interesting to engage the students. Teachers have so many opportunities to try new ideas, and indulge in iterative process to ensure the optimum learning environment is created.

3. It offers you a chance to continuously get better – teachers are not only encouraged to seek continuous professional development, but can ask for observation on a regular basis, to provide opportunities to grow and learn from masters or more experienced practitioners. In so few professions is there such support, and considering that as a minimum, contracts are for a year, teachers have so much time to demonstrate improvement. A growth mindset is part of the foundation of teaching.

4. It is a grounding, humbling profession – the amount of work teachers do compared to remuneration is shockingly disproportionate, in 2 senses: firstly, in terms of how many paid vs non paid hours of work they receive, and secondly, in relation to other similarly creative and important (and not so important) vocations in our society. But that is not why teachers teach. So few teachers go into the vocation for the salary – it’s a calling before anything else.

5. There is always satisfaction somewhere – teaching is a calling, and no one enters it without his or her inner voice telling him or her that. Of course there are always some imposters, but the massive majority have their hearts in the right place. How cool is that for the students?

Having said that, teaching can be and is incredibly demanding, and often we can lose sight of that calling, bogged down in aspects of the profession that don’t seem to be connected to it. But on closer inspection, most of the extra demands are actually central to the job itself: explaining to parents where you are coming from; being observed; collaborating with others; marking.

Take this last aspect, crucial to understanding whether students are learning what you believe you are teaching. Yes, it is very time consuming, but perhaps one of the most important and fundamental weapons in a teacher’s arsenal; any good school will understand this and the other cited demands, and create an environment where they become part of directed time.

It is when these aspects are not acknowledged in directed time that the conditions for burnout are rife.

6. It’s a chance to truly to lead the world in the 21st century – introducing students to new technologies and ways of presenting, curating, and collaborating with others with what they know is truly exciting and truly invigorating. Modern teachers are actually pioneering pedagogy, and can and will be able to hold their heads up high in the future when we look back and see how learning in this day and age took a radical but enormously beneficial turn for the better.

Engaging students in greater collaboration, and instilling initiative in curation and the promotion of information leads to truly independent learning, and setting up such learning environments is an opportunity that all teachers now have before them. There are few more gratifying feelings that being needed.

7. The children.

By Paul Moss

Source: Why Teaching Is The Best Job In The World

THINGS STUDENTS LOVE TO HEAR TEACHERS SAY

THINGS STUDENTS LOVE TO HEAR TEACHERS SAY

5 Things Students Love to Hear Teachers Say

1. “You’ve shown great improvement”
2. “I’m proud of you”
3. “You were one of my best students”-
4. “You have the ability and the potential”
5. “You can do it!”

Nancy Barile

3 Things Students Desire to Hear From Teachers

“Every child needs at least one adult who is irrationally crazy about him or her.” – Urie Bronfenbrenner

1.”I believe in you.You are going to be successful someday”
2.“You have a purpose.I see it and feel it!”
3.”Question Me.Ask me how I am. Ask me what I need. Ask me my thoughts and feelings.”

Dr. Lori Desautels
Assistant Professor in the School of Education Marian University

EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE: WHAT’S YOUR VIEW?

Cheating involves real, intended, or attempted deception and/or dishonest action in relation to any academic work in an institution. It can also be called academic dishonesty.Examination malpractices have consistently remained a bane of Nigerian educational system. Most foreigners say that the academic certificates being issued to graduates in Nigeria are no more valuable than the pieces of paper on which they are printed.

So what is examination malpractice? Examination malpractice is an illegal behavior by a candidate before, during or after the examination so that he/she can attain success easily and cheaply. Hence, the worth of the examination is violated.

The major causes of examination malpractices are:

i. Laziness of students: Seriousness is thrown to the wind by many students. Most of them have little time for their studies. They spend their time attending parties and forming gangs who engage in untoward behaviour.

ii. Second is large population of students in many schools. The few who do very well may be promoted or admitted into higher institutions. Students cheat therefore to excel over their mates.

iii. Many students are desperate; thinking that passing the examination is a do or die affair; They want to excel by all means. Some want promises from parents fulfilled Others want to be on TV or Newspaper as the best in one form of examination or the other (though cheats hardly excel).

iv. Syllabuses in many subjects such as Physics, Chemistry etc. are wide and difficult for teachers to cover. The school period is shortened by holidays, shift system and late resumption by students.

v. Another cause of examination malpractice is inadequate preparation for exams. In a number of schools the teachers are few and specialized ones are fewer so students are not adequately prepared for the examinations.
vi. Corrupt invigilators and supervisors: the students know that if they offer bribe to the invigilators. they will be allowed to cheat in the examination hall.

vii. Lastly, there is a general trend in our society towards cheating and this is encouraged by almost all members of the society.The evil effects of examination malpractices cannot be overemphasize. Creativity and resourcefulness are hampered. It wreaks great havoc on the social, religious, economic and political lives of Nigerians.

Some Possible Solutions to Examination Malpractices are:

i. Teachers should he trained properly in their fields.

ii. Holidays may be more in number but reduced in length as students are reluctant to resume from long holidays.

iii. Guidance Counselors should be employed in all schools to guide the students on study habits, career prospects and needs for various careers.

iv. Continuous assessment should be practiced correctly. It will cut examination malpractices as 40% of marks are accumulated from various assessment techniques such as projects and assignments before actual examinations.

v. The number of invigilators and supervisors should be increased in the exam halls. Exam officers, Vice Principals and Principals should occasionally pay visits to exam halls to see what is going on.

vi. The students should be thoroughly searched before entering the hall. Apart from photographs, finger prints on certificates should he used for identification.

In conclusion, solutions are only possible where there are Examination Halls, large classrooms, adequate seats and adequate number of teachers in a school. The government can play a very big role in curbing this menace by providing enough classrooms, desks and employing qualified teachers. And also, during an examination, the school should make sure that each student gets his/her own question paper and provide enough invigilators. The Federal government has established an Exam Ethics Committee, all State Government and Local Government Councils should do the same thing.

https://losici.wordpress.com/2013/09/27/examination-malpractice-whats-your-view/

HERE’S WHY EAST ASIAN STUDENTS CONSISTENTLY OUTPACE THEIR WESTERN PEERS

The results speak for themselves. The latest Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) have been released – and, once again, East Asian countries have ranked the highest in both tests.

Over recent years, other countries’ positions have gone up and down in the tables but East Asian education – which includes China, Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan – continues to dominate.

And the gap between these countries and the rest of the world is getting wider.

The reasons why East Asian countries are way ahead of the pack as far as education is concerned has long been debated – but it essentially seems to come down to the following four factors.

1. Culture and mindset

There is a high value placed on education and a belief that effort rather than innate ability is the key to success. East Asian researchers usually point to this as the most important factor for this regions high test results.

The positive aspect of this approach to education is that there is an expectation that the vast majority of pupils will succeed. Learners are not labelled and put into “ability” groups – as they are in England, where this is the norm even in many primary schools. So, in East Asian countries, everyone has the same access to the curriculum – which means many more pupils are able to get those high grades.

Formal schooling is also supplemented by intensive after-school tuition – at the extreme this can see children studying well into the night – and sometimes for up to three hours of extra school in the evening on top of two hours of homework a day.

But while this intensive after school study can get results, it’s important to recognise that in many East Asian countries, educators worry about the quality and influence these “crammers” have on the mental health and well-being of children. And many studies looking at pupils’ experiences in these schools have reported high levels of adolescent stress and a sense of pressure to achieve – for both the students and their parents.

2. The quality of teachers

Teaching is a respected profession in East Asia, where there is stiff competition for jobs, good conditions of service, longer training periods and support for continuing and extensive professional development.

In Shanghai, teachers have much lower teaching workloads than in England – despite the bigger classes. And they use specialist primary mathematics teachers, who teach two 35-40 minute lessons a day. This gives the teachers time for planning – or the chance to give extra support to pupils that need it – along with time for professional development in teacher research groups.

In Japan, “lesson study” is embedded in primary schools. This involves teachers planning carefully designed lessons, observing each other’s teaching, and then drawing out the learning points from these observations. And lesson study also gives teachers time to research and professionally develop together.

3. Using the evidence

Ironic though it may be, much of the theoretical basis for East Asian education has been heavily influenced by research and developments in the West. For example, Jerome Bruner’s theory of stages of representation which says that learners need hands-on experiences of a concept – then visual representations – as a basis for learning symbolic or linguistic formulations.

This has been translated in Singapore as a focus on concrete, pictorial and abstract models in mathematical learning. For example, this might mean arranging counters in rows of five to learn the five times table, then using pictures of hands that each have five digits, before writing multiplication facts in words, and then adding in numerals and the multiplication and equals signs.

