WHY TEACHING IS STILL THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD

1. The potential to transform lives – ask any teacher who has helped a student in any number of ways, from academic to welfare and emotional learning, and they will tell you that life is not only good, but amazing.

2. It gives you the chance to be continuously creative – of course there are increasing levels of accountability in teaching, but teachers are allowed to be creative in every lesson. Even in observations, in fact most of all in observations, lessons are encouraged to be creative and interesting to engage the students. Teachers have so many opportunities to try new ideas, and indulge in iterative process to ensure the optimum learning environment is created.

3. It offers you a chance to continuously get better – teachers are not only encouraged to seek continuous professional development, but can ask for observation on a regular basis, to provide opportunities to grow and learn from masters or more experienced practitioners. In so few professions is there such support, and considering that as a minimum, contracts are for a year, teachers have so much time to demonstrate improvement. A growth mindset is part of the foundation of teaching.

4. It is a grounding, humbling profession – the amount of work teachers do compared to remuneration is shockingly disproportionate, in 2 senses: firstly, in terms of how many paid vs non paid hours of work they receive, and secondly, in relation to other similarly creative and important (and not so important) vocations in our society. But that is not why teachers teach. So few teachers go into the vocation for the salary – it’s a calling before anything else.

5. There is always satisfaction somewhere – teaching is a calling, and no one enters it without his or her inner voice telling him or her that. Of course there are always some imposters, but the massive majority have their hearts in the right place. How cool is that for the students?

Having said that, teaching can be and is incredibly demanding, and often we can lose sight of that calling, bogged down in aspects of the profession that don’t seem to be connected to it. But on closer inspection, most of the extra demands are actually central to the job itself: explaining to parents where you are coming from; being observed; collaborating with others; marking.

Take this last aspect, crucial to understanding whether students are learning what you believe you are teaching. Yes, it is very time consuming, but perhaps one of the most important and fundamental weapons in a teacher’s arsenal; any good school will understand this and the other cited demands, and create an environment where they become part of directed time.

It is when these aspects are not acknowledged in directed time that the conditions for burnout are rife.

6. It’s a chance to truly to lead the world in the 21st century – introducing students to new technologies and ways of presenting, curating, and collaborating with others with what they know is truly exciting and truly invigorating. Modern teachers are actually pioneering pedagogy, and can and will be able to hold their heads up high in the future when we look back and see how learning in this day and age took a radical but enormously beneficial turn for the better.

Engaging students in greater collaboration, and instilling initiative in curation and the promotion of information leads to truly independent learning, and setting up such learning environments is an opportunity that all teachers now have before them. There are few more gratifying feelings that being needed.

7. The children.

By Paul Moss

Source: Why Teaching Is The Best Job In The World

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HOW DO YOU REWARD A COUNTRY THAT MADE IT POSSIBLE FOR YOU TO READ MANY WONDERFUL BOOKS?

HOW DO YOU REWARD A COUNTRY THAT MADE IT POSSIBLE FOR YOU TO READ MANY WONDERFUL BOOKS?

Books & Blaces For Trouble

HOW do you reward a country that made it possible for you to read wonderful books in magic blaces (places to those who follow the western alphabets! How can Trouble reward Nigeria for the incredible life the country made possible for him? What is the value of reading In the Castle of My Skin on the streets of Bridgetown Barbados? George Lamming’s first novel, first published in London in 1970, depicts the life of the writer growing up in one of the most English of the British colonies of the world. It is so soaked in Englishness that Bajans considered their island nation one of the southern counties of good old England.

What can one give to read one of the detective novels of Donna Leone in one of the water taxis of Venice? What is the monetary value of picking up a book like Shakespeare in Venice – Exploring the City with Shylock and Othello by Shaul Bassi and Alberto Toso Fei in one of the bookshops of Venice? And to wonder with the authors if Shakespeare ever visited Venice or just used the Googles of his days to be in Venice and chronicle the racist behaviour of those high falutin leadership of the city state of Venice?

And to read Al-Liss wa-l-Kilab (The Thief and the Dogs) of Nagib Mahfouz on the streets of Cairo and even attempt to find a publisher for a translation done with a fellow Egyptian student long before the Nobel Prize for Literature exposed the Egyptian shy writer to the world. It was one of those jumble books sales on the streets of Cairo (kullu haga thalatha! – everything three kobo!) that was found the Arabic translation of Cyprian Ekwensi’s People of the City.

Albert Camus’s L’Etranger takes place on the beaches of Algiers where a particular slant of the sun’s rays makes the narrator shoot an Arab without any remorse. For someone whose feelings to his mother were clearly ambivalent, this was not so strange! To read this book in Algiers while serving time with the Arab League temporarily relocated to Tunis from Cairo. And now to look forward to reading the response of an Algerian native writer, writing back to Albert Camus, restoring humanity to that anonymous Arab shot by the narrator and questioning the life that made that possible.

The excitement that came with the announcement that the Tourism ministry of Ondo State was setting up a theme forest at Igbo Olodumare, the setting for the classical Yoruba novel of D.O. Fagunwa Igbo Olodumare, (The Lord’s Forest) was not to be measured. Here after driving through a motor path no different from many motor paths of Nigeria to arrive in these still pristine jungles, fiercely protected from tree hunters and forest thieves, and begin to read “Losangangan ijosi, nigbati . . . (Some long ago afternoon, after my second meal of the day. . . ) is a delight not to be monetised. Here, you will encounter the usual dwellers of the world of D.O. Fagunwa like Ogongo, the King of Birds, Ojola-Ibinu, the human headed snake of ill-repute determined to kill all humans, Esu Kekere Ode, Tembelekun, Ologbojakadi, all those phantom personalities that troubled your youthful nightmares after days of reading Fagunwa!

What about the short stories of Njabulo Ndebele located in the apartheid era townships of South Africa such as Soweto (made up of the first two letters of South Western Township)? The stories that make up the collection Fools and Other Stories describe the lives of Africans as if the apartheid government legalised racism did not exist and thereby wakes the reader into a nightmare of everyday existence.

No other writer from the Third World troubled Trouble more than the Trinidadian writer V.S. Naipaul. From his hilarious collection of short stories to his heavily biased novels of the seventies and eighties, Naipaul had chosen to blame the victim for his or her troubles. Yet one wondered as you throng the modern city streets of Port of Spain, the car choked capital of Trinidad, how someone like Naipaul, made possible by an island scholarship, could turn so English that he felt that he came with them to colonise the Tropics of the world. Particularly painful is his fascinating narrative of a journey through the Caribbean entitled The Middle Passage – The Caribbean Revisited . It is in this book that Naipaul comes to what can be considered a terrible conclusion thus: The history of the islands can never be satisfactorily told. Brutality is not the only difficulty. History is built around achievements and creation: and nothing was created in the West Indies.” To read this book travelling from one island nation to another researching a book on Caribbean theatre and drama was to suffer the indignity of the proud African in search of creation and achievement around the world.

But we are talking of books and places. What about Leningrad, today renamed by the successor state of Russia to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, St. Petersburg, ok, its original name? The narrative poems of Pushkin read where he had his fatal duel, the novels of Dostoyevsky, dramatically reprieved from a hanging to write such fantastic novels as The Gambler, a short novel that Trouble reads at least once every year!

It is a delight to read that a novel entitled The Fishermen by the Nigerian novelist Chigozie Obioma has made this year’s long list of the Booker Prize. Of particular interest to Dafida Trouble is that the novel’s actions take place in Akure, capital of Ondo State. One looks forward to read the book. Much of the activity in the novel centres around Omi Ala, the Ala River which, as everybody knows, marks out the town of Akure. After all, the oriki (praise names) of Akure is that it has two rivers and both are called Ala! There is one Ala in town and there is another Ala in the rural areas where both the subsistence and commercial crops farms reside.

How do we ensure that every generation gets such an education that makes this and even more possible?
Kole Omotoso

THE EDUCATION MINISTER BUHARI SHOULD APPOINT

THE EDUCATION MINISTER BUHARI SHOULD APPOINT

President Muhammadu Buhari has assured Nigerians that he would name his ministers this month. This is good news, especially for those who think the President’s pace is slow because he doesn’t have a cabinet in place. But in appointing a minister of education, the President should be painstaking. He should adopt a business approach because education is real business; and we can’t go forward as a nation until we treat it as such.

If the President is able to fix education, Nigeria is likely to move forward at a faster pace than what obtains now. Education is central to our overall growth.

No doubt, the President has enormous powers to appoint whoever he likes (including his friends) as a minister, but choosing a minister of education should not be based on sentiments at all. What Nigeria needs today is a minister of education that understands the dynamics of globalisation of education, someone with a good grasp of the problem areas and enough capacity both in terms of intellect and political will to ensure quick fixes and positive changes.

So, for this particular position, President Buhari may have to look beyond his loyal friends, old acquaintances, party members or the people he thinks gave him 97 per cent of the votes. He should bear in mind that whatever he does now can either make or break the education sector.

Thankfully, a prominent member of the President’s All Progressives Congress, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, has also warned of the peril of ignoring education. Emphasising the importance of education to national growth at the maiden convocation of Adeleke University, Ede, Osun State, last Saturday, Tinubu said that Nigeria would remain a poor country without quality education.

Everyone seems to know the role of education in ameliorating poverty, building strong democracy, encouraging economic growth and achieving a world-class standard of living. But, what most people seem not to know is that there is a difference between talking and doing. Quality education is a product of serious planning and commitment.

If talking about our declining educational standard is the key to finding a solution to the problem, Nigeria would have gone far beyond where it is today. Unfortunately, despite our many years of hand-wringing, we are yet to formulate pragmatic policies that could move us forward. We are still producing graduates with little problem-solving skills and slow analytical minds.

So, moving forward, we need a minister of education that will focus attention on two major problem areas that have remained with us for ages. One is the need to make learning at primary and secondary schools more exciting via adequate provision of learning aids. And, two, is to address the problem of poor quality of teachers by making teaching both attractive and lucrative.

Is it not strange that, as a people, we easily understand the importance of building a house on a solid foundation and feign ignorance when it comes to building solid tertiary education on a strong primary and secondary school system? The truth is quality education will be a mirage in Nigeria if we continue to ignore the importance of well-trained and highly-paid teachers.

Many times we blame students for not doing well, forgetting that learning is a function of many variables. It is not by accident that countries that are doing well today are those that place great emphasis on recruiting the best of brains to train their children.

It is instructive that students in the highest-performing school systems in the world are found in Singapore, Hong Kong, Finland, Taiwan and South Korea. These are countries where teaching is very financially lucrative and attractive.

Three of the top-performing school systems in the world — those in Finland, Singapore and South Korea — recruit 100 per cent of their teachers from the top three best students of each graduating set. They tap their best for the job. No wonder companies like Nokia covet teachers who leave the classroom in Finland.

But what do we have here? Most of our teachers are accidental teachers. Admission requirement is lowered for applicants aspiring to go for teaching courses. The teaching profession is for those who can’t do anything better. Unfortunately, this poor image has affected genuine bright people who would have loved to choose teaching as a profession. How can we expect people that are below average to nurture our children to excellence?

If we want to be sincere, how many primary and secondary school teachers in Nigeria today can we vouch for as being really good at mathematics, science or technology? Yet, we claim to aim at technological advancement. We should be thinking of putting the teacher at the centre of our policy if we want to improve the quality of our education.

We need a minister that will draw people back into the teaching profession. We need teachers and classrooms that are technology savvy. The teaching profession should be competitive, rewarding and purposeful.

Teaching is still one of the most attractive professions in the United Kingdom. A recent research on the most attractive professions in the country found teaching to be number three on a list of top 10 professions.

To make teaching a good career option in the UK, the government at a time introduced, among others, training bursaries and tax-free scholarships worth £25,000 in mathematics, chemistry, physics and computing.

Not only that, its Department for Education developed a policy paper aimed at raising the status of the teaching profession and making it more attractive to top graduates. These are pragmatic steps taken by serious nations that desire true growth and development.

In Singapore, for instance, teaching talent is identified and nurtured. Teaching is also a competitive career. About eight candidates apply for every opening. Little wonder, Singapore is the highest performing country in Mathematics and Science, according to the PISA 2012 international tests.

The story of neglect of teachers is the same in almost all African countries today. They are not getting their priorities right. That is probably why the continent is lagging behind the developed countries in the area of development and technological advancement.

Since Nigeria is the giant of Africa, I think it should take the lead in providing practical education that can drive technological development for its citizens. It should start this process focusing on its teachers and by making the teaching profession more attractive.

http://www.punchng.com/columnists/frank-talk/the-education-minister-buhari-should-appoint/

 

HOW TO STOP EXAM CHEATING… 4 STEPS PLUS!

How to Stop Cheating

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

“The Road Not Taken” written by Robert Frost

Almost everyone wants to achieve good grades in school or pass The Exit Exam to graduate from High School. To accomplish this, some follow the path less traveled by and take the time to actually learn the material and do the work. But others cheat instead of taking the time to study. Whether you cheat all the time, or, like most students, once in a while, you can stop cheating, but only if you’re ready to quit cheating. Cheating counts as lying and stealing.

Steps

1.Decide that you want to stop cheating when you’re ready. No one except you can force you to stop. Need a little motivation? Think about what you will gain by doing your schoolwork.It won’t be easy. But, you can stop cheating when you’re ready to stop.

a.Knowledge- By doing your own work, you are becoming smarter. You are learning the material instead of transcribing it from someone else’s paper. When you are presented with the information again on a midterm or a final, you will have a much easier time remembering it.

b.Time Management skills- Everyone has a busy life. The typical high schooler has after school activities, dinner, then more stuff to do after dinner. Not to mention hanging out with friends, playing video games, talking on the phone, and every other leisurely activity that exists. So who has time for schoolwork? By not setting aside time for studying and homework outside of school, you are crippling yourself for life and you’ll fail the class. If your teachers catch you cheating they’ll wonder if you cheated on your other tests and they won’t trust you. It takes a lot of hard work to regain somebody’s trust and not everyone is willing to trust you again due to having trust issues. Getting into a habit of cheating can cause you to lose you your job. Make good habits now so you will have them as assets later in life. It’ll be much harder to stop cheating later on if you don’t quit now.

c.Respect- You will gain immense respect by not cheating. People will come to you for help instead of you going to them. Why? They will assume that you are smart. While you might not be a genius, you are making a very smart decision by not cheating.

2.So, now that you’ve decided to stop cheating, stop cheating.

a.Study. Study every day for three hours. However, if an emergency comes up, then you can study the next day. How well you know the information will determine how much you need to study. You have to understand fully and insert it in your head. Do not cram right before every test. Get into a study routine and study at the same time every day.

b.Prepare for tests. Get lots of sleep the night before and have a nourishing breakfast in the morning. Also, get extra help if you need it. It’s OK to ask for help.

c.Do your classwork and homework. Every classwork and homework assignment has a purpose. Do all of your classwork and homework to the best of your ability. It is better to guess than to get the right answer by copying.

d.Do your own work. You can still ask others for help. Just make sure you understand everything and that you are the one typing or writing.

3.Keep it up. It is easy to go back to your old habits. But, take the road not taken. A couple of years from now, you will be very happy you did.

4.Every time you get that little urge to cheat, remind yourself of the consequences. Remember the possibilities of getting caught, and remember that your teachers and parents are losing trust in you every time you cheat. Remind yourself that it is not worth it even if you do get away with it.

ADDITIONAL STUDY TIPS

1.Take notes during class, but write neatly so that you can read your own hand writing.

2.Remember the purpose of tests. It is to see how well the students know the information. If everyone in the class copied off the smartest kid, the teacher would think you all learned the information, when in reality, you hadn’t. So, when the teacher moves on and you are even more lost, it is your fault if you cheated.

3.As soon as you get home from school study in a room without distractions ie TVs and Computers. You’ll be able to concentrate on your homework. Don’t forget to turn your cell phone off while you’re studying so that you don’t get a text from your friends.

4.Be prepared for tests, quizzes, pop quizzes, and final exams.

5.If you have ADHD remember to take your medicine or Focus Factor so that you can pay attention during class.