4. A collective push

In the 1970s, Singapore’s educational outcomes lagged behind the rest of the world – the transformation of Singaporean education was achieved through systemic change at national level that encompassed curriculum development, national textbooks and pre-service and in-service teacher education.

Similarly in Shanghai and South Korea educational change and improvement is planned and directed at a national level. This means that all schools use government approved curriculum materials, there is more consistency about entry qualifications to become a teacher and there is much less diversity of types of schools than in the UK.

The success of East Asian education has turned these countries into “reference societies” – ones by which policymakers in the UK and elsewhere measure their own education systems and seek to emulate. Interest in East Asian education in the UK has informed the current “mastery approach” which is used in primary mathematics. Teaching for mastery uses methods found in Shanghai and Singapore and has been the basis of many recent research projects – some sponsored by government funding and others promoted by educational charities or commercial organisations.
http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-east-asian-students-consistently-outpace-their-western-peers-2016-12

EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES AMONGST NIGERIAN YOUTH BY OSIM PAULINUS JOHN

Examination is a right way of deciding one’s mastery of a particular subject or many subjects. It is also a way safely determining one’s ability to be promoted to a new class, new job or place. Examination Malpractice is a deviation from the normal procedure. It is an illegal and dishonest way of passing an examination. Examination malpractice is in itself an aspect of cheating, it is academic dishonesty.

Like in our country Nigeria, today students no longer study their books to pass their exams, because of the miracles happening in the various examination halls. It has eaten so deep into the nerve center of our educational well being that there is hardly any area of examination that people do not cheat in today. The practice has gripped into the primary, secondary, teacher training colleges, colleges of educations, technical colleges and even the universities.

This examination malpractice is one of the problems, that is killing our educational system today.
The value of education system lies in its ability to actualize the goals of education. Till now, exams still remain the important tool for an objective assessment and evaluation of what learners have achieved after a period of schooling.

Examination malpractice is now common everywhere and you can see that every examination seasons witnesses the emergence of new and ingenious ways of cheating.

THE CAUSE OF EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE

Firstly, the parents; moral upbringing of some of the youths is definitely poor. The ransom paid to the mercenaries who write the exams for our students is paid by the parents.Many parents go to the extent of bribing their way through to make sure unearned grades for their words. Like during the time of exams (E.g., WAEC, NECO etc.) it is not the parents that give their children (students) the money to move from their parent school to a new school in search of miracles during the exams. Many parents are the corrupt master and mistresses of education in our country (Nigeria). They are therefore, the causes of examination malpractice among the students today.

Secondly, the teachers; they act like parents to the children while they are in schools, but are they out to teach the students in an active interactive and creative academic foundations? Are they out to produce students who are relevant, efficient, production, competitive and excel in every endeavors in life positively.So i don’t know what the students will do if the teachers abandon their responsibilities in the academic field, if the teachers also, fail to implement the school curriculum as required, what will the students do and not engaging themselves in examination malpractices to pass their examination? Many teachers encourage examination malpractice because they lack the zeal to work but want to be praised for the job not done.

Thirdly, lazy attitude of students; students today are totally lazy towards their studies some are not ready to do any serious academic work. Instead, they would resort to cheating during examinations to pass. Some see examination malpractice as an opportunity to make quick money. Examination papers are produced and sold to candidates some of these papers have been discovered to be fake while, sometimes they have been genuine.

Fourthly, the Global System of Mobile Telephones (GSM); which in our world today has totally revolutionized examination malpractice in the school system. A lot of academic information is stored in handset for directs use in examination halls or for  transfer Via SMS to other student anywhere in the country.

CONSEQUENCES

Examination malpractice leads to irreversible loss of credibility. A country that becomes noted for examination malpractices loses international credibility. The implication is that certificates, documents emanating from the country will be treated with suspicion.

Furthermore, the producing of fake drugs by pharmacists and massive fraud in commercial banks are the consequences of examination malpractice not controlled at the earlier stage which blossomed to high scale malpractice and corruption.
Finally, I urge you my fellow youths to desist from any form of examination malpractices no mater who is urging you to be involved. We should try and work hard enough to develop self confidence in ourselves, because what we sow, we reap, whether good or bad.

OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET FOR STUDIES

Educational Resources

 You can find a lot of fine educational materials available on the internet, however It sometimes takes a while to locate it. These links will lead you to important topics covered in many subjects and training resources which we might be very beneficial to you.

 Open educational resources (OER) are freely accessible, openly licensed documents and media that are useful for teaching, learning, and assessing as well as for research purposes. It is the leading trend in distance education/open and distance learning domain as a consequence of the openness movement.

There is no universal usage of open file formats in OER.The development and promotion of open educational resources is often motivated by a desire to provide an alternate or enhanced educational paradigm.

  1. Algebra Explorations, Pre-K through Grade 7
  2. Basic Algebra
  3. Basic Algebra Concepts
  4. Algebra 1
  5. Algebra I Teacher’s Edition
  6. Algebra 2
  7. Basic Geometry
  8. Basic Geometry, Teacher’s Edition
  9. Basic Geometry Concepts
  10. Geometry
  11. Geometry, Teacher’s Edition
  12. CK-12 Trigonometry Concepts
  13. Trigonometry
  14. Trigonometry, Teacher’s Edition
  15. Basic Probability and Statistics – A Short Course
  16. Basic Probability and Statistics – A Full Course
  17. CK-12 Basic Probability and Statistics Concepts – A Full Course
  18. CK-12 Advanced Probability and Statistics Concepts
  19. Probability and Statistics (Advanced Placement)
  20. Advanced Probability and Statistics Teacher’s Edition
  21. Calculus
  22. Calculus, Teacher’s Edition
  23. Basic Physics
  24. CK-12 People’s Physics Concepts
  25. Physics – From Stargazers to Starships
  26. 21st Century Physics
  27. Chemistry
  28. Chemistry, Teacher’s Edition
  29. Chemistry – Labs & Demos
  30. Biology
  31. Biology Workbook
  32. Biology, Teacher’s Edition
  33. Life Science for Middle School
  34. Earth Science Concepts
  35. Earth Science for Middle Schools
  36. Earth Science for High Schools
  37. Engineering – An Introduction for High School
  38. Adventure Stories
  39. Africa
  40. Anthropology
  41. Archaeology
  42. Best Books Ever Bookshelf
  43. Biographies
  44. Children’s Book Series
  45. Children’s Fiction
  46. Children’s Literature
  47. Classical Era Collection
  48. Detective Fiction
  49. Fantasy Collection
  50. Folklore
  51. Gothic Fiction
  52. Harvard Classics Collection
  53. History For Children
  54. Horror Fiction
  55. Mystery Fiction
  56. Native America
  57. One Act Plays
  58. Philosophy
  59. Poetry
  60. School Stories
  61. Science Fiction
  62. Short Stories
  63. Libros en Español
  64. Westerns

 

Encyclopedia – Wikipedia Selection

  1. Art
  2. Business Studies
  3. Citizenship
  4. Countries
  5. Everyday life
  6. Design and Technology
  7. Geography
  8. History
  9. IT
  10. Language and Literature
  11. Mathematics
  12. Music
  13. People
  14. Portals
  15. Religion
  16. Science

 

U.S.National Library of Medicine

  1. Medical Encyclopedia (S.National Library of Medicine)

 

Hesperian Health Guides: (Hesperian)

  1. Where There Is No Doctor. A village health care handbook.
  2. Where There Is No Dentist
  3. Where Women Have No Doctor
  4. Disabled Village Children
  5. Women with Disabilities – A Health Handbook
  6. A Book for Midwives: Care for pregnancy and birth
  7. Helping Children Who Are Deaf
  8. Helping Children Who Are Blind
  9. Cholera Prevention Fact Sheet
  10. Sanitation and Cleanliness for a Healthy Environment
  11. Water for Life – Community water security
  12. A Community Guide to Environmental Health
  13. Helping Health Workers Learn

 

OLPC Educational Packages

  1. Storybooks
  2. Web Design
  3. Wikibooks
  4. Wikislice General
  5. Wikislice Animals

100.WikiHow

101.Biology

102.Wikislice Chemistry

103.Wikislice Physics

104.Nature Photographs

105.World Culture

106.Music Samples

107.How to Build Musical Instruments

108.y-Bee-See – An interactive ABC picturebook

109.A compact multilingual translation dictionary

110.Primary Mathematics in English

111.Primary Science in English

112.Secondary Science in English

113.School Management in English

114.HIV/AIDS Electronic Library – resource for teachers

Mathematics / Typing / Music lessons

115.MathExpression Math Video Lessons, Tips and Practice, from Wei  Chong

116.Typing Practice

117.Music Theory Lessons, from musictheory.net

A CHECKLIST FOR TEACHING SCIENCE SUBJECTS EFFECTIVELY IN NIGERIAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

MASON COLLEGE SCIENCE TEACHER SUBMITS SEMINAR REPORT ON “EFFECTIVE METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE” A LECTURE GIVEN BY MR.ATOKARA DANIEL (A GUEST SPEAKER FROM GHANA)

INTRODUCTION

He defined effective method as the art of teaching science such that students will be able to get the content of the teaching, and the teaching will in turn reflect on students’ behavior.He defined science as a way of explaining the universe in which we live in. He also stated that science is a body of knowledge and a process of acquiring knowledge.