6.Get a tutor. If you can’t afford to get a tutor go online and look for free online tutors. If you’re unable to do that due to not having a computer a lot of schools offer free tutoring after school.

7.If TV interferes with studying record your favorite shows via DVR so that you can watch them later. The TV and the Internet aren’t going anywhere.

8.Try not to let others cheat off you. Yeah, there are cases when you don’t want to get beaten up and you give others your homework. If that happens tell your teacher and the principal. You can ask them not to mention your name when they have a talk with said bully.

9.If you spend too much time on your social network sites and not enough time on your school books make your social networks restricted websites and leave an away message so that everyone won’t worry about you.

10.You can visit your teachers on your way to your next class or after school if you don’t get something. If you wind up late for your next class ask your teacher to write you a Hall Pass or sign your Agenda so that you don’t get in trouble. If you don’t have time to visit your teachers after school visit them before class begins the next morning.

http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Cheating

NECO RESULTS FOR JUNE/JULY 2015 SSCE EXAMS…TO LAUGH OR CRY?

68.5 per cent candidates pass 2015 NECO exam

THE National Examinations Council has released the June/July 2015 Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination results. The result showed a remarkable improvement when compared with previous examinations between 2011 and 2014.

The Registrar and Chief Executive Officer of NECO, Prof. Abdulrashid Garba, on Thursday announced the results at the council’s national headquarters in Minna, Niger State.

He observed that the results which showed 83.28 per cent credit pass in English Language and 80.74 per cent credit pass in Mathematics was an improvement on the previous exams conducted between 2011 and 2014.

Garba, who coincidentally marked his 100 days in office on Wednesday, said that 969,991 candidates registered for the examinations, out of which 969,491 sat for the papers with 68.56 per cent of the candidates obtaining five credits and above in five subjects including Mathematics and English.

Garba said in the comparative analysis of 2014 and 2015 June/July SSCE, it showed that in 2014, 978,886 candidates sat for the exam with 511,931 of the candidates obtaining credits in five subjects above, including English and Mathematics.

In the analysis of candidates’ performance by states, he said Delta State scored the highest in five credits and above, including English and Mathematics with 83.51 per cent and Edo State followed with 83.42 per cent while Yobe State was the least with 36.12 per cent.

The Registrar said 43,608 cases of malpractices were recorded with those who had their cases established, having their results cancelled.

Garba added that schools with defaults had their candidates’ results withheld.

“We have banned seven schools and centres for their involvement in malpractice cases for at least two years and some forever. This action also affects ad-hoc staff. We have blacklisted those involved in malpractices,” the registrar added.

Copyright PUNCH.

CHILDREN,WHAT DO THEY KNOW?…BY INI ENOIDEM, JSS1 STUDENT

 


Children,
What do they know?

Tell them you’re angry
They would say they are hungry,

You’re fed up with life
They would say life is well-fed,

Say poverty is knocking at the door
They would say it is their own puberty.

Tell them there is no food in the bowl
They would you buy football,

You’re down in health
They say, you’re up in health,

You have sleepless nights
Toiling and tilling till the sun sets

Or sometimes soothing their diseases
Still on the morrow

You counsel their complaints
And worry about their needs

Of course they know
That their Guiding Angels

Fill the bowls
Grow the corns

Bring the wealth
Heal the diseases

But Papa and Mama
Do not know.

INI ENOIDEM. J.S.S1

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA…PRACTICAL POINTS OF VIEW OF AN EXPERIENCED EDUCATOR (8)

CONTINUED FROM THE LAST POST

71.We need to ask ourselves if schools are positively helpful or just a waste of time to many children these days.

72.Should tutors not be remunerated through a payment by results system?

73.Should schools’ terminal examinations be set and marked internally?

74.Do tutors ever bother to arouse and keep up curiosity of students in their subjects? Tutors / Schools should be facilitators of learning helping students to be creative and to grow socially, emotionally, intellectually physically, morally, and spiritually – Unfortunately, these days, the facilitators are musicians and perhaps churches to some extent but not schools and tutors.

75.A well-mapped out curriculum is no guarantee that learning takes place. For that to happen teachers who are reasonably competent to motivate students are needed. Incompetent tutors can destroy any teaching program however well-prepared.

76.Considering limited school time how many schools actually set out to get the most out of every minute of the teaching day?A teacher’s work is that of a guided discovery to enable children make discoveries they would not have encountered on their own.

77.Do teachers and schools go all-out to recognize the 3 intelligence types in their students? These are:
a) Natural intelligence based on genes
b) Intelligence based on socialization and type of home environment.
c) Intelligence shown through continuous assessment and terminal tests in schools.
If so what do they actually do to help students classified within a and c since those in b are generally regarded as the business of government and parents? Here we see again that the job of schools and tutors is to find ways to help children who might not find learning that easy.

78.Why do we love using useless maxims and bogus terminologies such as “purpose–built”, “cognitive”,” adaptive” ,”psycho-motor” etc. to mask what students should have experienced when in fact most of them do not? And we know it is because of limited imagination by schools and tutor. Or don’t we? Why don’t we just get up to do the work which is to make students learn how to teach themselves and keep up thinking in a progressive direction? Some tutors talk too much without allowing for participation by their students. In some cases classroom control by tutors is very weak. Even some teachers (depending on the type of schools they work in) usually assume that a certain % of students will fail. The results from such assumptions are faulty unrealistic lesson plans. In fact lesson planning (lesson notes) taking care of individual problems are non-existent in many cases. And while in classrooms tutors must always focus or spend some time on subject concepts and principles.

79.Schools must also aim at “tough love” for students. Discipline must be enforced where necessary by caning and more authority need to be delegated down the line. To do this effectively we need small schools not “Mega” schools. Pupils will be well known. “Small” is not necessarily beautiful in all respects but “Anonymous” is certainly unhelpful in an educational context! Many children in government mega schools may best be described as “Master and Miss Anonymous”.

80.Education is different from schooling and from instruction. But our national education policy’s focus is on schooling and instruction mainly.

TO BE CONTINUED

MIDNIGHT MUSINGS ABOUT TWO NIGERIAN EDUCATIONAL MOCKINGBIRDS: EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES AND MASSIVE FAILURES (3)

CONTINUED FROM LAST POST

d)EXTERNAL STUDENTS

A lot of cheating during May /June school examinations usually get initiated, perpetrated or multiplied by external students.

I must confess this happened in my own schools too where I allowed ex-tutors to register students from their tutorial schools for examinations. You can imagine my surprise one day when I was invited by the police that 7 of my students were caught making photocopies of papers yet to be taken. On getting to the police station I realized that all the students were wearing our school uniforms but I did not know a single one of them! I later discovered from their parents that those who registered them at our school even collected “special examination fees” (for cheating) from them!

So what did we do? For the next examination I recalled a former ex-vice Principal of the school as Special Consultant for WAEC examinations and stopped all registrations through external tutorial schools from the following year. That brought back some sanity to WAEC/NECO examinations being taken at our school.

e)EXAMINATION BODIES (WAEC/NECO/JAMB)

The mention of carpenters, meat sellers and newspapers vendors who are either not qualified or unprepared to take the NECO examination look more like self-condemnation of itself and its registration process. Were these students not supposed to have presented some form of evidence of their preparation or level of education for the examinations? Were they not cleared to be fit and proper for the examinations? But was NECO not more concerned about making money through registrations? 

What about massive leakages of examination papers and corrupt supervisory staff sent to schools by WAEC and NECO during their examinations?

How many of those arrested for EM have been prosecuted to the end?

How many schools are really banned long enough from taking future exams even when there is widespread EM?

MASSIVE FAILURES DESPITE EXAM MALPRACTICES

9.We have written many articles on our educational blog on why massive examination failures persist despite widespread examination irregularities. These include.

a.Absence of long term planning and short tenure of politicians appointed as Education Ministers who while in office engage themselves more in politics than supervising education.

b. The Federal Ministry of Education is a colossus too large to be effective.

c. Educational Support Services covering Remedial work has been neglected for too long. By the time many students take WAEC and NECO examinations it is usually too late to change their mind set or turn them around.

d. Lots of education get to students today from outside the school walls But this reality is yet to be linked or synced with school programs leading in some cases to confusion about how and what to study.

e. There is too much centralization of discipline of tutors who are not up to standard in their work leading to inefficient administration and delayed correction for the sake of students.

f. National Policy on Education, Curricula, Schemes of Work and Syllabuses need massive overhauling.

g. Overpopulation in many public schools leading to classroom environment not conducive for learning etc,etc.

QUESTION

So what needs to be done to cut massive examination failures?

101 WAYS TO IMPROVE SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION IN NIGERIA AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS.

This write-up is made up of 10 posts on our educational blog providing a more detailed search for causes of examination failures and proffering practical solutions for improvement.

Please pay a visit to our educational blog http://Lagosbooksclub.wordpress.com (this blog) where there are over 250 articles on matters related to massive examination failures in Nigeria.

Thanking you.

O.O.ODUMOSU
24/7/2015

MORE SCHOOLS RELEASE POST-UTME 2015 DETAILS DESPITE PROTEST AGAINST JAMB’S CONTROVERSIAL ADMISSION POLICY!

ASK US FOR DETAILS OR VISIT THEIR WEBSITES

Delta State Poly Ozoro Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark Eligibility And Registration Details

ESUT Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUTO Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And registration Details

FUTA Post-UTME/DE 2015:Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUOYE Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

MOUA Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

FUOtuoke Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

AAU Post-UTME/DE 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

UNILAG Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-Off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

For unilag students, you can check your eligibility status by following these steps:
1): Go to Unilag website http://www.unilag.edu.ng
2) Go to Prospective Students
3) Click on Full Time Undergraduate Admission
4) Click on POST-UTME APPLICATION
5) Insert your utme registration number, telephone number and email address.

Augustine University Post-UTME 2015: Date, Cut-off Mark, Eligibility And Registration Details

PREFERABLY GET CORRECT INFO BY VISITING THOSE NEAREST TO YOU INSTEAD OF BEING DECEIVED

COMPREHENSIVE LIST WILL BE UPDATED THIS COMING WEEKEND

Parents, candidates protest as UNILAG defends cut-off marks

A cross-section of parents and UTME candidates protesting against the University of Lagos cut-off marks in Lagos...on Wednesday.

Hundreds of Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination candidates on Wednesday morning stormed the University of Lagos to protest against the decision of the institution to stop them from doing the forthcoming post-UTME.

The candidates alleged that the authorities of university, in liaison with the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board, had rolled out a new admission procedure that prevented them from taking the examination to secure admission into the ivory tower.

Their allegation comes as UNILAG and JAMB defended their different positions in the exercise.

The Head of Public Relations, JAMB, Dr. Benjamin Fabian, said the board did not intentionally exclude any candidate.

He said, “We are only trying to ensure that candidates have better chances for admission this year unlike what obtained in the past. This time around, we do not want to wait till universities end their first choice admissions. We do not want some candidates to forfeit their admission easily. By next week, we shall release the national distribution list that will open more opportunities for them.”

The Registrar, UNILAG, Dr. Taiwo Ipaye, said the university was only working with the post- UTME screening list sent by JAMB.

According to her, only candidates whose names were forwarded to the University of Lagos by JAMB are eligible for the 2015/2016 post-UTME screening.

Meanwhile, many of the candidates, who came with their parents, had converged on the university entrance as early as 7am, chanting solidarity songs and demanding the removal of the JAMB Registrar, Prof. Dibu Ojerinde.

Their action not only caused gridlock at the entrance of the university, it later resulted in the closure of the gate.

The protesters, led by the President, Association of Tutorial School Operators of Nigeria, Mr. Sodunke Oludotun, later forced their way into the university.

According to the protesters, the university upped its cut-off to 250 marks against the recommended 180 marks by JAMB.

JAMB, on July 14 had after its sixth consultative meeting with stakeholders in Abuja, pegged the cut-off mark to 180 for candidates seeking university admission and 150 marks for those seeking places in polytechnics and colleges of education.

Oludotun, who spoke to our correspondent, described the upping of the cut-off marks at UNILAG as illegal.

He said, “Contrary to Prof. Dibu Ojerinde’s announcement of 180 as a minimum score, UNILAG has started selling post-UTME form for only the candidates that scored 250 and above and thereby putting the lives of about 24, 000 qualified and prospective candidates in a state of uncertainty and despair. We are protesting to call the attention of the Federal Government to this injustice.”

Copyright PUNCH.

CURRENT WAEC SYLLABUSES FOR MAY/JUNE AND OCT/NOV EXAMS-MATHS,PHYSICS,CHEMISTRY,FURTHER MATHS

MATHEMATICS

Physics

 Chemistry

 Further Maths

 

VALEDICTORY AND RELATED SPEECHES FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS(2)

DIRECTOR’S ADDRESS (TESTIMONIAL/AWARDS CEREMONY FOR 2/9/2000)

 The Chairman,

Our Honorable Guests,

Parents and other invitees,

Our outgoing students,

Staff members and  other students.

 Today is a day that the Lord has made. It is so because it is of personal joy to me and my wife, the management and staff of the school, our outgoing students and their parents. It is a joyous occasion because in our 10 years of existence as PASS and then Mason College this is the first time we have found it fit to celebrate the passing out of our students with their parents under a formal atmosphere. May the blessings of the day continue to multiply in our lives in the Lord’s name. Amen.

 The address today needs to  focus of course on the objective of the day. I would, however, have loved to touch on various other issues which are related to  day to-day operations of the school. I would have loved to emphasize our areas of strength and successes, mention our weaknesses and our not so successful ventures in the past few years but with special emphasis on the outgoing academic session. Since these could modify the issues of today it has been decided that they would be passed directly to our parents through the terminal/end of year report of the school which will accompany the performance report cards.

 Our focus is to “send-off” our SS3 students as many people say. But those whose minds have been graciously opened by the Lord call it “sending forth”. I wish therefore to “send forth” our outgoing final year students with the following exhortations which I am extracting from a public lecture i gave earlier in the week as part our week long 1999/2000 valedictory programme. The program as we know is winding up  today. Please permit me to list them one by one. I shall be as brief as possible.

 You have been students of this school for various years. We taught you academically and we showed you ways to conduct yourselves in the public, amongst your friends, in the presence of those who are senior to you and those who may happen to be below you. Throughout your life you will continue to be the ambassadors of your parents and of this school. In future some of you will remember this school and your days here with joy and a little tear will come to your eyes. You will remember your classmates and your tutors. You will remember the assemblies, the lunch periods, the game sessions. You will remember the pranks and narrow escapes. You will remember the bright days and you will remember your boyfriends and girlfriends and the disguised relationships. You will sigh, as we have done too, and say to yourself “my secondary school days were the best of my life”. You may not be wrong but we can only pray that the days you spent here will be a few of those that you will consider as the “best” in your lives. As you go forth remember your school and its staff and management in prayers as we are sure to do about you.

 As I told your classmates during the week, this is a school with a historical link to Christ’s School Ado-Ekiti which used to be one of the best schools in the days of the Old Western Region. The name of Rev Mason which we bear is an institution because most of the Ekiti professors  at the Universities of Lagos, Ibadan & OAU today were produced by him. This is apart from the various professionals to be found in every field of human, economic & scientific endeavor including NASA in the U.S.A. We have thus made you  understand the emphasis  on academics studies, scholarship and conduct.

 Above all as you leave you must accept God with all your heart. Do not be found in the company of atheists. An atheist is a man who believes his human form of existence  is an accident in nature. Avoid evil company. There is no such thing as a white devil. Avoid cultism and yahoo yahoo 419 internet fraud.There is no positive balance to you in joining such groups as you move to your next stage of learning. Do not let us see your name or picture in the papers as one of the students arrested for419, cultism or who died from such. The day we see such you will make us and your parents cry. It will be a cry of deep anguish  reaching into the innermost parts of our souls. Avoid liquor. It can destroy the genius  the Lord has planted in you. Smoking may not send you to hell but it can send you to heaven quicker than you expected. Do not swear by heaven for its God’s throne. Violence and witchcraft which to some extent are  being glamorized in Nollywood will lead you nowhere. The Bible says those who live by the sword will perish by it. Remember that our Lord hates arrogance and vanity. Do not practice the art of deceit. Remember the recent case of the speaker of the House of Representatives. No 4 man in the Land. You should note that another sword is presently on the head of the No 3 man. You will need 10 other lies to cover up one little lie. You may need to cite Toronto, Archipelago, Saskatchewan to cover up the so called small lie that you served NYSC when you did not.