The fundamental knowledge in scientific principles by “Marvin Druger” were given as;
(1)Science might be taught in an integrative manner.
(2)Changes in the science teacher preparation. That is the teacher should adopt different teaching formats, this will serve as a challenge to the students.
(3)Focus on students’ motivation.
(4)An active student involvement in the learning. In this case the teacher is expected to carry the students along as he teaches.

He then highlighted the various methodologies of teaching science effectively coupled with relevant check lists. He explained that the importance of the checklist is to guide the teacher on his presentations.

METHOLOGY OF TEACHING SCIENCE EFFECTIVELY:

a.The Use Of Chalkboard:

-This is to illustrate, outline or underscore ideas in written or graphic forms.In using the chalkboard facts that cannot be picked by students during the teacher’s explanation might be seen more clearly by students

-Relevant checklist applicable to the Chalkboard were given as follows…The teacher must;

-Say what he/she has to say before writing them on the board.
-Use keywords or concepts.
-Be aware of the organization of ideas on the board.
-Erase the board before writing a new concept, idea or diagram.
-Write legibly and large enough to be easily read.

b.Demonstration

-He said this can be used to teach concepts or skills directly or to prepare students for laboratory work, he further explained that this will also provide the students opportunity to see a phenomenon or event that they otherwise would not have observed.
-The following checklists were also given on demonstration.He said that the teacher must;

-Be sure that the students can see and hear clearly.
-Do the demonstration on his own before trying it in front of students.
-Take all necessary precautionary/safety measures,for example making sure all windows are opened.
-Plan his demonstration so that it clearly shows the intended concepts or skills.

c.Field Trip

-The speaker described a field trip as a unique learning experience that cannot be accomplished in classrooms.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Take the trip first before going with the students.
-Prepare the students for the trip by determining their objectives and general expectations.
-Make proper transportation arrangements.
-Confirm prior arrangements for admission.
-Obtain permission slips from parents or guardians
-Arrange for additional adult colleagues of opposite gender to come along.

d.Laboratory

-He said that the laboratory gives the students unique experiences on the actual use of equipment and materials as they resolve problems and develop knowledge,skills and values related to effective science teaching and learning.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Select a laboratory that best illustrates his objectives.
-Make necessary changes in the physical arrangement of the laboratory.
-Be sure that materials needed for the practicals are available and functional.
-Give clear, succinct directions including safety precautions,how to handle equipments, where to obtain materials, assignment of groups and also expectations of conduct and reporting.

e.Laboratory Report

-He stated that this will formalize the students’ laboratory experience and make connections between prior and present knowledge.

-Checklist include…The teacher must;

-Involve students in report writing.
-Outline expectation in terms of length, format and thoroughness.
-Review the students report.

f.Film Shows/Classroom Computer & 1CT Devices (Devices)

-He said these will present information in an interesting and efficient manner.

-Checklist: The teacher must;

-Preview the Devices before showing/using them to/in the class
-Decide where the Devices can best fit in the instructional sequence
-Outline some introductory remarks.
-Ensure that the students concentrate on knowing how devices work and in knowning why they are relevant.
-At times pause Devices and have brief discussions where necessary, but not to be done too repeatedly.
-Conduct a discussion after the Devices come to an end.
-Entertain questions from students and make connections between content in Devices and the students’ previous knowledge and relevance for future topics.

g.Lecture

-This is used to present a large body of information.

-Checklist: In doing the teachers is expected to;

-Be sure that the lecture is organized, use an outline and make it available before or during the lecture.
-Supplement lectures with slides and/or charts to illustrate concepts and ideas.
-Monitor students’ attention and relate previous knowledge with the present one to widen students understanding.
-Talk clearly and in a manner that clarifies key points and facilitate note taking.

h.Questioning:

-This stimulates thinking more effectively by a 2-way communcation between the teacher and students

-Checklist: The teacher must;

-Use variety of questions to test if the students have actually gained from the teaching.
-Outline expectation in terms of length, format and thoroughness.
-Provide time for the students to think about answers or questions
-Use questions that require thinking at different levels for instance recall, comprehension, application, analysis and evaluation.

Good luck.

10 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT EDUCATION IN NIGERIA

1.That government is doing something about revival of a reading culture

2.That just having libraries in schools will improve educational standards without a deliberate program of use.

3.That the internet has created a phobia for reading by students.Big lie they now read more through their phones even if what they read is Facebook and Twitter.

4.That importation of foreign educational systems by Nigerian governments is bad

5.That there is a real class of “stakeholders” in Education in Nigeria

6.That teachers were good because they were better trained.

7That educational standards of today’s graduates is nothing to write home about.

8.That educating children is an investment for parents’ rainy days

9.That students were more serious in the past than today.

10.Many feel the goals/objectives of teaching are still the same as those of many years ago.

PLEASE ASK US FOR MORE NOTES ON ANY OF THESE IF YOU WISH.THANK YOU.

NIGERIA NEEDS EDUCATION REFORMS…BY OLUWAGBENGA OYEBANJI

NIGERIA NEEDS EDUCATION REFORMS...BY OLUWAGBENGA OYEBANJI

I have always believed education should be driven towards self discovery. I read two books that changed my mind set about education, ‘Innovation and Entrepreneurship’ by Peter Drucker and ‘Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee. The two books opened my eyes to where the 21st century education is threading. The first speaks about entrepreneurship as a practice, the second dwells on the future of the world’s economy. The two books influenced the idea and thought of this writing. When I first came across the name Wilhelm Von Humboldt in Peter Drucker’s book , I was awed by contribution of this man, his philosophy about education and human development. It was Wilhelm Von Humboldt after the Napoleon war who conceptualized the “3 natural stages of education” which consist of elementary schooling, secondary school and tertiary education.

Wilhelm Von Humboldt, a German contributed greatly to cognitive growth of western education. He proposed the university concept of study and research, extensively advocated apprenticeship model of student and professorial concept. This concept of study and research helped produce the greatest physicist and scientist of 19th and 20th century, which includes Albert Einstein, Max Born, Max Planck and many that can’t be mentioned. The freedom of science and research and the autonomy of teaching staffs are his model’s foundation. The Americans got this concept and developed on it. The second book the ‘Second Machine Age’ distorted my cogitation. It got me seeing the global economy from expertise point of view, it made me reflect about my country Nigeria, it got me realizing and understanding that the western economies’ success is not coincidental.

Nigeria’s education was inherited from the British. The first secondary school in Nigeria was founded in 1859 by Church Missionary Society, while the first primary school was founded in Badagry in 1845 called St. Thomas Anglican Primary School. The tertiary system of education was first introduced in 1948 called University of Ibadan. This is the journey of Nigeria’s education which is purely based on literacy and not expertise. Education is the bedrock of civilization and industrialization. Without it man would become extinct. Because education has given man the opportunity to be fruitful, to multiply, replenish, subdue and dominate the earth. The root word of education is from a latin word called “educo” which means to develop within or to train the mind. If Nigeria wants to be a first world country, education is the only vehicle that can help actualize this lofty dream.

Today, education in Nigeria is literacy driven. The problem started with the introduction of the 6-5-1-4 system that later became 6-3-3-4. The latter model compounded the education industry by focusing strictly on certifications. The military regime crippled the education model in Nigeria by introducing 6-3-3-4 without considering its socio-economic impact on the society. I decided to analyze the problem of 6-3-3-4 in Nigeria, did lots of research about education and I was surprised.

Most elementary schools in Lagos talk about Montessori system for primary school. It is disheartening to know that 99% don’t understand what they are talking about. Montessori elementary school system primarily focuses on sensory training, language learning, acquiring motor skills and social adaptation learning. Montessori, because of her background as a pediatrician, her first school was more of a laboratory which later became a school. Her specifics was practical life, sensory training and language development.