 Beware of greed. Nothing is enough to the man for whom enough is too little. Don’t be garrulous in your discussion. They talk most who have the least to say. Don’t be hypocritical. A bad man is worse when he pretends to be a saint. Don’t be idle. The Holy Book says “go to the ants and be wise”. Continuously educate yourself. Education is never ended. Ignorance is not a virtue or innocence. It is a sin. Reject it. Encourage and continually examine new ideas. Never let computer and its developing technology out of your mind. It is a part of the human future which cannot be ignored. Your education will become obsolete overnight if you neglect it. Whether you are an Accounting student or an Accountant. Whether you are a Law student or a Lawyer. Whether you become an Engineering student or an Engineer, always think constantly on how you can apply computer knowledge to your studies, vocation or profession.

 In the field of human relationships don’t be a flatterer. You can not be a friend and a flatterer at the same time. Care for others not by words but by your deeds. Be charitable, feel for others through your pocket too. Encourage others when you lead them even after you correct them. Remember that all are equal before God, even those we regard as servants. Example is also better than precepts. It is in fact the best sermon. Remember that to err is human but to forgive is divine before our Lord of Hosts.

 In your personal endeavors remembers always what you were taught here. That honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom. Proverbs chapter 3:3 also states that you must be loyal and faithful always, to your employers, to your friends and to your family. Shakespeare also says “To thyself be true” Honesty can sometimes be painful. But remember “No pain, no palm- no thorn,no throne, no cross, no crown” Remember God always in your youth. Meditate and pray constantly. There is no other way. Use prayer to dig up all those treasures which the gospels in your churches have revealed to you each week. Prayer will bring peace and blessings. Blissful are also the simple for they have much peace. Be courageous. Courage is the fear that has said its prayers. Listen always carefully before you answer. So says Prov 18:13. Avoid mob opinions. The mob has many heads but no brain. A French man called Thoreau had this to say about the individual who wishes to be different i.e. someone who will not allow himself or herself to be dangerously influenced by his friend or by peer pressure.

“if a man does not keep pace with his companions

Perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer

Let him step to the music he hears

However measured or far away”.

Today as you go forth I dare you to be different if you have to. Every man’s life is a fairy tale written by the delicate fingers of our Father in Heaven above. He alone knows your future. Be optimistic always. Some one said “always keep your eye on the doughnut and not  the hole”.

 When you are out of school or as you grow up certain issues will become and more relevant to you each day. To be a leader you must learn to work through others. If you become the captain of a hall of residence in the University you must  practice the art of doing things in cooperation with others. You must also respect your environment. Avoid encouragement of pollution. Create oxygen by growing flowers. You boys should respect our women. Your wife especially. Do not engage in polygamy even if you are rich or you claim your religion permits it. Women are actually our masters. If you marry two of them you will be serving two masters in reality. Above all read poetry. Read Shakespeare. Read magazines. Read newspapers and watch television. Television is not evil. It is the use to which it can be put that is. Play any new xbox t o ensure that your blood pressure charts are regular. Watch films that can educate you further and which can tell you more about God. Determine today that in your house of the future a library will be a very important part of the house. Don’t be extravagant on the things that are completely unimportant. Don’t let us see you on T.V in future as the Director of the Supporters Club of Shina Peter Fans. Don’t call me in future to celebrate extravagance in anything different from the things of God. Remember that pride is like a beard it must be shaved everyday or as regularly as you must.

 I will like all outgoing students to stand up. Look at yourselves in the face. Hold each order and remember that the friendship you have bonded in the school is a life long friendship which cannot be erased by time, marriage, positions, riches or death. I ask you today to see yourselves as brothers and sisters in future acting in unity on all good things always and sacrificially too for the sake of Reverend Mason whose name we bear.

 

YOU ARE HEREBY SENT FORTH IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER, THE SON AND THE HOLY GHOST(AMEN) THE LORD WILL DEVELOP YOU TO BE GOOD AMBASSADORS OF YOUR SCHOOL, EXCELLENT CHILDREN OF YOUR PARENTS AND HUMBLE CITIZENS OF OUR COUNTRY. (AMEN).

 

I also seize this opportunity to congratulate our staff members who developed you to this level and your parents who paid your fees sometimes under the most excruciating conditions. We pray to the Almighty God that by the time the SSCE results shall be released we shall have cause to smile all  around.

 On behalf of the school I thank the Chairman, the Honored Guests, our parents, staff and all others present for the opportunity given  me to put this address forward.

Thanking  you.

_______________

O.O.ODUMOSU

RELATED POST

VALEDICTORY AND RELATED SPEECHES FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS(1)

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INTRODUCTION OF CHINESE TO LAGOS STATE SCHOOLS AND ALL THAT JAZZ (1)

Fashola defends planned introduction of Chinese in Lagos schools

GOV FASHOLA OF LAGOS STATE

Fashola defends planned

introduction of Chinese in

Lagos schools

FIRST REPORT VANGUARD NEWSPAPERS

Ikeja –  Lagos State Governor,  Mr Babatunde Fashola, said on Sunday that the plan by the state government to introduce Mandarin in public schools was not  to discourage the teaching of indigenous languages.

The governor said during the commemoration of 2,000 days of his administration in Ikeja that the introduction of Mandarin in schools was to give  pupils functional education in consonance with current realities.

He said the emergence of China as a major economic power should compel any serious government to begin to plan for the future.

Fashola, however, said that  no child would be compelled to take the language in school.

The Commissioner for Education, Mrs Olayinka Oladunjoye, recently announced plans by the government to introduce Chinese language in all public schools.

“Our plan to introduce Chinese in schools is not to discourage or stop the teaching of indigenous languages in schools.

“We will continue to teach Yoruba and other languages but we are saying that giving our pupils the opportunity to learn Chinese will be an advantage in a changing world.

“Whether we admit it or not the Chinese are taking over the global economy and we are only preparing our pupils for the opportunities that the use of Chinese language as the possible language of the future  might provide,“ Fashola said.

He said the various interventions  by the state government in the education sector had made positive impacts on the standard of education in the state.

The governor said the state was now ranked among the  states with the best public education in country, while the pass rate in WAEC had  moved from less than 20 per cent in 2011 to over 38.28 per cent in 2012.

SECOND REPORT VANGUARD NEWSPAPERS

LAGOS — Governor Babatunde Fashola of Lagos State, yesterday, justified the proposed introduction of Chinese language in public schools, saying one of the advantages is  aimed at boosting the state economy.

The governor who made the disclosure during the commemoration of his 2000 Days in office in Ikeja believed the state government needed to move fast in line with the global challenge and more important, China is an economic world power.

He said: “The Chinese are in our homes more than we care to admit. China has become our largest economic partner.”

Fashola recalled an instance where there was a need to have an interpreter while a contractual agreement was to be signed between the state government and a Chinese contractor, adding that it was a Chinese who understood English that came to their rescue.

Fashola explained that as the world economy is tilting in favor of China, the trend might eventually affect the English. ‘’Don’t be surprised English may go if the global power moves to Asia.”

RELATED POST

INTRODUCTION OF CHINESE TO LAGOS STATE SCHOOLS AND ALL THAT JAZZ (2)

 

BAYELSA TO SPEND N6BN ON SCHOOLS’ RENOVATION

Bayelsa to spend N6bn on schools’ renovation

mr-seriake-dickson-gov-bayelsa-state

Bayelsa to spend N6bn on

schools’ renovation

Yenagoa – Bayelsa State Government is to spend about N6bn to renovate, upgrade and reconstruct schools’ facilities as part of plans to revitalise the education sector which was crippled by the recent flood.

Governor Seriake Dickson who disclosed this yesterday at the State Transparency Initiative monthly press briefing, said contractors handling critical projects in the state had been ordered to return to site since the flood had receded.

He said the government’s drive to address the decay of public infrastructure, especially schools, was slowed down by the flood.

The governor, who explained that the State Universal Basic Education Board, SUBEB, had awarded N3.5 billion contract for 300 schools, added that the Ministry of Education would, in the next few days, award contracts for another 200 schools valued at about N1.9 billion.

By Samuel Oyadongha

OUR OPINION: …clap,clap,clap…good talk…but let it be swift and do not use it to line the pockets of government officials and party members…let its resultant effect be obvious on the children whose schools are affected…fall out.

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (2) (THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF WAEC MATHS)

 THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF WAEC MATHS

 OPENING VEILS TO REVEAL NATURE OF WAEC EXAM QUESTIONS  

14.These are Arithmetic, Algebra,Trigonometry, Geometry, Probability, Statistics and Structure. These categorizations are important because whenever you are asked a question in maths you should ask yourself two questions.

What branch of maths is this question from?

What topic in that branch of maths is the question?

  Now let us look at each branch briefly.

ARITHMETIC

15.The operations of arithmetic revolve around playing with numbers by changing them from one form to another. However some people define arithmetic as the laws of numbers relating to business arithmetic. This may be so because arithmetic is the basis of all commercial transactions be it computations, bargaining, negotiating or counting.

16.Arithmetic is also the basis of other branches of mathematics and other subjects such as Business Studies, Economics, Accounting, Law, Engineering etc. This means that Arithmetic holds the key of operation to these branches in order to understand them too.

17. 2 important laws under arithmetic, which should be explained by the tutor, are:

          The rule of BODMAS

          The law of PRECEDENCE

The two are interrelated in the sense that they specify the order for calculations in maths.

18. 6 key terms commonly used for questioning under arithmetic are: EVALUATE, SIMPLIFY, FACTORIZE, CALCULATE, FIND and EXPRESS. These should also be explained by the tutor or see relevant paragraphs later on  for more explanation.

ALGEBRA

19. Unlike arithmetic which deals with known numbers, this is the branch of mathematics, which deals with what is called “UNKNOWNS”. This is because not everything in life is known. The interest of algebra is to seek out the unknown number with what is known. To do this, the first step is that the unknown number which is sometimes called a variable is denoted in either English or Greek alphabets. These alphabets are then developed as algebraic expressions or equations. In summary, the point to note is that unlike arithmetic that relates to calculating with numbers known or definite in values, Algebra on the other hand relates to calculating with equations containing unknown numbers But the same arithmetic rules and steps of  BODMAS and PRECEDENCE are still used. Some people therefore see algebra as a twin brother of arithmetic or as equations, which rely on rules of arithmetic for their solutions.

20. There are 4 key terms normally used for questioning under algebra. These are: SOLVE, SIMPLIFY, PLOT/CHART and FIND.Please note that key terms for the remaining branches of maths shall be specified under another write-up titled QUESTION TYPES,VISUALIZATION AND CRYSTALLIZATION…

TRIGONOMETRY

21. Trigonometry developed in the earlier days because of the need for measurements of days and distances between two points on the surface of the earth by human beings traveling from place to place. This was done through the use of triangles. However, it was also extended to measurements of chords for music and arcs of a circle.

22.Trigonometry tests the ability of students on the use of triangles through TRIGONOMETRIC RATIOS and IDENTITIES using the acronym known as SOHCAHTOA.

23.Trigonometry covers the calculation of trigonometric functions of a certain angle from those of other angles using such typical relationship of formulae as: SIN 2A = 2 SIN A COS A.

24.Trigonometry tests the ability to understand the relationship between ratios of angles e.g. Tan Q = Sin Q/Cos Q.

25.Trigonometry also tests the knowledge of trigonometry tables and the ability to determine the form of angle ratios in various quadrants. It also shows how to plot, sketch or calculate values and measurements relating to Sine or Cosine curves.

GEOMETRY

26.This is the earliest developed branch of maths. It is the study of different shapes of figures and proportions of space and object. It developed as a means of addressing the problems of shapes and beauty.

27.Geometry covers three major areas –plane, solid and analytical.

28.“Plane” refers to 2—dimensional flat surface e.g triangles and squares.

29.“Solid” refers to 3—dimensional objects i.e those with length, breadth and height e.g. Cuboids, Cylinder, Cone, Pyramid and Sphere.

30The usual question on “Plane” geometry relates to length, breadth and areas of physical objects whereas, “solid” geometry include volume as an additional measure. 

31.“Analytical” usually refers to the addition of algebra to plain or solid geometry.

32.Under geometry there are many theories which student might be asked to “prove” they might also be “trace” the shape of figures based on the principles of “Locus” of a point using mathematical instruments.

  PROBABILITY

33. We live in a world on uncertainties. A world in which no one knows that will happen the next minute. Our lives are governed by chances, which are unknown to us though they are clearly known to God. The study of probability developed in relations to things that are surround us. Probability is likened to a game of likelihood and revolves around the extent to which an event is likely to occur. It is measured by the ratio of the number of the favorable cases to the number of the possible cases.

34. Probability is therefore a ratio of measurement and has a value that lies between 0(that is, the event not occurring at all) expected) and 1(tha is,the event occurring as expected).Restated in another way when the probability is zero it means that the event will not happen or take place, but when the probability is one it follows that the event will  certainly happen. For example, the probability that the sun will rise tomorrow is 1.

35. To measure probability, data must be collected, arranged and processed e.g the number of times rain falls in a month. Secondly, the data can be presented in various ways such as charts, figures; tables etc for explanatory purposes. Even graphs can be used. After presentation; those who want to use the data will then study and analyze them in terms of locations within the total set and according to dispersal from one another. Thereafter the data is interpreted for decision – making purposes. However when the data is used for prediction purposes if is said to be used for “Regression” and “Extrapolation”. The process then moves from collecting data to predicting future events. Sometimes people say probability is used for prophesy or for foretelling  future events so that human beings can take measures of safety before unfortunate events come upon them.

36.The different types of probability are: Experimental, Theoretical, Mutually exclusive probability and Independent events. (go over this again in your text books or seek  for assistance from your tutors). However take note of the following expressions and know their implications clearly.

               Mutually exclusive events (one event excludes the other e.g. positions in an exam)

               Mutually independent event (one event is not affected by another e.g. tossing a coin many times)

               Dependent event (when the outcome of an event depends on another. E.g.

              passing Jamb or not will affect your admission into a university.)

 STATISTICS

37. To prophesy under probability, we have to gather data which is then processed to predict an outcome. The data we gather is called statistics. It is therefore obvious that probability and statistics are related to one another.  

38. Data gathered as said earlier can be used to describe the habits shown by a set of information gathered. The principal measure is called a MEAN and others are the MODE, the MEDIAN, CENTRAL TENDENCY, VARIANCE and STANDARD DEVIATION. (your textbooks or tutors again please). These measurements are called descriptive statistics. Another type is called theoretical statistics, which depends on an  advanced form of mathematics called Probability and Games theory. In theoretical statistics the laws of probability are merged with statistical methods, to infer the nature or characteristic or ways of behavior of the composition of the population from the simple data. You may ask what statistics are used for, there are 3 major uses, and these are

             Scientific research, commercial and industrial activities.

             Social uses like elections and population census

             Inferences and predictions using estimation from arithmetic.

 STRUCTURE

39. This is the last and newest branch of mathematics relating to set theory and logic.

RELATED TOPICS

THOSE WHO FAILED WAEC MATHS ALSO MISSED THESE KEY AREAS IN THEIR PREPARATIONS!

BASIC ETIQUETTE FOR PASSING WAEC AND SCHOOL MATHS  EXAMS

CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF WAEC MATHS FOR EXAM SUCCESS?

100 EXAMPLES OF QUESTION-PHRASES USED BY WAEC IN MATHS EXAM

WAEC MATHS TOPICS FOR QUICK REVISION

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (1) SO YOU THINK MATHS IS DIFFICULT?