The ranking of the 20 best nation’s education system in the world made me sad. Japan and South Korea came first and second, Singapore was fourth. What really got me sad was South Korea and Singapore. Singapore got her independence from Malaysia August 1965 which was 5 years after Nigeria’s independence. Today Singaporean economy is regarded as part of the Asian Tiger. Nigeria’s education is in shambles. The Ministry of Education in Singapore has a policy of helping students develop their talents and grow their potentials to the peak. The policy on education is broad-based while in Nigeria the ministry of education doesn’t have a national policy based on research and policy framework. Most times the ministers of education are appointed on the basis of personalities and status.

The states are not different because most schools are founded based on survival instincts. The Singaporean primary education is focused on language, Math and English but in Nigeria children take many courses which makes them sometimes to be confused. The overall aim of primary education is to give children a convenient grasp of English, Math and language skill. Also the way Singaporean secondary education is structured makes it viable for the children and cost effective for the parents. Students can choose between Normal Academic (NA) or Normal Technical (NT). Everybody has a right to GCE exam after 4-5years. Also, children can switch based on the assessment of their principal and teachers which makes it very practical because assessment is the yardstick for success but in Nigeria examination and grades are the yardstick.

These two stages of education are the foundation of a child’s future. If it’s not gotten right then the university education will be a struggle for the child. America has the best university education because it is based on expertise. According to Stuart Dreyfus’s concept on skill acquisition, his focus is on expertise and organic growth. He divided skill acquisition stage into five: novice, advance beginner, competence, proficiency and expertise. University education should be about building and transforming students to experts in all fields, be it art, science and social science and linguistics. It is the responsibility of politicians and policy makers to create a conducive policy that helps the destiny of these children. It is sad and disheartening that ministerial appointments are compensation for political loyalists. We can have two models in one by adopting the Singaporean model for primary and secondary school and America’s model for university.

It is not by luck that Mark Zuckerberg became an entrepreneur by dropping out from Harvard, it is the environment that allowed that. Many start-ups in USA are leading the pack in Silicon Valley because the system of education is based on expertise. Nigerian graduates are referred to as half-baked not because they are not good but because of systemic deficit from the government. Nigerian university education is based on literacy and not expertise. It is dumb and stupid to send a child to university to learn to read and write. Literacy should be for primary and secondary education. University should be a skill acquisition environment not a literacy center. Because of the grave danger our system of education is facing,, the federal government needs to convene a National Education Conference that should have in attendance, all stakeholders, academia, labour, private sector, religious bodies, artisans, politicians and policy intellectuals.

It is at this conference that a new education policy should be charted for Nigeria. Our peculiarity should be our strength and not weakness. I read an article on CNN’s website about a Nigerian girl in Britain that got admitted into university at the age of 10, and I was not surprised because Britain’s education is ranked among the best 10 in the world. Someone could still argue that the circumstance of her success is her parents and not the system, but it happened in Britain because of the conducive environment. Nigeria’s politicians and policy makers should know that we have a common destiny. Quality education that is based on expertise is still the best way to reduce poverty, to promote prosperity and gain respect in the comity of nations.

A report of the youngest billionaires in the world by Forbes is a testament that expertise is the new way of making wealth in the 21st century. All these young people were under 40, they are rich and influential. The majority of these young people had a good system of education from elementary to university. They developed their expertise based on exposure to sound and quality education. More young people will be rich and influential in this 21st century. The question is, how many such experts will Nigeria produce? These are the questions that should be on the lips of our politicians. How do we create a country that majorly produces experts? Back to the two books I read, it is a fact that most entrepreneurs are experts in their fields of endeavor. That is why it is easy to attract investors to whatever they venture into. Also, it is the truth that in the 21st century, machine can never take the job of experts but it will take the jobs of literates. The Nigerian government at all levels have to start creating platforms through the education system that produces experts that can contribute to the country and world at large. Facebook was created at Harvard. Today it is contributing not only to America’s economy but world economy. The future is great if our politicians and policy makers give priority to the economy using education as the tool to achieve economic prosperity.

Education should be seen as the path to economic freedom. The change APC is clamoring for is possible with education. We need to see education more than literacy, it is a viable tool to develop all sectors of our economy. What we are championing as education is literacy, it does not give the right awareness to solution of problems..Education is solution-based, it makes an expert. Experts are the new superstars of the corporate world, they are the real educated beings. Education that is solution-based is the way to alleviate poverty in Nigeria, while education that is certificate-based is literacy. The education reforms should focus on seeing education from expertise point of view. If quality education is the focus, economic development and growth will be fast in Nigeria. “The labour of our heroes past shall never be in vain.” God bless Nigeria.

—Oyebanji is Entrepreneurship consultant/editor-in-chief of SuccessPoint Magazine. E-mail: siemmag@gmail.com; Tel:07035458475; Twitter: @oluwagbenga6.

 

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (10)

 

CONTINUED FROM LAST POST

91. Teachers must help low achievers break the cycle of failure. Low performing students need the opportunity to revalue themselves. They need expressions with relevant methods. They need to conquer strategies that will result in understanding. Teachers need to recognize reluctant, remedial, strategic students. They must distinguish between students who cannot study and those who will never study though they can. Many students without obvious physical problems are actually disabled students because they can neither read nor add sums on their own properly.

92. A very strong library to offer a wide range of reading materials is essential. Set up young readers clubs backed up by books they can read. Please read the following:

a.https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/07/25/the-school-librarya-wake-up-call-to-nigerian-parents/

b. https://mile2herald.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/inside-our-national-library-of-outdated-books/

93. Encourage students to read topics in advance and to contribute in class during daily lesson.

94. The earlier suggestion that students should stay longer in their classrooms with less brain-tasking but interesting programmes later in the day when their capacity to concentrate or assimilate might have been reduced is important. No matter what their situation is they will be better off staying a bit longer in classrooms than going home at 2pm as day students or their dormitories as boarding students. The proposal here is that the hours being spent at school by each student public or private be extended to 5pm daily. The added time need be spent to take care of the following:

Home work / Assignments
-Remedial studies in Maths and English and individual subject areas.

95. Saturdays also need be converted into a regular school day between 10 am and 3 pm. The day can be used for remedial studies and other academic – related activities. Muslims who might want their children out for afternoon Quoran lesson should be allowed because it is an academic – related activity too.

96. Goals and objectives of remedial studies need be identified. Use a Time Table and schemes of work. Measure achievement. Exclude students under remedial programs from regular continuous assessment. Let periodical measurements stand in instead. For such an arrangement to be useful objectives and expected goals must be realistic and related to new broad objectives for education.

97.For coordination of Remedial Studies there will be need to recruit extra hands especially of retired Education officers who are still physically fit. However, what matters most is quality time spent by students and teachers together after regular school hours. Remedial work must aim at improving on that.

98.As a matter of fact it has been discovered scientifically that there is some relationship between achievement and quality time spent together. Extended time initiatives have produced gains. The key seems to be longer time spent on study techniques and habits. It has therefore been proposed that tutors need have more training on remedial and mentoring techniques

99.Establish/Strengthen truly functional Education Support Services departments WHERE THEY EXIST all over the Federation. More notes will come up on this later.

100.There should be a Corp of EDUCATION ROAD MARSHALS to be on roads close to schools to help reduce lateness to school and to improve neatness especially of students from public schools whose uniforms sometimes look as if sewn by aliens.There should also be a set up of 3 strikes which can lead to suspension or invitation of one’s parents.

101.You had better believed most of the things itemized under this write-up. Only someone who has worked for long and deeply within our educational system can make some of the proposals we have put forward.

We shall be adding another set of related-proposals soon

Thank you

KAYODE ODUMOSU (AUGUST 2015)

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (9)

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (9)

 

Continued from here…101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (8)

81.Schools and tutors need to take record keeping seriously.

82.Different approaches and teaching techniques will be essential for some students. Best method for classroom control than caning.

83.More admin staff required in most public and private schools.

84.Schools should have maintenance managers like in LGAs and LCDAs. Their job descriptions will cover taking care of maintenance and security of hard ware in each school. At least one person should be engaged to landscape government schools and make them look more attractive
85.All teachers need classroom strategic training for 3 – 6 months. For every graduate teacher this should be regarded as training for professionalization.

86.Many teachers and school administrators have been observed to exhibit many weaknesses which definitely need some attention. For these, teachers and management ought to attend relevant seminars and conferences. Relevant weaknesses can be found here:
a) https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/40-staff-weaknesses-common-in-nigerian-secondary-schoolspublic-and-private/

b) https://lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com/2012/11/18/25-ways-school-managersstaff-expose-their-weaknesses-i

87.Tutors need to know how to provide substitute or self – made teaching aids where those expected are not available.

88.Why do we allow British / American / Turkish and other curricula to run pari passu with those of WAEC / NECO/ JSCE?

89. Since lesson notes are usually submitted after lessons many so-called HODs are not even qualified to conduct corrective supervision before been used for students. This atmosphere on non-professionalism and non – training lead to bad preparations of lesson notes.