HOW TO PASS WAEC/NECO MATHEMATICS (MATHS)

84 STEPS TO WAEC/NECO MATHS HEAVEN (1) SO YOU THINK MATHS IS DIFFICULT?

MAKING  WAEC MATHS MAKE SENSE  – 84 STEPS FOR WAEC MATHS

COMPILED BY OLUKAYODE  ODUMOSU, EX-PROPRIETOR, MASON COLLEGE, FESTAC,LAGOS

PREAMBLE

84 STEPS TO MATHS HEAVEN IS AN ATTEMPT PORTRAY MATHS IN A MORE REALISTIC AND FRIENDLIER MANNERTHAN MANY TUTORS BOTHER TO.IT  IS A COMPILATION OF MATHS METHODS AND NOTA WRITE-UP ON A PARTICULAR TOPIC UNDER MATHEMATICS.THOUGH IT MIGHT BE USEFUL FOR REGULAR SENIOR SCHOOL MATHS CLASSES IT IS MORE USEFUL AS A PSYCHOLOGICAL BOOSTER FOR MATHS CLINICS OR MATHS REMEDIAL CLASSES.KINDLY TAKE NOTE OF THIS

1.In this write-up “maths” means mathematics.

2.So you think maths is a difficult subject? Yes many other students think so too. But have you asked yourself why?

3.Experiences over the years have pointed to many reasons which include family stories that maths is difficult.

4.Terror-producing teaching methods by teachers who don’t really know how to teach the subject is another reason. Many students have been victims of their fuzzy or meaningless explanations. Many of them forget that maths teaching should be seen as assisted performance for students. How do student make any progress in maths when they cannot make sense of any key topics or mathematical operations? For instance, what does 20 ÷ 5 or 30 ÷ 1/2  + 10 means? Here I am not referring to the answer but that the teacher needs to explain what the operations mean.

5.Similarly, many teachers do not believe that a student can work above what they think is the competence of the student. Hence they make very little effort at what is called remedial work, maths clinics, maths continuos practice and maths special programmes as in Mason College.

6.Again many teachers fail to link maths to real life. Many teach maths without physical or pictoral examples. They expect students to be mathematically correct by assuming that each one should be able to think ABSTRACTLY. Not even the commonest and cheapest educational aids are used. They assume even that every student must have a mathematical mind leading to a rather austere portrayal of the subject.

7.Yes we will not leave teachers alone because many of them use robotic; imitative memorized styles of teaching with little conceptual guiding. It is a fact that no one can make maths easy. But it should be taught with a soul.

8.Naturally, many students are afraid of maths because of its difficult words. Sometimes, the problem comes from maths questions too. These can be confusing. Add to these a lot of formulae which students are not nowadays, asked to prove and which may not easily be remembered. In summary, many students cannot even understand the purpose of maths.

GOODNEWS!!

9.But there is good news for you. We care for your feelings about maths. We believe we can make you  make sense out of maths.  You can become friendlier with maths. You can “walk the walk and talk the talk” of maths.

10.To do this, you must understand that maths is a language. Surprised? Yes the teaching or learning of mathematics should be regarded initially as the extension of the teaching of a foreign language from which you acquire some proficiency through certain rules and practices.Those rules must be observed otherwise practice will be difficult.On the other hand those rules will be not be useful without practice.

11.It must be noted that the rules are based on logic and reasoning before maths can be made  intelligible. Fortunately all of us can reason whether we are in JSS 1 or SS 3. In fact, we do reason all the time or don’t we? When we have our bath early in the morning, we do not bite the soap. When we eat we dot put the fork or spoon in our eyes or on our heads. We know what is good and what can be harmful to us. When our parents speak to us or when we listen to our church pastor or the imam in the mosque we “reason out what they tell us. We query what appears to make no sense at all. Therefore the first basic ingredient for our maths soup which is ability for logic and reasoning is possessed by most human beings.

12.Mathematics is a living subject which requires thinking (mental effort) along with reasoning. There must be a deliberate thought process that we want to reason out in a maths situation because many of them are abstract (the tutor must explain this clearly to the student).

Under paragraph 10 above we referred to “rules and practice” as the basis for making sense out of mathematics. So what are these rules? They are as follows:

CATEGORIZE the seven branches of maths.

EMPHASIZE your understanding of the basic concepts and principles of maths.

VISUALIZE & CYSTALIZE maths through question phrases.

RECOGNIZE useful hints, formulae, signs, symbols and notations.

MEMORIZE the procedural steps for maths solutions.

Now let us consider additional notes on these in detail

 NEXT: DETAILED NOTES ON THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF MATHEMATICS AND HOW KNOWING THEM CAN HELP  MAKE SENSE OUT OF MATHS

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (2) (THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF WAEC MATHS)

HAVE YOU READ?

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (2) (THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF WAEC MATHS

THOSE WHO FAILED WAEC MATHS ALSO MISSED THESE KEY AREAS IN THEIR PREPARATIONS!

BASIC ETIQUETTE FOR PASSING WAEC AND SCHOOL MATHS  EXAMS

CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF WAEC MATHS FOR EXAM SUCCESS?

100 EXAMPLES OF QUESTION-PHRASES USED BY WAEC IN MATHS EXAM

WAEC MATHS TOPICS FOR QUICK REVISION

HOW TO PASS WAEC/NECO MATHEMATICS (MATHS)

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FOR THIS AND  SUBSEQUENT POSTS UNDER 84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN

1.STUDENTS’ DICTIONARY OF MATHEMATICS BY B.O SOYEMI (EDUCARE FOUNDATION)

2.MR O OWOLABI (EX-MATHS TUTOR,MASON COLLEGE FESTAC)

HOW TO PASS WAEC/NECO MATHEMATICS (MATHS)

 HOW YOU CAN BEAT WAEC MATHEMATICS

 A. EVERYTHING STARTS FROM SELF-BELIEF AND CONVICTION

1. Most students wonder whether maths is real or just a torturing spirit of the air whose form or goal can neither be “seen” nor understood. Sometimes they understand a bit of it but most of the time they wonder what it is really all about.

2. But the worst cases are those who have psychologically accepted that in them maths is dead  and buried. This group also believes that nothing can be woken up from within to change their attitude towards maths.

3. Our message today is that if you are one of such students you are very mistaken. There is no magic to understanding maths or to unlocking its doors than overcoming your anxiety or hatred for the subject. You might have been led astray by your beliefs, convictions and perhaps backgrounds. But the good news is that you can come to love maths like many others who eventually shed their togas of unbelief through our schools, Mason College and PASS Tutorial College both in Festac.

4. Each of you must understand that God planted maths in everyone. There is no one with a special maths mind or brain. It is your attitudes and beliefs that determine   performance. Each human being is a mathematical end-product of the almighty God. Nothing shows this more than when the left-hand side of our bodies is compared to the right-hand side and you get an exact match. Every hair, vein, artery or muscle in our bodies including all the cells are mathematically numbered and programmed by God. Maths is therefore not a spirit and definitely not as far away from you as you think.

5. There is maths every where around you even in your rooms, kitchens, toilets, beds, and television. The balls you play and the plates you use to eat food are all basedon maths. As long as you have a cylindrical, spherical, cubical, or any object of any shape you are directly or indirectly using objects made or produced through maths. And there is none of them you cannot calculate its length, radius, circumference, arc, area or volume by the use of a simple string or meter rule.

 

B. BE PREPARED TO FORGIVE TUTORS WHO ARE NOT HELPING YOU

6. Lack of good teachers might also have killed   enthusiasm for minimum effort on the part of many students. And in others the gates to maths understanding were closed and padlocked by tutors’ attitudes and teaching methods. The classrooms of such tutors are usually torture chambers during maths periods. And today you still remember how much relieved you usually are when maths periods are over. But do you know that there is no need for such antagonism? Are you aware that your relationship with maths was not supposed to be that bad?

7. Are you aware the write-up titled “84 Steps To Maths Heaven” was purposely written to help improve  your attitude towards maths in case your teachers failed to deliever? Please allow us suggest you forgive such teachers as their mistakes are usually that of omission and not commission?

C. SCHOOLS ALSO HAVE MANY CLOSE AND PERSONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAKE

8. In Mason College, weak maths students had to go through at least 2 of 4 maths remedial programs depending on individual performances,evaluations and categorization. These programmes were called MATHS CLINIC, MATHS CONTINUOUS EXERCISES, MATHS FOUNDATION CLASSES and MATHS PRACTICALS. Edupedia shall be willing to be consulted on these for implementation in schools.