90. Generally speaking many school examinations are faulty. A direct consequence of this is that continuous assessment and test scores are unrealistic and parents reading them are being misled.

TO BE CONTINUED NEXT POST

POLICY SOMERSAULTS IN OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PAST 40 YEARS IS LIKE A COMICAL TV SERIES!

 

POLICY SOMERSAULTS IN OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PAST 40 YEARS IS LIKE A COMICAL TV SERIES!

The nation’s educational system had gone through many changes. In the late 70s and 80s, it was the 6-5-4 system that was in place. This system represented six years in the primary school, five years in the secondary school and four years in the tertiary institution.

Again, a shift in policy later came up, and it gave birth to Higher School Certificate, popularly known as HSC, which gave another two-year stop gap of learning to pupils after secondary school, before they proceeded to the university.

Later, several shifts in policy thrusts on education had emerged. Nigeria has had 6-3-3-4, and 9-3-4 systems of education.

The 6-3-3-4 indicated six years in the primary school, three years each in junior and senior secondary schools ; and four years in the higher institution.

The 6-3-3-4 was modified in 2009, which led to the present 9-3-4 system of education. This was done with the view to including the components of basic, technical and vocational inputs into the curriculum, as pupils were expected to complete the first nine years before proceeding on a career path in the next three years of secondary education.

These changes, as far as government is concerned, are all for giving Nigerian pupils and students qualitative and pragmatic education. But whether that has been achieved or not is a story for another day.

The nation’s education policy of 9-3-4 has since been replaced by another one to a 1-6-3-3-4 education structure.

But Nigerians have blamed the stunted growth in the education sector on inconsistent policies of Government in the country.They have also taken to the social media to make their contributions on the new education policy.

A visit to the nairaland.com, one KX querries, “Is the 1-6- 3- 3- 4 going to turn the flooded classrooms to model classrooms? Is it going to provide textbooks and reading materials to the pupils and students? Is it going to pay the N18,000 minimum wage to the teachers? Is the revised 6-3-3-4 system what the educational sector needs more than the enabling environment for teaching and learning?”

BECOMING A STRATEGIC TEACHER: BETTER INSTRUCTION, DEEPER LEARNING, HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT

BECOMING A STRATEGIC TEACHER: BETTER INSTRUCTION, DEEPER LEARNING, HIGHER ACHIEVEMENT

One of the greatest challenges facing today’s school leaders is the challenge of raising the expertise of their teachers. We hear more calls for teacher effectiveness than ever before, and we are seeing that teacher effectiveness is becoming a significant part of the national discussion on education.

Everybody agrees that what teachers do in the classroom matters deeply. A recent investigation into the practices of the world’s top 25 school systems put it this way: “The quality of an education system cannot exceed the quality of its teachers” (Barber & Mourshed, 2007). In fact, a wide body of research shows that the single greatest factor affecting student achievement is classroom instruction. In one study, Mortimore & Sammons (1987) found that classroom instruction has more impact on student learning than any other factor—more important than the next six factors they studied combined. As McKinsey & Company concluded in their study of the world’s best schools, “The only way to improve outcomes is to improve instruction.”

Obviously, we all wish for our teachers to be more thoughtful and effective in designing and delivering instruction that raises student achievement. In The Thoughtful Classroom, we call these teachers strategic teachers, and for three reasons:

1. Strategic teachers have a repertoire of research-based instructional strategies at their disposal.

2. Strategic teachers understand how and when to use particular strategies in their classrooms. They can select strategies that support their objectives and adapt strategies to meet particular learning goals. In other words, their overall approach to instruction is strategic.

3. Strategic teachers understand that their fellow educators are their greatest resource. That’s why strategic teachers seek out opportunities to work and learn with colleagues. It’s also why strategic school leaders seek to develop a school culture that supports teachers as they work together to master new strategies and refine their practice. More than ever, administrators are being asked to play a larger role in building teachers’ expertise because high-performing schools lead to the development of more strategic teachers.

Let’s take a closer look at each of these reasons behind strategic teaching as separate elements.

Element One: Research-Based Instructional Strategies

In the book The Strategic Teacher (Silver, Strong, & Perini, 2007), we’ve collected 20 of the most reliable and flexible research-based strategies and organized them into four distinct styles of instruction: a Mastery style that emphasizes the development of student memory; an Understanding style that seeks to expand students’ capacities to reason and explain; a Self-Expressive style that stimulates and nourishes students’ imaginations and creativity; and an Interpersonal style that helps students find meaning in the relationships they forge as partners and team members, united in the act of learning.

Why such a premium on strategies? Because teachers need strategies if they are going to become experts. When strategies are used well, they work—plain and simple. The strategies in The Strategic Teacher, for example, are all based on solid research and over 35 years of classroom practice. But beyond that, strategies are the answer to so many questions and pressures that today’s teachers face questions like:
1. How can I differentiate instruction so that more of my students succeed? The answer is research-based strategies. Because different strategies highlight different styles of thinking, they can help teachers reach more students—especially those students who feel that their styles of thinking are ignored in school.
2. I’ve got Common Core State Standards and state assessment tests staring me down. How can I help my students develop the skills they need to be successful? Again research-based strategies are a good answer because strategies build core academic skills.
3. How can I increase student engagement? Research-based strategies, because they use what we call “motivational levers” like controversy, choice, competition, challenge, and curiosity to capture student interest and secure their commitment to learning.
4. How can I deepen student understanding? Research-based strategies, because we know from the research of Robert Sternberg (2006) that using multiple styles of teaching leads to greater retention, deeper comprehension, and higher achievement scores. Citing a number of studies involving students of different grade levels across a wide range of content areas, Sternberg reports that students in courses that emphasized different styles of instruction did better on both objective tests and performance assessments. Sternberg concludes that multi-style instruction raises achievement because it “enables students to capitalize on their strengths and to correct or to compensate for their weaknesses, encoding material in a variety of interesting ways” (pp. 33-34).
In short, strategies help teachers do their work better while, at the same time, helping students become better thinkers and learners.

Element Two: Applying Strategies to the Right Classroom Situations
It’s important to understand that knowing some strategies does not ensure teacher effectiveness. In fact, the same lines of research that give us our strategies also carry a warning. For example, a new analysis of teacher effectiveness by Peggy Schooling, Michael Toth, and Robert Marzano (2010) shows that simply using research-based strategies in the classroom does not guarantee that student learning will increase. In fact, the research shows that some teachers use research-based strategies and see negative results. Why?
One reason is that teachers may be using the wrong strategies at the wrong time. Because different strategies are suited to different types of lessons, applying a strategy without first aligning it to clear  instructional outcomes can hinder student learning. In response, we developed the Strategic Dashboard,a simple one-page decision-making tool built off the findings of some of today’s leading thinkers in education. Each of the 20 strategies in The Strategic Teacher comes with its own Strategic Dashboard in order to make it easy for teachers to decide when a strategy is right for their particular objectives. Read on here or download for more…Read more  or download from here …TheStrategicTeacher-BetterInstruction

http://www.thoughtfulclassroom.com/PDFs/TheStrategicTeacher-BetterInstruction.pdf

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (8)

CONTINUED FROM THE LAST POST

71.We need to ask ourselves if schools are positively helpful or just a waste of time to many children these days.

72.Should tutors not be remunerated through a payment by results system?

73.Should schools’ terminal examinations be set and marked internally?

74.Do tutors ever bother to arouse and keep up curiosity of students in their subjects? Tutors / Schools should be facilitators of learning helping students to be creative and to grow socially, emotionally, intellectually physically, morally, and spiritually – Unfortunately, these days, the facilitators are musicians and perhaps churches to some extent but not schools and tutors.

75.A well-mapped out curriculum is no guarantee that learning takes place. For that to happen teachers who are reasonably competent to motivate students are needed. Incompetent tutors can destroy any teaching program however well-prepared.

76.Considering limited school time how many schools actually set out to get the most out of every minute of the teaching day?A teacher’s work is that of a guided discovery to enable children make discoveries they would not have encountered on their own.

77.Do teachers and schools go all-out to recognize the 3 intelligence types in their students? These are:
a) Natural intelligence based on genes
b) Intelligence based on socialization and type of home environment.
c) Intelligence shown through continuous assessment and terminal tests in schools.
If so what do they actually do to help students classified within a and c since those in b are generally regarded as the business of government and parents? Here we see again that the job of schools and tutors is to find ways to help children who might not find learning that easy.

78.Why do we love using useless maxims and bogus terminologies such as “purpose–built”, “cognitive”,” adaptive” ,”psycho-motor” etc. to mask what students should have experienced when in fact most of them do not? And we know it is because of limited imagination by schools and tutor. Or don’t we? Why don’t we just get up to do the work which is to make students learn how to teach themselves and keep up thinking in a progressive direction? Some tutors talk too much without allowing for participation by their students. In some cases classroom control by tutors is very weak. Even some teachers (depending on the type of schools they work in) usually assume that a certain % of students will fail. The results from such assumptions are faulty unrealistic lesson plans. In fact lesson planning (lesson notes) taking care of individual problems are non-existent in many cases. And while in classrooms tutors must always focus or spend some time on subject concepts and principles.

79.Schools must also aim at “tough love” for students. Discipline must be enforced where necessary by caning and more authority need to be delegated down the line. To do this effectively we need small schools not “Mega” schools. Pupils will be well known. “Small” is not necessarily beautiful in all respects but “Anonymous” is certainly unhelpful in an educational context! Many children in government mega schools may best be described as “Master and Miss Anonymous”.

80.Education is different from schooling and from instruction. But our national education policy’s focus is on schooling and instruction mainly.

TO BE CONTINUED

UNILAG STUDENTS REACT UNFAVORABLY TO YESTERDAY’S ANTI-JAMB PROTEST AT THEIR GATE!

1.WHAT CAUSED THE PROTEST?…NOTICE FROM UNILAG SHOWN BELOW

IMPORTANT NOTICE ON NEW POLICY ON ELIGIBILITY OF CANDIDATES FOR 2015/2016 ADMISSION EXERCISE

The Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) at its 2015 Combined Policy Meeting, held on July 14, 2015 in Abuja, announced the adoption of a policy whereby candidates of universities with surplus applicants for the Unified Matriculation Examinations (UTME) are reassigned to other universities with lower number of candidates than their capacities.

According to the Registrar/CEO of JAMB, Professor Dibu Ojerinde, the policy portends two benefits:

It will be beneficial to “needy Universities” that is universities with lower number of candidates than their capacities, as this will ensure that these universities will have more candidates to admit.

Candidates will have better chances for admission in the universities they are re-assigned to, contrary to situations where they would await admission in the universities of their first choices until the admission exercise closes and they forfeit admission in that session.

This policy has been implemented with immediate effect. Consequently, the eligibility for Post-UTME screening in the University of Lagos like other universities in Nigeria has been determined by JAMB. In effect, only candidates whose names were forwarded to the University of Lagos by JAMB are eligible for the 2015/2016 post-UTME screening.

This means that only candidates whose details have been forwarded to the University of Lagos by the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) and published on the link: admissions.unilag.edu.ng are eligible for the 2015/2016 Post-UTME screening exercise.Candidates, who will not be sixteen (16) years of age by 31st October, 2015 are not eligible and need not apply.

Ineligible candidates would have been re-assigned by JAMB to other universities. Such candidates should contact JAMB for assistance.

http://www.unilag.edu.ng/newsdetails.php?NewsID=2225

COMMENTS

2.Protesters WERE NOT UNILAG STUDENTS but mobilized themselves through social networks mainly.

3.The gains of the protest is doubtful because they were mainly INTENDING STUDENTS and their parents.It appears no University official or officer of the SUG bothered to address them.

REACTIONS

4.Many students of Unilag feel the protest should have been at the JAMB office in Ikoyi. Here are some of the comments made by them and others on the net especially NL

a.Please that woman am seeing in the pic, is she protesting for her grand children or for her children or for herself? (She was protesting for her child)

b.I don’t think there is much you guys can do once the schools consents to this. Just keep praying sha, Jamb has no say really. It all boils down to the school because Jamb could do nothing when PUME was introduced.

c.Why are you guys going to protest at Unilag gate? Are they the ones that came up with the new policy? Shouldn’t that be done at the JAMB office?Do you tthink UNILAG does not like the income they generate from thousands of Post utme candidates yearly when they know 70% don’t stand a chance? This one is bad market for them because JAMB has limited the number of candidates to those who are truly eligible knowing that those 5 schools are competitive.

d.They are helping you so you don’t spend a year sitting at home after being denied admission by the top 5 when there are other schools who could have given you admission. Reduces the crime rate and pregnancy rate in my opinion.

e.How can you score 200 and be thinking of Unilag? I scored 270 in my time and still didnt make merit list. I made supplementary cos I knew someone.

f.This is a nice initiative. I just don’t support the private university option but it was necessary so the private universities don’t cry foul after all they are recognised by NUC. Its left to you to either go there or not.That still remains the best way to go about issues like this.

g.Tell me, if Mtn deducts #1000 from ur account will u carry cardboard to the guy who sold u the sim or will u give their customer care a call? #follow due Protocol! And life will be easier.

h.Still waiting for my telefone to fully charge before I start my missionary journey to finding Jamb office in Ikoyi. *My advice to Jambiters: do not stage any protest at these instuitions because it will eventually lead to rioting and when dem gbab you or break ya head skul don finish be that Ooo (besides the decision has been made and implementations has started too)…Just thread carefully and lastly, don’t fall for some cheap talkers tabi fraudsters dis time around! Go out there and source for the info you need to forge ahead because time don dey go already. Admission runs ends 31st of OCTOBER 2015!

i.I tried contacting Jamb with the phone numbers they gave, but you won’t believe they switched off their phones. One of the calls was forwarded to a strange number but it was cut off immediately. We all have to stand together against this injustuce. Try calling these numbers:

08072522813
07031283713
08080116631
07031283662

j.Trying to call JAMB? Very funny… Even when the this issue was not up, nobody picks. Their numbers simply don’t work. Have you tried sending an email to UTMERegistration.info@jamb.gov.ng.

k.Unilag is not responsible for your predicament in ANY way.This is totally the fault of JAMB.

l.Going for a protest in front of the school gate will change nothing. Do you expect them to force jamb to send them more names?

m.It’s the prospective students that are protesting, not Unilag students. TAKE NOTE!

n.Too many students want to attend UNILAG and the university cannot admit more than available space for new students.Many classes are overcrowded and many of the students are not getting the best education, but they don’t care, because they just want to be students and graduates of UNILAG. This is why they are protesting. Although I think they need to be at JAMB office, not unilag gate

MORE SCHOOLS RELEASE POST-UTME 2015 DETAILS DESPITE PROTEST AGAINST JAMB’S CONTROVERSIAL ADMISSION POLICY!

ASK US FOR DETAILS OR VISIT THEIR WEBSITES

Delta State Poly Ozoro Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark Eligibility And Registration Details

ESUT Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUTO Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And registration Details

FUTA Post-UTME/DE 2015:Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUOYE Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

MOUA Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUOtuoke Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

AAU Post-UTME/DE 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

UNILAG Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-Off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

For unilag students, you can check your eligibility status by following these steps:
1): Go to Unilag website http://www.unilag.edu.ng
2) Go to Prospective Students
3) Click on Full Time Undergraduate Admission
4) Click on POST-UTME APPLICATION
5) Insert your utme registration number, telephone number and email address.

Augustine University Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

PREFERABLY GET CORRECT INFO BY VISITING THOSE NEAREST TO YOU INSTEAD OF BEING DECEIVED

COMPREHENSIVE LIST WILL BE UPDATED THIS COMING WEEKEND

Parents, candidates protest as UNILAG defends cut-off marks

A cross-section of parents and UTME candidates protesting against the University of Lagos cut-off marks in Lagos...on Wednesday.

Hundreds of Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination candidates on Wednesday morning stormed the University of Lagos to protest against the decision of the institution to stop them from doing the forthcoming post-UTME.

The candidates alleged that the authorities of university, in liaison with the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board, had rolled out a new admission procedure that prevented them from taking the examination to secure admission into the ivory tower.

Their allegation comes as UNILAG and JAMB defended their different positions in the exercise.

The Head of Public Relations, JAMB, Dr. Benjamin Fabian, said the board did not intentionally exclude any candidate.

He said, “We are only trying to ensure that candidates have better chances for admission this year unlike what obtained in the past. This time around, we do not want to wait till universities end their first choice admissions. We do not want some candidates to forfeit their admission easily. By next week, we shall release the national distribution list that will open more opportunities for them.”

The Registrar, UNILAG, Dr. Taiwo Ipaye, said the university was only working with the post- UTME screening list sent by JAMB.

According to her, only candidates whose names were forwarded to the University of Lagos by JAMB are eligible for the 2015/2016 post-UTME screening.

Meanwhile, many of the candidates, who came with their parents, had converged on the university entrance as early as 7am, chanting solidarity songs and demanding the removal of the JAMB Registrar, Prof. Dibu Ojerinde.

Their action not only caused gridlock at the entrance of the university, it later resulted in the closure of the gate.