9. Students tend to think maths is made up of calculations only.That is far from the truth. A good school can direct the minds of its students to more humane maths-related activities such as MATHS POETRY/SONGS, MATHS ESSAYS, MATHS DEBATES, MATHS DIALOGUE, MATHS RADIO, MATHS LOGIC GAMES, MATHS PUZZLES, WORD PROBLEMS, QUICK MATHS, KITCHEN MATHS, ROAD MATHS, MONEY MATHS, BUSINESS MATHS, MATHS NEWS, MATHS MILESTONES and a host of other related activities to take the anxiety out of learning and applying maths practically to life.. The aim must be to instill confidence in students by proving that maths is just a series of very simple steps from every day living and that it is not a ghost.

D.  INTRODUCTION TO “84 STEPS TO MATHS HEAVEN

This is a write-up divided into 84 paragraphs and 6 appendices. Its proposals are as follows:

BRANCHES OF MATHEMATICS

10. THAT TO UNDERSTAND MATHS EACH STUDENT SHOULD KNOW ITS BRANCHES.MATHS IS SAID TO HAVE 7 DIVISIONS NAMELY: ARITHMETIC, ALGEBRA, TRIGONOMETRY, GEOMETRY, PROBABILITY, STATISTICS AND STRUCTURE. BUT IT IS EASIER FOR A NIGERIAN STUDENT TO THINK OF MATHS AS A COUNTRY WITH 7 STATES WITH EACH  HAVING A SET OF RULES AND REGULATIONS TO BE STUDIED AND REMEMBERED BY THE STUDENT. THIS IS BECAUSE CLASS WORK,  HOME ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMINATION QUESTIONS CAN BE EASILY RECOGNIZED FOR APPROPRIATE SOLUTION METHODS. ON THE OTHER HAND OUR STUDENTS CAN IMAGINE MATHS AS A HOUSE WITH SEVEN BEDROOMS WHICH ARE INTERCONNECTED.

CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS

11. THAT TO UNDERSTAND MATHS EACH STUDENT  MUST REMEMBER THAT MATHS IS A LANGUAGE LIKE FRENCH WHOSE WORDS AND MEANINGS HOLD THE KEY TO THE HOUSE REFERRED TO ABOVE. MATHS CONCEPTS MUST BE STUDIED AND INTERPRETED LIKE YORUBA, IGBO, HAUSA OR ANY SECOND LANGUAGE. UNFORTUNATELY, BECAUSE ITS CONCEPTS ARE IN ENGLISH, MANY STUDENTS TEND TO THINK THEY KNOW WHAT THESE CONCEPTS ARE. WHAT MANY  FAIL TO REALIZE  IS THAT MATHS CONCEPTS ARE THE ENGINES FOR SETTING MATHS QUESTIONS AND THAT THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING WELL- GROUNDED IN THESE CONCEPTS CAN NEVER BE OVEREMPHASIZED. CONCEPTS CONSTITUTE A VOCABULARY WHOSE MEANINGS MUST BE CONTINUOUSLY CHECKED TO UNDERSTAND MATHS.

IMAGINATION/VISUALIZATION

12. THAT TO TRULY UNDERSTAND MATHS THERE IS NO BETTER WAY  THAN THROUGH IMAGINATION AND LOGIC.YOU ALSO NEED TO VISUALIZE MATHS PROBLEMS  WITH YOUR 3RD EYE (YOUR MIND) BEFORE YOU CAN SOLVE THEM.

FORMULAE,HINTS,SIGNS,NOTATIONS AND SYMBOLS

13 THAT YOU NEED TO GET USED TO MATHS FORMULAE, HINTS, SIGNS, NOTATIONS AND SYMBOLS.

OTHER COMMON SENSE FACTS RELATING TO MATHS (SEE DETAILED NOTES IN THE “84-STEPS” WRITE-UP)

 14. READ THE NEXT  MATHS TOPIC  BEFORE YOUR CLASS MATHS LECTURES.

15. WHEN WRITING CLASS NOTES OR ANSWERING QUESTIONS WRITE ONE STEP BELOW THE OTHER RATHER TO THE LEFT THAN TO THE RIGHT OF THE PAGE OF YOUR NOTEBOOK.

16. ALWAYS WORK AS MANY PROBLEMS AS POSSIBLE AT THE END OF EACH CHAPTER IN YOUR TEXTBOOK. THIS IS WHAT MATHS CONTINUOUS PRACTICE IS ALL ABOUT. UNFORTUNATELY THIS  SEEMS TO BE THE ONLY  EMPHASIS BY MOST TUTORS.

17. OBEY ALL MATHS ETIQUETTES WHEN PRACTICING SOLUTIONS.

18 .IF A PROBLEM CANNOT BE SOLVED IMMEDIATELY DURING CLASS LECTURES OR STUDIES, DON’T BE DISCOURAGED. READ LATER OR RE-READ YOUR TEXT BOOK OR READ ANOTHER ONE FOR MORE IDEAS. AND THEN RE-ATTEMPT ITS SOLUTION.

HAVE YOU READ?

BASIC ETIQUETTE FOR PASSING WAEC AND SCHOOL MATHEMATICS EXAMS

100 EXAMPLES OF QUESTION-PHRASES USED BY WAEC IN MATHS EXAM

CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF WAEC MATHS FOR EXAM SUCCESS?

WAEC MATHS TOPICS FOR QUICK REVISION

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (2) (THE SEVEN BRANCHES OF WAEC MATHS)

84 STEPS TO WAEC MATHS HEAVEN (1) SO YOU THINK MATHS IS DIFFICULT?

 

 

TO NIGERIANS,HOME OR AWAY!

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATES/RECORDS

…do you want us to retrieve any of your academic records in any part of Nigeria?…WAEC/NECO certificates or University transcripts?…secondary school testimonials and/or transcripts from your old schools?…

ACADEMIC/BEHAVIOURAL MENTORING SERVICES

…or do you need educational  mentoring services for a child, brother,sister,cousin etc with regular progress report on a monthly basis?…we have up to 50 different topics to report on your ward covering classroom domain,academic tools,academic-related skills,life skills and leisure skills…critical scores for further attention shall be indicated and followed up…if you want to see a new person in your child,ward or relation within just one academic session please get in touch with us..

our e-mail address is lagosbooksclub@yahoo.com or edupedianigeria@yahoo.com

MASON COLLEGE,FESTAC IN PICTURES:OUR FANTASTIC YEARS OF SELFLESS,DEDICATED AND SOUND EDUCATION!(7)

…we visited Covenant University (above) and University of Lagos to whip up our students interest in higher studies…one of our areas of special interest were their libraries…and many of our students eventually attended Covenant University as a result of these frequent visits… locations where there were impressive displays of books like The Jazz Hole and Glendora in Ikoyi were also visited…Glendora is one of our major suppliers of books for over 10 yrs now…

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…thank God for our parents!…what could we have done without them!…shade, our ex-student and daughter of one of them(third from right) just graduated with a first class degree in economics from university of lagos…the father actually informed us…we say congrats to shade and her family…shade this is wishing u God’s blessing on the job u picked out of the two offered to u by financial institutions on the spot!….amen

…most of those in this pic answered the call of their alma mater in the past few days…mason had over 160 of its ex-students as friends on fb within just two days!..

MASON COLLEGE:REMEMBERING OUR DAYS AT AN EXCELLENT SCHOOL!

…name us if u can!…

…disciplined environment…we had a-plenty…

…….the champions!….how many faces in the pic can u remember?…

…every event was well-organized by our tutors…and we had the only student information world club amongst all schools in the state!…it was total education we were provided…remember also all the foreign newspapers and magazines in our library available for students to read during break periods?…

MASON COLLEGE,FESTAC IN PICTURES:OUR FANTASTIC YEARS OF SELFLESS,DEDICATED AND SOUND EDUCATION! (4)

…during holiday school…like big brother of africa housemates!…

ho!ho!ho!….he was such a happy looking man!…ugh?…

unbelievable!…no one would have remembered we did some cheerleading!…and  remembere our multi games court?

…everything we did was done in very good measure…no cutting of corners!…

…other schools were wondering how we packed in 4 times their rate of activities into ours…ha!ha!ha!