The protesters, led by the President, Association of Tutorial School Operators of Nigeria, Mr. Sodunke Oludotun, later forced their way into the university.

According to the protesters, the university upped its cut-off to 250 marks against the recommended 180 marks by JAMB.

JAMB, on July 14 had after its sixth consultative meeting with stakeholders in Abuja, pegged the cut-off mark to 180 for candidates seeking university admission and 150 marks for those seeking places in polytechnics and colleges of education.

Oludotun, who spoke to our correspondent, described the upping of the cut-off marks at UNILAG as illegal.

He said, “Contrary to Prof. Dibu Ojerinde’s announcement of 180 as a minimum score, UNILAG has started selling post-UTME form for only the candidates that scored 250 and above and thereby putting the lives of about 24, 000 qualified and prospective candidates in a state of uncertainty and despair. We are protesting to call the attention of the Federal Government to this injustice.”

Copyright PUNCH.

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (4)

31.Tutors should be made to submit weekly WORK DONE Sheets detailing any administrative duty done in addition to academic ones.

32.Lesson Notes are supposed to be checked by School Management specifically by HODs before actual lessons. But no one is really checking them in most schools. We need to find a solution to this.

33.Each public school should run like a business unit having definable goals/aims within our broad National Education Policy and possibility for revision of achievement after every academic session. Principals will act like CEO’s and each school team will be taken through relevant training on modern management methods for best practices.

34.Consequently each Principal must give leadership to both staff and students under him like private schools or like a head of a private business organization ensuring that departments or students that are weak or less strategic about their studies are properly mentored and pulled up by their bootstraps if need be. It also implies that the attitude of being a civil servant for a limited number of hours per day will no longer hold. He or she will become a doctor ready to rise to school and students’ needs even at odd hours of the day.

35.Remediation efforts should be taken more seriously than is being done presently with classification of students according to their needs. After-school programmes between 2pm and 4pm on Mondays to Fridays and on Saturdays between 10am and 4pm should be applied.

36.Each student in SS1-SS3 should have a mentor/life coach among the teaching staff. Each staff should not have more than 8-10 students to mentor at any time. We have put up what should be the daily working routine for each mentor on this blog. For JS1-JS3 mentors should be appointed for them from more strategic students in SS1-SS3.They should also be properly briefed on what to do such that mentoring duties do not interfere with their own studies.

37.It is advisable that retired but seasoned educationists closest to each school be invited for planning and execution of Remediation programs Such invitation will need some pay so should be done through zonal offices of  each state’s MOE.Such educationists may be most useful for supervision of all after-school programs

38.The physical environment of each school especially landscaping should be enhanced. The school walls and gates should be repaired and made to look decent. Both should be important parts of attendance and lateness control arrangements. Simple walkways should be demarcated by painted white stones and greenery grown and tended to by students. The environment should be one that students are happy to come to each day.

39.For each public school working facilities such as water borehole, and clean toilets need be provided. There should also be a medium-sized generator to power a water-pumping machine and the most important offices/rooms like the science laboratories.

40.The local management committee made up mainly of parents can help raise funds for water borehole, generator, fuel and general maintenance. The expected effect of implementing paragraphs 38 and 39 will be to narrow some of the gap in the appearance of public and private schools

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR.

 

1. Gather all past but living Education Ministers and Ministers of State at Obudu Hlls. We know that China would have had all of them shot to pieces. But since that is not in our nature we need to be more realistic in our approach to the problem. So we should ask them to:
-List achievements during their tenures.
-List what they regard as pitfalls in Educational Administration in Nigeria.

2. Make it mandatory that our current education top hats genuinely review and seek the advice of the former Minister of Education Mrs.Oby Ezekwesili at least once a month. Because it was during her period something relevant and revolutionary for education appeared on the horizon for our nation.

3. Divide the Education Ministry into two for higher education and for lower education. Thereafter move them into separate locations for individuality as follows:
-Higher Education for Universities, Polytechnics, Colleges of Education and approved Diploma-awarding Vocational Centers.
-Lower Education for Secondary Schools, Primary Schools, Vocational and Technical education.
To emphasize the importance of the steps to be taken, the two Ministries should be headed by two cabinet-ranked Ministers who are not politicians and who should have terms of office guaranteed and renewable like the Chairman of INEC.

4.Merge most parastatals related to Education under them and create an agency under the Presidency which shall regularly audit through a group of external auditors the hardware and software assets, goals and achievement of these Education Ministries vis-à-vis our National Education Policy. The auditors must itemize the most important weaknesses to the President once in a year in simple unpretentious language and what needs to be done urgently.

5. Close down the Education Trust Fund (ETF) since it has failed in the main to achieve what it was set up for and let the two ministries take over its functions and staff. Same for other parastatals such as the one for the UBE. Thereafter transfer non-personnel funds to the states to use directly on education. The states can also absorb some staff from the parastatals penciled for closure.

6. Set up a new Education Advisory Board to put up polices BASED ON THE OLD EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM OF NURSERY/PRIMARY, SECONDARY/HSC AND HIGHER STUDIES as listed above. With a new and more realistic National Education Policy, we can then move forward to other micro but important issues

7.Make it mandatory for all private schools to pay at least the minimum wage or same staff salaries as those in public schools This means that staff in such private schools can earn more only if they do provide services additional to what is expected of public school tutors.

8. Make it a crime for private schools to offer ridiculous salaries such as N12,000 per month to graduates. The higher cost of running these private schools will be passed to parents by good schools. Those parents who cannot afford it will move their children back to public schools while interest in public schools will grow.

9. Set up local management teams for each public secondary school made up of parents having children in those schools. They are to work hand in hand with each school management and help raise money from friends and private businesses to meet school needs such as landscaping water supply, toilets facilities, some science lab materials, library books but excluding ANY staff costs including security. These of course shall be In addition whatever is provided by the Federal, State governments and LGAs.

10. Government (all the 3-tiers) must look at  critical needs of each school both public and private and join hands to set-up time-tables for meeting these needs.

O.O.ODUMOSU EX-PROPRIETOR OF MASON COLLEGE AND PASS TUTORIAL SCHOOLS BOTH LOCATED IN FESTAC

TO BE CONTINUED

HOW TO BE A MEDIOCRE TEACHER

HOW TO BE A MEDIOCRE TEACHERIt’s not clear if the same applies for police officers, dentists, airline pilots, or other professionals, but it seems true for educators.

Most educators either improve dramatically their first few years through a combination of effort, imagination, reflection, and constant professional development, or they leave the classroom entirely.

So you’ve got to admire the mediocre teacher in that they exist in schools at all. They’re the survivors in the school building, able to withstand crushing district programs, and decade after decade of government mandates to keep on keeping on. If there is ever a zombie apocalypse (or any kind of apocalypse for that matter), find the closest mediocre teacher and follow them.

So how does a teacher remain mediocre in the face so much opportunity to improve?

1. Try to please everyone

Parents, colleagues, principals, instructional coaches, district personnel, and your twitter-based Professional Learning Network will often have divergent ideas, agendas, and advice. Do your best to fulfill all of their pleadings and demands, with very little sense of priority. When you’re a teacher, everyone is your boss.

2. Act alone

In education, as a teacher you are the designer, actuator, judge, jury, and executioner. Instead of merely connecting students and the curriculum with the community, parents, administrators, and district officials, rather act as the spokesperson for it all. Explain district policy to parents. Justify school mediocrity to local business leaders.

Be called to task by news media.

Advocate for personalized curriculum to audiences that won’t understand the need.

Insist on 21st century technology for 21st century learners in the face of budgets that can’t possibly sustain it.

Also, don’t make the mistake of creating a transparent curriculum so that all stakeholders can clearly see what’s happening when and pitch in accordingly. Instead make it all go through you–and verbally if possible.

As the teacher, you’re the focal point, gosh darnit. Martyrs unite.

3. Keep the learning in the classroom

Dovetailing behind #2, whatever you do, never, ever design learning experiences so that learners and their families naturally work together. Keep the learning in the classroom where it can be measured and verified by an expensive (and resource-sapping) battery of tests.

4. Forget that you’re really there to please the students

You’re not there for the students as human beings—to spark, inspire, and intellectually care-take. Instead, believe that you’re there for the sake of the literacy rates and proficiency of the students. After all, that is being there for the students. They’ll thank you when they can read the dosage instruction on the medication they take because they’re 32 and making $28,000 a year in a soulless, life-sucking job and are forced to send their 3 children to schools and live in communities not much different than the ones that produced their life’s mediocre arc.

5. Believe that children are not books to be read, but books to be written

As adults, we know what’s best for students. We aren’t there to discover or assist in discovery, or support families in creating sustainable learning patterns for life-long self-improvement, but rather to help students master content. We were brought up the same way, and by golly look at us. All healthy, thriving, well-balanced adults changing the world one student at a time. Yeehaw.

6. Worry about China, looming technologies, the Mayan calendar, etc.

Be sure to project your insecurities on the students to help brace them for what’s coming, rather than the world they live and breath in now. Prepare them for the uncertain future!

7. Use the same (or extremely similar) units and lessons each year

The great thing about teaching is, once you get through the first year, it gets so much easier, Your units and lessons are done. Assessments are finished. Novels are chosen, projects are designed, guest-speakers are selected, field trips are planned. You’re on cruise control. You may need to go in and tweak things here or there, but learning is learning, am I right?

No need to reinvent the wheel. Stick with what works!

8. Don’t ask the students for ideas

Asking the students for ideas gives students the illusion that they are in control, or have anything but a superficial investment in the learning process. Passivity is so much easier for classroom management! What kinds of ideas would they come up with anyway? Free homework passes, open-book tests, and a marathon of Jersey Shore, Call of Duty, and Spongebob Squarepants.

The fact that students can’t even begin to come up with the first compelling idea for learning says nothing about how long ago they “checked out” of the learning process. It’s because they’re kids! When they start paying some bills, then they’ll understand what real responsibility is.

9. Give very little attention to tiering or scaffolding

Scaffolding helps all learners have work within their Zone of Proximal Development. Tiering is a super simple process that helps create lessons and assessments or using innovative grouping strategies, but it only makes more work for you. Who has the time?!

10. Minimize reflection

Reflection is perhaps the most powerful of all improvement strategies. Formally and informally taking a look back at what happened—after a Socrative Discussion, a day, or a unit—is for people that have time. If mediocrity is what you’re after, conjure up only brief little episodes of reflection—and then, either feel sorry for yourself for how awful it went, or ignore the data and focus on all the “feel good” moments. You’re never as good as you think you are, and you’re never as bad as you think you are either.

Or that’s the lie going around anyway.

Image via flickr user peterhuys; How To Be A Mediocre Teacher

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/how-to-be-a-mediocre-teacher/#

TO NIGERIAN TEACHERS…”HOW TO MAKE LEARNING RELEVANT TO YOUR STUDENTS (AND WHY IT’S CRUCIAL TO THEIR SUCCESS)” (1)

HOW TO MAKE LEARNING RELEVANT TO YOUR STUDENTS (AND WHY IT’S CRUCIAL TO THEIR SUCCESS) (1)

relevance

We’ve all heard our students ask the question, “When will I ever use this in the real world?” And honestly, it’s a great question–one that we should all spend more time thinking about.

Research shows that relevant learning means effective learning, and that alone should be enough to get us rethinking our lesson plans. The old drill-and-kill method is neurologically useless, as it turns out. Relevant, meaningful activities that both engage students emotionally and connect with what they already know are what help build neural connections and long-term memory storage.

“Long lists of vocabulary words that don’t have personal relevance or don’t resonate with a topic about which the student has been engaged are likely to be blocked by the brain’s affective (or emotional) filters,” writes neurologist and former educator Judy Willis.

“The traditional building block curriculum, which devotes substantial parts of initial courses to basic theory, could demotivate students if they could not see how the theory was applicable to the discipline or profession.”

Plus, says Willis, it’s necessary for learners to attach a new piece of information to an old one, or it just won’t stick. The brain stores information in the form of neural pathways, or networks. If a student acquires new information that’s unrelated to anything already stored in his brain, it’s hard for the new information to get into those networks because it has no scaffolding to cling to. Effective teaching helps students recognise patterns and put new information in context with the old–a crucial part of passing new working memories into the brain’s long-term storage areas.

Students need a personal connection to the material, whether that’s through engaging them emotionally or connecting the new information with previously acquired knowledge. Without that, students may not only disengage and quickly forget, but they may also lose the motivation to try.

Often, “the learner’s emotional reaction to the outcome of his efforts … shapes his future behaviour,” write cognitive neuroscientist and educational psychologist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and Harvard doctoral candidate Matthias Faeth in Mind, Brain, and Education: Neuroscience Implications for the Classroom.

In other words, if a student doesn’t believe a particular activity is interesting, relevant, or within the scope of his capabilities, it’s probably not going to sink in.

Another article interviewed 36 undergraduate students about aspects of the teaching and learning environment which motivated or demotivated their study. It was found that students were motivated by a teaching environment characterised by eight main elements. This article reports in detail on the element of establishing relevance, as this seemed very important to the interviewees. The interviewees found that teaching abstract theory alone was demotivating.

Relevance could be established through showing how theory can be applied in practice, establishing relevance to local cases, relating material to everyday applications, or finding applications in current newsworthy issues.

algebra-relevant

Without relevance, important concepts may seen unnecessary.

“The traditional building block curriculum, which devotes substantial parts of initial courses to basic theory, could demotivate students if they could not see how the theory was applicable to the discipline or profession,” the authors write. “The problem could be alleviated by a course which revealed a curriculum map showing the application of basic material in more advanced courses, or by early periods of exposure to professional practice in professional programmes.”

“Professional programmes faced a double-edged sword with respect to relevance in that it could be established by demonstrating that material was relevant to a future career. However, students could easily become demotivated if they could not see the relevance of theoretical material, since they had chosen a professional programme in the expectation that it would prepare them well for their future career.”

So how can we make learning more relevant, exactly? Below are a few ideas to help you get started.
Defining Personal Relevance

“From my educational experiences 23 years as a student, 10 years as a public school teacher, and currently as a university teaching assistant, ” says educational psychologist Robin Roberson, “I am convinced that relevance is one of the most important aspects of teaching and learning. I know that as a student, the content I found most relevant was the easiest to learn, so as a teacher, I believe it is my job to help students see the relevance in content they may not find inherently interesting. I know that if I do this, my students will engage in class and be motivated to work outside of class.”

But relevance is a difficult concept to examine. It is mentioned in the education literature, but usually as an aside and seldom with an explanation as to its nature or structure. In an informal survey of the six educational psychology books in Roberson’s personal library, only one mentioned relevance but did not define it.

“From my educational experiences 23 years as a student, 10 years as a public school teacher, and currently as a university teaching assistant, ” says educational psychologist Robin Roberson, “I am convinced that relevance is one of the most important aspects of teaching and learning.”

“Based on my experiences, I define relevance as the perception that something is interesting and worth knowing. When a teacher provides relevance for a student, the teacher helps the student perceive these two things.”

This aligns relatively well with the theory of relevance found in the related area of cognitive science. Wilson and Sperber (2004) put forth this theory in the mid-80s which posits: utterances raise expectations of relevance not because speakers are expected to obey a Co-operative Principle and maxims or some other specifically communicative convention, but because the search for relevance is a basic feature of human cognition, which communicators may exploit.

Simply put, when a teacher provides relevance for a student, the teacher conveys his or her intentions to the student by tapping into that student’s cognitive need to make sense of the world.

“Many attempt to add relevance to otherwise uninteresting content by focusing efforts on creating interest,” Roberson says. “They do this by adding in anything that draws attention, like flashy digital presentations, humour or games. These may attract the attention of students, but, if the content that follows is not substantive or well explained so that students find it engaging and worth knowing, then their attention will likely wane. The students will remember the flashiness, humour or who won/lost the game, but they will not remember the content.”

So, no matter how disinteresting content may seem, once students have determined that the content is worth knowing, it will hold their attention and engage them.

“I am not saying that flashy presentations, humour and games are useless in a lesson; I am saying that if those are used, they need to lead to learning about content that is relevant.”
Personal Relevance in Practice

In a 2008 article published in Active Learning in Higher Education Kember et al found that one of the most important means of motivating student learning was to establish relevance. The authors interviewed students from 9 undergraduate programs at 3 different universities in Hong Kong, to charaterise the teaching and learning environments that best motivated student learning.

Establishing relevance was the most prominent and often cited student response. Relevance is a key component to intrinsically motivating student learning. By establishing both personal and real-world relevance, students are provided with an important opportunity to relate the course subject matter to the world around them, and to assimilate it in accordance with their previously held assumptions and beliefs. Relevance is a key factor in providing a learning context in which students construct their own understanding of the course material.

In the study, students pointed to four methods for establishing relevance:

Discussing how theory can be applied in practice
Making a link to local cases
Relating subject matter to everyday applications
Discussing and finding applications in current newsworthy issues and events.

Likewise, Wieman (2007) recommended that students be provided with intentional and explicit opportunities to discuss, for each topic covered, why this topic is worth learning, how it operates in the real world, why it makes sense, and how it connects to things the student already knows.

TO BE CONTINUED NEXT POST

Cited From: opencolleges.edu.au